Water shoes (not the crappy mesh/rubber ones)

#1
Looking for a suggestion on some "water shoes", and not the crappy ones that are all mesh on a rubber sole you slip into.

I am looking for an actual shoe that designed for constant in and out of water.

Salomon seems to have a few offerings:

XA Amphib - Looks like a running shoe made for the rain, no support around the toe for rocks,etc.
Cross Amphibian Swift - Same deal as above, but looks more like a walking than running specific shoe
Techamphibian 3 - Looks like what i am after, but the sketchy heel strap has put me off. Has also gotten poor reviews about comfort and construction.

Anyone have experience with any of these or other similar shoes? I basically want a hiking shoe thats built with non-absorbant materials and has adequate drainage. I plan to use these for lake/river crossinging or walking around in rocky streams, so i need the good toe protection.

I do NOT plan on running these barefoot, i use darn tough wool socks exclusively and even when soaking wet still keep my feet warm.
 
#2
I like KEEN stuff, and I got a pair of the sandals for in/out of water use.

I don't like sandals, I have a hard time getting past that. As far as sandals go I tolerate the KEENs on the rare occasion I need them, which is pretty much just kayaking. Only complaint was they tend to hold some water when you are back on dry land, the drainage isn't excellent, but they do protect your feet and particularly the toe area well.

I'd say I'd like them a lot better if I even liked that kind of shoe. I have a hard time wearing sandals when I am accustomed to wearing steel toe KEEN hiking shoes all day, every day, partly because I work in a facility that requires steel toes in some areas, but mostly because I like a good solid shoe with ankle support.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
#3
I understand your desire for toe protection but I'll say that many years ago I was introduced to Chaco sandals (then called Geckos) by a river guide buddy and I've worn them ever since. If you get the version with the extra toe loop they are very stable and they have a real Vibram sole. Their job was to do work dragging around boats but also not hold water and dry fast.

I've found they complement real boots, which I wear the majority of the time actually driving. My feeling is proper 4x4 footwear are leather mid height boots with steel toes and good ones that are maintained should not have an issue with ankle deep water. The nice thing about sandals is they can be put on and removed fast, so they complement boots rather than replace.

I also like sandals on a daily basis but *hate* unsupportive shoes. Chacos don't use velcro but rather webbing slides, have fine heel and arch support and, as I mentioned, your feet don't slide around with the toe loop ones. I prefer them to everything except boots really. I have a pair of La Sportiva Primer low hikers I wear in the winter and they feel less supportive than my Chacos to be honest.
 
#4
You might look at 5.10 Canyoneering shoes, they are more like a boot. Or just google canyoneering shoes there are other brands out there but these are the most popular. Depending on how much water hiking you do you might also try neoprene socks.
I have an old pair of La Sportiva Exum River shoes that are not made anymore that I use along with neoprene socks.
 
#5
I've been running Salomon TechAmphibs for years, and haven't had a problem with them... BUT in the bigger sizes there are some gaps which may or may not work for you (I'm lucky, a 12.5 UK is ideal for me)

I also have a pair of Keen Hood River boots, which are a very different fit but worked well with a drysuit and thick socks in the winter or a pair of neoprene socks in the summer.

NRS do a workboot that might be worth looking at - I've not used them, but remember them from years ago - https://www.nrs.com/product/2338/nrs-workboot-wetshoe

As others have said, 5.10 Canyoneers are generally a go to for this sort of thing - they just weren't easy to find in the UK for me.
 
#6
Appreciate all the feedback guys. I stumbled across the arc'terx acrux approach shoe which looks like it might also be a good contender. I am a size 11 US, so maybe the techAmphibs will work for me, i like salomon shoes and their mid height boots i have.
 
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#7
I don't think it is what you have in mind, but I just picked up a pair of crocs swiftwater sandals. I was wanting something for canoing/kayaking but didn't want to spend lot of money. Looked at the chacos, keens and others, but seemed pricey for me to wear (most likely) only when canoeing.

The swiftwater sandals are not like the regular crocs. I found a sale and additional discount on shoes.com and got a pair for under $30. Figured it was worth a shot. Only worn them once, but seemed fine for what I needed. Not sure I would want to hike in them though. The soles leave a bit to be desired as far as traction is concerned.
 
#8
Bahaha. Won a trip to Hawaii years ago with a bunch of other Toyota Dealers. One of the guys was from Louisiana and was a hoot. He wore his crappy/mesh water shoes from the time we were on the plane over til back off the plane at home. We called him "water shoes" all week long. He didn't care a bit. Even got to play drums with the band they had for us on the last day. Yep, in his water shoes.
 
#9
the 5.10 canyon shoes are rock solid, ugly as hell and have awesome super sticky rubber
I am huge fan of the chaco Z2 but if you want something with a closed toe also check out the Chaco outcross. A few of the raft guids at the company I work out have good things to say about them.

I would avoid keens. They just dont hold up as well as they should if you are constantly in and out of water. I blew through a pain in a few months.
 
#10
Sandals are definitely a no go, i'd rather deal with wet socks when i know i'm going to be in and out of water and can just wring them out when i get on land. I can't think of a scenario where i'd prefer sandals over wet feet in shoes.
 

axlesandantennas

Formerly Double-Desert
#11
I know!! I know!!

Altama OTB maritime assault boot.

I’m a huge dork for military stuff so I gravitate to stuff like this. I also wore Altma jungle boots exclusively while in the military myself and can attest to the quality.

I bought the low top OTB shoes. They look like a pair of tacticool chuck Taylor’s. Way heavier too. The insert is a non permeable solid chunk of rubber. The shoes have a drain hole on each side of the toe box. The inside is some sort of mesh.


I wear mine most days. I put in a Nike insole as the original is a it much for daily use.

Look around and you will find them for about 60 for the low tops. I bought mine at a local place for that price. I have the low tops in multicam because, why not!!

C800AF7B-E666-4DE0-945E-087BCDA32740.jpeg F0DAAED9-AF85-436D-8F75-83577D24A825.jpeg
 
#13
I understand your desire for toe protection but I'll say that many years ago I was introduced to Chaco sandals (then called Geckos) by a river guide buddy and I've worn them ever since. If you get the version with the extra toe loop they are very stable and they have a real Vibram sole. Their job was to do work dragging around boats but also not hold water and dry fast.

I've found they complement real boots, which I wear the majority of the time actually driving. My feeling is proper 4x4 footwear are leather mid height boots with steel toes and good ones that are maintained should not have an issue with ankle deep water. The nice thing about sandals is they can be put on and removed fast, so they complement boots rather than replace.

I also like sandals on a daily basis but *hate* unsupportive shoes. Chacos don't use velcro but rather webbing slides, have fine heel and arch support and, as I mentioned, your feet don't slide around with the toe loop ones. I prefer them to everything except boots really. I have a pair of La Sportiva Primer low hikers I wear in the winter and they feel less supportive than my Chacos to be honest.
I second Chacos. I have high arches and they fit perfect. I wore Keen's for a while but found them insufficient for hiking even short distances. They also stank when worn not in water. Maybe that's just my feet though. I have narrowed down my footwear to three categories these days : boots, running shoes, and a pair of Chacos. I can hike most moderate trails in them comfortably if the need should arise so they make a perfect pair of shoes to keep in the truck as a backup. Another nice thing is they are kind of trendy in mountain culture right now so I can wear them socially when I run out of clean socks.
 
#14
I know!! I know!!

Altama OTB maritime assault boot.

I’m a huge dork for military stuff so I gravitate to stuff like this. I also wore Altma jungle boots exclusively while in the military myself and can attest to the quality.

I bought the low top OTB shoes. They look like a pair of tacticool chuck Taylor’s. Way heavier too. The insert is a non permeable solid chunk of rubber. The shoes have a drain hole on each side of the toe box. The inside is some sort of mesh.


I wear mine most days. I put in a Nike insole as the original is a it much for daily use.

Look around and you will find them for about 60 for the low tops. I bought mine at a local place for that price. I have the low tops in multicam because, why not!!

View attachment 447582 View attachment 447583
Have you tried the high tops? Those look like what i am after, and I am a mil gear whore as well so thats another plus :p
 

axlesandantennas

Formerly Double-Desert
#15
Have you tried the high tops? Those look like what i am after, and I am a mil gear whore as well so thats another plus :p
Brothers in kind!

I did look at the high tops but went with the lows for two reasons. 1) hightops tend to make my pants, wheather jeans or other type, rest funny on the shoe. Strange huh? 2) the lows were about 15 bucks lower. I figured if they were going to suck, I wanted to pay less.

I have had these for a few months and don’t regret them at all. They are heavier than normal shoes so they will be a bit odd at first. I walk at work for lunch to keep from getting more flabby and normally wear these. I walk about 3 miles so, these are not too bad for long walks.