Unimog Camper under construction

Iain_U1250

Explorer
Finished with the current modifications. First the new 190lt fuel tank, all sorted and connected. It took 20lts to get to the point where I could get the fuel pump to suck






The tool box is also in, it is big enough to hold four jerry cans, but most of the time it will just be extra storage, holding heavy items like the tool bags etc. The box is made from 1.6mm steel, with a strip of 5mm steel underneath as a support connection the front and rear brackets.



An open box is no where near as strong as a closed box like a fuel tank. The chassis flexes a fair amount, so I had to make the supports so the the box is not loaded by the twisting of the chassis. I made the front bracket so that it can pivot and has a couple of millimetres of freeplay around the hole and a teflon pad between the bracket and the box to reduce friction. I will find out if it works as soon once we get off road.



Here is the finished result - the inside is lined with marine carpet to reduce rattles and wear inside.



It is about 3" above the lowest point on the truck, so should be OK. We have not gotten into any situations where we have even come close to bottoming out the chassis.
 

Iain_U1250

Explorer
We drove down a pretty steep side slope today, over 30 Degrees on our in-cab Tiltometer.


14666277_351829628483345_185137537799623725_n.jpg

We were on a Defender Club day our part of a long convoy. We came down a steep hill and then were on the side slope, no way to turn around. It was way beyond our comfort limits, but we made it. We then had to turn around and head back along the slope again. One particular turn to which we made going uphill, would be very difficult now we were approaching it going downhill. We got one of the cars to rig up a winch line through a snatch block attached to a tree then onto the top of the roll bar behind the cab. It was more of a safety rope than anything else, and we ended up not needing, the line stayed slack the whole time, it but I think we were pretty close to our limit. On the way out the truck lent up against a tree, the roof bars doing their job protecting the edge and the solar panels from damage.

I'm not sure what our actual tipping limit is, but I think were were pretty close.
 

Sitec

Adventurer
I think you are too close.. My nerves are going just looking at that!! If one of the old tyres had let go at this point, it would have been Game Over! That's pretty impressive it has to be said.. I would never have put it staying upright at that angle. Well done.
 

Iain_U1250

Explorer
It was pretty scary, lucky I had new tyres on. The worst point was when the roof bars got to the end of the tree we were leaning on, even going in 1st gear low range, iti did slip off quite quick. In hindsight I should have used the winch / snatch block on the rest of the slope as well. There was a lot of talk around the campsite on how to improve that, airbag suspension would be the best option, going to look into it.
 

Joe917

Explorer
I think you had lots of leeway. The biggest danger is a sudden rocking motion caused by turning uphill sharply or dropping a wheel in an unseen hole, or perhaps building up side pressure by sliding along a tree the suddenly releasing it...
 
That's why I went with the 90mm offset wheels (stock 161mm). Tipover angle is about 2.2deg greater with the wider track (1970mm, too wide for comfortable running on CSR etc).
Charlie
 

Coachgeo

Explorer
An old school KISS way rockcrawlers have prepped for such things is a small winch at each axle ends whose sole purpose was to compress down the suspension on the uphill side. Granted saw this done more for creasting steep rock faces to keep from flopping/EndO..ing backward but concpet applies same here.
 

thebigblue

Adventurer
Looks scary, yes - but as you know, as long as the center of gravity is within the footprint of the tires you´re good - seems to me there´s room for more leaning (based on my estimate on the center of gravity of the Mog)
 

Iain_U1250

Explorer
To be honest I was quite sure it would be OK, or I would not have driven down the hill in the first place. By my calculations, we should be good up to 35 degrees, I estimate the CG to be almost at the level of the rear hatch handle. We have had it at 28 degrees before, and this was at 30 degrees for a short time, but the majority of the time we were under 25 degrees.

The worst part was not on the video, that was the downhill turn onto the slope, a 90 degree turn going downhill. I decided to get one of the Land Rovers to attach a safety rope to the roll cage as I made the turn, just in case.

I was in first gear/low range and just on idle, so going as slow as possible.

Sliding off the first tree was a bit unexpected, but since there was another tree there to lean on it would be OK, but it gave me a bit of a fright, any sudden unexpected movement was not pleasant at that angle.
 
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