Weigh Stations

HINO SG

Adventurer
thats only half true, the CDL comes in to play for hauling commodities, you can buy and drive a full fledged 18 wheeler with a 53 ft trailer for your own amusement if you want to,,, i dont want to get into my feelings on this matter so i'll leave it there.
I did say that private motorhomes are being allowed to operate well over the 26, 000 lb limit, and yes, those chassis are mechanically identical to a commercial truck.

U-haul, Ryder, etc. all spec their largest trucks @ 25,999 lbs or some arbitrary figure so they can be rented to the general public.

I still think that operation a 26k lbs+ truck that is not registered as a RV without a CDL would be considered illegal, regardless of whether it's for hire or not. Guess I'm going to have to actually look the stuff up, though.

Sorry about the thread drift, doesn't have a lot to do with the weigh station question.
 

lehel1

Adventurer
rules in calif for trucks ??

hello

just joined this forum and am enjoying. i also am just about ready to purchase a new fg for duel purpose use, one as a work truck and then putting a custom 14 foot alaskian camper on it for traveling. have a unimog expedition camper now that we've traveled in for years and ready for something more modern, we found we just don't use the unimog to its full offroad capacity any more.

well, onto calif rules. i've just spent a month or so going over the rules with the chp and hope this helps anyone in calif .

1st, any truck with a manufatures gvwr of over 10000lbs is a considered a full commercial vehical, this includes pickups which are no longer considered pickups in this sense. you must get a motor carrier permit as well as a CA #. the permit is $35 the CA # free. you must also put your name or a fictitious name connected with your name on the side of your truck along with the CA# and your registered weight rating sticker you payed for at the dmv. you must also enter all chp scales. you will "not need" a class A licence if your gvwr is under 26000.
the only difference in for hire or not for hire is you pay higher fees in some cases.

2nd, if you pull a trailer with a gvwr of over 10000 lbs, regardless of your trucks gvwr you will need a class A licence and all the above applies.

3rd, if your registered as a motorhome, your exempt. if you solely pull a travel trailer up to 10000 lbs your exempt, for 5th wheel travel trailer you can go to 15000lbs with an endorsement. over that you will need a class b

for motorhomes over 26000 you will also need a class A. there are other rules that apply even if your under 26000lbs if you have things like air brakes and such. some will require endorsements and other a class A licence.

now get this, if you have a truck under 26000 lbs gvwr rating, and you solely pull a utility trailer (this means you may not diconnect the trailer under this rule, is a bumper pull and a gvwr under 10000 lbs) you are exempt from all of the above including not having to enter scales. even better is you can overload a utility trailers gvwr as long as you don't exceed the total rating of the combination of the trailers tires. the calif vehicle code section for this is 34601 (g) and applies to section 27900, 34501.12, and 34507.5

for me personally this is a absolutely shame. i've been driving my kodiak pickup with a gooseneck trailer for the last 5 years and now find i have to follow all these rules. freinds of mine in the bay area have been getting pulled over with similar rigs and being hit with $9000 fines and more. others have been being pulled over in brand new pickups (many new duallys have a rating over the 10000 gvwr) and being ticketed miles from the dealer and told there trucks will be confinscated if seen on the road again until everything is in order. its totally out of hand here in northern calif.

we were also very suprised that while looking for a new fuso fg we find we cannot purchase a new truck out of state even if its 50 state compliant unless its concidered used and has over 7500 miles on it. this is according to the dmv office in sacramento. we found one nice new 07 out of state recently and find we can't buy it and register it here, and it has 50 state emissiions. something about no calif sticker, the 50 state one doesnt count.

well, enough of that. were excited about getting our new fuso and look forward to getting to know some of you on here.

hope this helps some questions lehel and laura
 
Last edited:

lehel1

Adventurer
calif reg con't

hello defenderbeam

yes, was hoping to find a 07 long wheelbase instead of the 08/09 because of the emissions. the emissions will change again in2010 and i'm somewhat concerned about having a 1 or 2 year oddball.
we've been unable to find a 07 longwheel base though, so it seems we'll be settling for a 08.

anyone knowing of a new or near new late model pre 08 fg longwheel base for sale please let us know. we'll be picking up an 08 in a couple of weeks but still hoping to get lucky in the meantime.

it would be very interesting to see if someone can indeed rerate a trucks gvwr, look forward to hearing any news on that one.

cheers lehel and laura
 

FusoFG

Adventurer
The Fuso comes with a manufactures statement of origin or similar paper work with the intention that the body builder that adds the final body to the Fuso chasis will apply for the title with the final gvw.

Any body builder should be able to specify a gvw less than or equal to the gvw specified by Mitsubishi.
 

Robthebrit

Explorer
hello

just joined this forum and am enjoying. i also am just about ready to purchase a new fg for duel purpose use, one as a work truck and then putting a custom 14 foot alaskian camper on it for traveling. have a unimog expedition camper now that we've traveled in for years and ready for something more modern, we found we just don't use the unimog to its full offroad capacity any more.

well, onto calif rules. i've just spent a month or so going over the rules with the chp and hope this helps anyone in calif .

1st, any truck with a manufatures gvwr of over 10000lbs is a considered a full commercial vehical, this includes pickups which are no longer considered pickups in this sense. you must get a motor carrier permit as well as a CA #. the permit is $35 the CA # free. you must also put your name or a fictitious name connected with your name on the side of your truck along with the CA# and your registered weight rating sticker you payed for at the dmv. you must also enter all chp scales. you will "not need" a class A licence if your gvwr is under 26000.
the only difference in for hire or not for hire is you pay higher fees in some cases.

lehel and laura

Lehel, you getting rid of the mog?

You are bang on about the rules but there are a couple of gray areas. First is that weird gray area between 10,000 pounds above which CA calls any vehicle commercial and 15,000 pounds where the weight stickers start. A smaller round cab mog lands in this gray zone.

The second gray area is even if the GVW is over 10,000 pounds you can ask the DMV to register it as empty weight as long as the empty weight is under 8,000 (this is what they do for a domestic pickup). If you do this you can't ever be over 10,000 pounds if you get weighed. This avoids most the weight fees.

This worked out fine for my 416 doka as it was just under 8000 empty and I only ever took it camping and never came close to 2000 pounds of load (you can only drink so much beer in a weekend!).

Rob
 

dhackney

Expedition Leader
we've been unable to find a 07 longwheel base
It's a pretty simple matter to extend the frame on the FG.

We did it on ours and it was very straightforward.

1) disconnect the frame by grinding out the rivets
2) insert extension section
3) connect with grade 8 bolts
4) extend brake lines
5) extend wiring harness
6) extend exhaust pipe
7) fabricate new drive shaft

This list makes it look a lot harder than it was.

I wouldn't let frame length put you into the new fuel requirement, at least if you're planning on taking it overseas.

Doug
 

mog

Kodiak Wrangler
we were also very suprised that while looking for a new fuso fg we find we cannot purchase a new truck out of state even if its 50 state compliant unless its concidered used and has over 7500 miles on it. this is according to the dmv office in sacramento. we found one nice new 07 out of state recently and find we can't buy it and register it here, and it has 50 state emissiions. something about no calif sticker, the 50 state one doesnt count.
I'm surprised by that one. Unless it has chanced, the 7500 miles only applied to emissions. If you are 50 state legal, you could 'import' but would still have to pay sales taxes, but you should be fine on emissions.
From current DMV website:

Anyone who brings a vehicle into California, or purchases a nonresident vehicle while in California, should be aware of the registration requirements.
NOTE: California law prohibits importing and/or registering a new vehicle with less than 7,500 miles at the time of purchase unless it meets or is exempt from California Emission standards. If you acquire a 49-State vehicle (manufactured for all states except California) from another state or country, you may not be able to register your vehicle in this state.
http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/brochures/howto/htvr9.htm
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

lehel1

Adventurer
bringing a new fuso into calif

hello there

checked again on binging a new truck into calif, and indeed was told again by dmv sacramento unless its thru a dealer you will most likely not be able to register any deisel truck with under 7500 in calif.
on top of this if you have bought an 07 or older deisel truck and live in calif, you will need to retro fit it with the new particulate system now on the new trucks. the date seems to be by 2012 or close to that i'm told, there seems to be alittle uncertainty on the exact dates and how it will trickle down to the smaller deisel trucks.

i have also been told other states are watching calif and many may follow suit in the coming years to battle pollution.

this is to the best of my knowledge so far, be great to hear others veiws and more info if any one has some to share.

cheers lehel
 

iandraz

Adventurer
As a follow-up - I didn't stop at any weigh stations on my trip from Florida to Oregon. No one pulled me over so I guess I'll take that to mean it's okay not to stop in an FG!
 

jesusgatos

Explorer
I didn't have any problems registering my Deuce and a Half (M109) as a motorhome here in OR a few weeks ago, but I'm having a hell of a time finding a company that will insure it...
 

Arctic Cat

Adventurer
I know this is an old thread but I will like to add my two cents. I'm a retired as Special Agent for the U.S Department of Transportation. Weight stations are designed to weight commercial vehicles to make sure that those vehicles meet the weight restriction. Every state has their own definition of weight restrictions in their highways, but with that said the key word in here is COMMERCIAL. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulation (FMCSR), have two definitions as to what is a commercial vehicle.

The first definition is on 49 CFR Part 390.5 and it read as follow:
Commercial motor vehicle means any self-propelled or towed motor vehicle used on a highway in interstate commerce to transport passengers or property when the vehicle— (1) Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight, of 4,536 kg (10,001 pounds) or more, whichever is greater; or(2) Is designed or used to transport more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation; or(3) Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation; or(4) Is used in transporting material found by the Secretary of Transportation to be hazardous under 49 U.S.C. 5103 and transported in a quantity requiring placarding under regulations prescribed by the Secretary under 49 CFR, subtitle B, chapter I, subchapter C.

Also 49 CFR 390.3(f) clearly state that “Unless otherwise specifically provided, the rules in this subchapter do not apply to— (3) the occasional transportation of personal property by individuals not for compensation nor in the furtherance of a commercial enterprise.

So there you have it. If you are just RVing or driving a truck for your own pleasure the regulations are not applicable to you.

The other definition is regarding CDL license. While CDL licenses in the U.S. are issued by the each individual state, every state has to abide by the federal definition in 49 CFR Part 383.

49 CFR 383.3(a) (a) state as follows: The rules in this part apply to every person who operates a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in interstate, foreign, or intrastate commerce, to all employers of such persons, and to all States.

So as you can see if there is not commerce, the regulations are not applicable to you:

Examples 1: John drives a 36,000 lbs RV for his pleasure from Alaska to Wyoming. He is not engaging in any commerce whatsoever. The regulations do not apply to him.

Example 2: Jane drives a 36,000 lbs RV to take it from the factory in Ohio to the dealership in Florida. She gets paid to do this. Because she is charging to do the work, the regulations are fully applicable to her including the CDL requirements. She would need a Class B CDL license.

Example 3: Martha drive tractor with a trailer to carry her horses to a show. (GVWR of the tractor 30,000 LBS with a trailer with a GVWR of 14,000 LBS) She doesn't get any money or prizes to do so. Also she doesn't have any sponsors. She does this for pure pleasure. Once again no commerce not regulated.

Example 4: Stephen drives a tractor with a trailer to carry his horses. (GVWR of the tractor 30,000 LBS with trailer with a GVWR of 14,000 LBS) He doesn't actually get any money to do so. But he competes and he may win a prize of $500, if he comes on first place. Also he has a sponsor that provides feed for his horses in exchange for him to put their name on his trailer. The DOT don't care whether you win the prizes or not, but to the DOT the fact that you may make some money is enough to prove commerce in this case, additionally because he actually advertise for the feed company in exchange for the feed for his horses, the monetary value of the feed is considered a factor in determining his compliance with the regulation. Also because the combination of the tractor and trailer is over 26,000 LBS with a trailer over 10,000 lbs, he will need a Class A CDL license. :1888fbbd:
 

Arctic Cat

Adventurer
Also about the weight; The weight that the Federal DOT use to determined the weight of the vehicle is the GVWR stated on the plate not the actual weight of the vehicle, UNLESS the vehicle actual weight EXCEED the actual GVWR, in that last case the ACTUAL weight will be used.
 
Top