Tundra vs F150

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Jnich77

Expedition Leader
I dunno... you paid more for a 2WD F150 than I did for my Tundra. Fan boys and egos? Did the Tundra become a status symbol when I wasn't looking? Along with your numbers you're going farther and farther into silly-territory.

You paid less... Good for you, I'm guessing they are not equally equipped. Here in Central Fl the Tundra cost a couple thousand more than the domestic trucks.

Do tell..what am I being silly about?

As for It being a status symbol... Have you failed to notice the blind loyalty amongst Toyota owners on this site, or in general?
 
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rruff

Explorer
As for It being a status symbol... Have you failed to notice the blind loyalty amongst Toyota owners on this site, or in general?
It's hardly "blind loyalty" when someone chooses a more reliable truck that is cheaper to own. The fan boyism of full size trucks definitely favors the big 3. The Tundra is considered foreign (even though it's designed and built in the US), and that is very important to the big-macho-image truck market. When the current model Tundra came out in 2007, all the "performance" metrics you are using were in the Tundra's favor, but it's never been a big seller.

This is silly: "Even if the Tundra would be worth 25% more at the end of its life, the 6-8 mpg increase and 30% cheaper insurance for the F150 makes up for It. "

Even with the baby turbo, the mpg is 3-4 better (which is a lot, granted). Why on earth would insurance be 30% cheaper on a F150? Anyway... when Edmunds computes "cost of ownership" they include fuel costs, insurance, maintenance, repairs, depreciation, etc. And the Tundra is still cheaper by a good margin.
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
It's hardly "blind loyalty" when someone chooses a more reliable truck that is cheaper to own. The fan boyism of full size trucks definitely favors the big 3. The Tundra is considered foreign (even though it's designed and built in the US), and that is very important to the big-macho-image truck market. When the current model Tundra came out in 2007, all the "performance" metrics you are using were in the Tundra's favor, but it's never been a big seller.

This is silly: "Even if the Tundra would be worth 25% more at the end of its life, the 6-8 mpg increase and 30% cheaper insurance for the F150 makes up for It. "

Even with the baby turbo, the mpg is 3-4 better (which is a lot, granted). Why on earth would insurance be 30% cheaper on a F150? Anyway... when Edmunds computes "cost of ownership" they include fuel costs, insurance, maintenance, repairs, depreciation, etc. And the Tundra is still cheaper by a good margin.
More reliable is debatable. I just spotted the 1979 Dodge my grandfather used on a cattle ranch, later driven by my brother through college. It even had the family rodeo sticker and tennis stickers on the bumper. Some old guy was driving it out of our local grocery store parking lot. I nearly crashed into a hedge doing a double take. Last time I saw that very unique looking short bed was 20 yrs ago several years after my brother had sold it. It was two blocks from my house in San Francisco.

That truck towed 5th wheel stock trailers on and between huge cattle ranches. In college I used it to herd a huge Brahma bull out of a field he had broken into. It didn’t have a kind life. Got 8mpg on a good day and isn’t a collector truck. So if some old dude is driving it to get groceries it hasn’t had any major failures rendering it scrap value. lol
 

bkg

Explorer
It's hardly "blind loyalty" when someone chooses a more reliable truck that is cheaper to own. .
How many people in this forum can honestly say they own any Toyota because they did months of independent research and determined the Toyota is more reliable and cheaper to own, as you claim?

I’ll help: ZERO. Not even you.
 

Jnich77

Expedition Leader
It's hardly "blind loyalty" when someone chooses a more reliable truck that is cheaper to own. The fan boyism of full size trucks definitely favors the big 3. The Tundra is considered foreign (even though it's designed and built in the US), and that is very important to the big-macho-image truck market. When the current model Tundra came out in 2007, all the "performance" metrics you are using were in the Tundra's favor, but it's never been a big seller.

This is silly: "Even if the Tundra would be worth 25% more at the end of its life, the 6-8 mpg increase and 30% cheaper insurance for the F150 makes up for It. "

Even with the baby turbo, the mpg is 3-4 better (which is a lot, granted). Why on earth would insurance be 30% cheaper on a F150? Anyway... when Edmunds computes "cost of ownership" they include fuel costs, insurance, maintenance, repairs, depreciation, etc. And the Tundra is still cheaper by a good margin.

Guess you missed the part where I have owned both.... I didn't have to turn to Google.

Here is some math for you...what is 25 minus 18? That's the difference on fuel economy between the two trucks at 70MPH. What is 28 minus 19? That's the difference between the two trucks at 65MPH. What is 21 minus 14? That's the difference between the two trucks at 80MPH.

As for insurance, easy: the F150 is cheaper to repair. It has a modular body as was designed to be easily repaired. The F150 also has a higher safety rating. Don't take my word for it though... Please, please,please turn to Google for proof.
 
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bkg

Explorer
I certainly did the research, but it didn't take months.
And you made a purchase decision based only on empirical data and nothing else, right?

There is only one honest answer to my question, btw. And you know what that is.

But will you admit it?
 

NevadaLover

Forking Icehole
As for It being a status symbol... Have you failed to notice the blind loyalty amongst Toyota owners on this site, or in general?
Talk about hypocriticism, you've spent 40+ pages trying to convince anybody reading that unless they bought an ecoboost they made a mistake, you type all over the portal how your ecoboost is the greatest and here you are talking about fanboys?
Try reading your own posts with open eyes, there is No better example of fanboy!
 

rruff

Explorer
And you made a purchase decision based only on empirical data and nothing else, right?
There is only one honest answer to my question, btw. And you know what that is.
But will you admit it?
Admit what? Christ! Is it really that odd to look up data when it's so easy to find? I buy whatever serves my needs the best. I preferred the F150 based on everything but reliability/longevity and cost. I really liked all the spec options: engine options, torsionally stiffer frame, gearing options, etc. The Tundra won because the things it's better at are more important to me.

Guess you missed the part where I have owned both.... I didn't have to turn to Google.
Anecdotes aren't data. And aren't you comparing 2wd to 4wd?
 
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