ultra compact slide in / sleeper

rruff

Explorer
Great! Are the sheets custom sized for your camper so all you need to do is join the pieces? You have so many angles, so I'm curious how you will do the joints.

Also, what is the cost like?
 

Gunner207

Observer
Because there are no surfaces larger than 4x8 I am using all standard sheets. Less expensive, quicker delivery, and you would be amazed at the uses for even small cut-offs.

Joint angles will be halved between the panels on each side of the joint, then bonded, and reinforced where needed. I have some thoughts that I have yet to test for joints such as variable angle splines that can be wet out with epoxy, clamped in a male/female mold. When cured they would be bonded into dadoes in the edges of adjacent panels.

Carbon core sheets range in price from around 100 to 250 a sheet depending upon thickness and skins.
 

rruff

Explorer
That price sounds better than a couple other places I've seen. Online store is here if anyone is interested. You may need to ok their policies to access it : http://www.carbon-core.com/store/

What is shipping like?

So every place you have an edge, will you use fiberglass tape and epoxy inside and out to make the joint? The spline idea sounds interesting. What material would be used? How would you rout out the core? For door and window openings, how would you deal with the exposed core edges? How will you deal with reinforcements for attachment points?

Is the luan as bad as the crappy stuff they sell at Home Depot? Can you get laun one side and fiberglass on the other? Don't see it as an option.

Sorry, lots of questions, but you've peaked my interest. I was about to buy material to make my own panels with 3mm Okoume, XPS and wood stringers, 3mm Okoume, polyester resin and fiberglass, gelcoat. Plastic core looks like it might be easier and better.
 

Gunner207

Observer
Shipping from carbon core was as easy as only company I've dealt with. Shipped UPS Freight for $120 bucks. Needs to be dropped at a commercial address with a loading dock or forklift.
 

Gunner207

Observer
With the right interior components mounted into the exterior panels and crossing joints the use of splines and inner and outer reinforcement isn't always necessary.

I have made splines in a couple different ways. The can be made from fiberglass reinforced foam board like coosa board or marine plywood, or I have molded splines from fiberglass tape and bulking fabric in a simple tray mold.

The core can literally be routed out with a router, easiest with a horizontal router table, or can be removed with a Dado blade.

You do not have to route all the way to the exterior skins, but should closely match the thickness of the splines. Edge cores are routed out and replaced with coosa board for solid mountains of hardware. Cores can also be drilled from the edge and fiberglass dowels can be epoxied in. For middle panel attachment points you cut a larger hole from one side with a forstner bit and then fill the void with epoxy.because of the honeycomb coring the epoxy plug gets keyed in under the edges of the skin you drilled out. Very strong attachment points.

Luan is luan, but that being said, they can make up virtually any panel you desire.

Happy to answer questions and I'll help out anyone that I can. Hopefully this weekend I can get all my parts cut out. Monday the heat is being plumbed in my new shop and we can start the glue up.
 

Gunner207

Observer
With the right interior components mounted into the exterior panels and crossing joints the use of splines and inner and outer reinforcement isn't always necessary.

I have made splines in a couple different ways. The can be made from fiberglass reinforced foam board like coosa board or marine plywood, or I have molded splines from fiberglass tape and bulking fabric in a simple tray mold.

The core can literally be routed out with a router, easiest with a horizontal router table, or can be removed with a Dado blade.

You do not have to route all the way to the exterior skins, but should closely match the thickness of the splines. Edge cores are routed out and replaced with coosa board for solid mountains of hardware. Cores can also be drilled from the edge and fiberglass dowels can be epoxied in. For middle panel attachment points you cut a larger hole from one side with a forstner bit and then fill the void with epoxy.because of the honeycomb coring the epoxy plug gets keyed in under the edges of the skin you drilled out. Very strong attachment points.

Luan is luan, but that being said, they can make up virtually any panel you desire.

Happy to answer questions and I'll help out anyone that I can. Hopefully this weekend I can get all my parts cut out. Monday the heat is being plumbed in my new shop and we can start the glue up.
 

rruff

Explorer
Thanks for the info, much appreciated!

Just called Carbon-Core and have a sample box on the way, Tommy was very pleasant and helpful. Shipping estimate to NM from VA was ~$310 for 16 4x8 25mm core + luan both sides, which is pretty reasonable. I asked about getting different skins, and he said that it wasn't a possibility. I'm guessing because I'm non-commercial, I need to stick with standard stuff. Which is either luan both sides, 17oz fiberglass both sides, or 34oz fiberglass both sides. The luan was a 4 week lead he said.

Are the 3 plys of the luan about equal in thickness? I used luan about 16 years ago that was quite decent, but the stuff I've seen at Home Depot lately has paper thin face sheets and thick core. That obviously won't be very strong.
 

Gunner207

Observer
There is Luan and then there is 3mm plywood each side. Ask Tommy what the total panel thickness is. I will post an edge photo in the morning.
 

rruff

Explorer
The pricelist says "luan/meranti 2.7mm". There aren't two options there, just one.

Tommy didn't know any specifics on the plywood.
 

Gunner207

Observer
Edge of panel
IMG_0100.jpg

Three equal plys, inside and out will be finished with several coats of interlux inter-protect barrier coat then lined type product, so not really concerned about delamination, etc
 

rruff

Explorer
That looks like decent ply. You did order off the shelf panels, correct?

Do you think it would be ok to put a layer of light fiberglass and resin, and gelcoat on the exterior? That's what I did on my last one and it seemed very durable.
 

Gunner207

Observer
Of course you can do that, just remember that it is the fiberglass reinforcement that makes it strong and not the resin or epoxy. Use the minimum amount required to wet out the fabric. I wound also suggest paint rather than gelcoat as it is so much easier to repair. The fiberglass offers abrasion resistance and strength across the seams.

And yes those are standard panels with 3 mm on each side.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
I like the design. :ylsmoke:


A couple of thoughts/concerns for you though.

* beveled corners. While they look super cool, and will most certainly strengthen the cabin,
they waste a terrible amount of (already VERY limited) interior space. Personally, Id eliminate the beveled corners.

* rear hatch. Again, looks cool, and has some nice features with regards to headroom when open, but dont forget about moisture.
It has the potential to be a leak nightmare. And dont forget about snow if you do any snow camping/travel.
Open that hatch with snow on it, and it will drop right into the cabin.



Beyond those, I really like it. Love the big windows for all the reasons you mentioned.
Love the compact design, as it looks very functional with little to no wasted space, assuming it suits your needs.

Should be a great build, and Ill be watching. :ylsmoke:
 

rruff

Explorer
I wound also suggest paint rather than gelcoat as it is so much easier to repair.
I think gelcoat will be easy and low maintenance the way I'm doing it. It's the same material as the resin, and just paints on after the glassing. Unless I'm missing something? I don't care about a flat smooth surface and it will be white. If there is any damage the patched area might look slightly different, but that's fine with me.

I think a lot of people avoid fiberglassing the exterior because they want a smooth finish, and the repeated fairing and sanding to acheive that is a lot of work and mess. Or they don't realize how easy it is if they don't. I'm not planning to sand at all; at least I didn't last time, and the surface was fine IMO, and very strong and durable.

I'm interested in how you will fit and attach the edges of all your facets. It looks like a lot of work to me, but I'm guessing you have a plan to make it easy.
 
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