Tundra vs F150

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rruff

Explorer
Their perspective is that nothing else matters, as long as it has a 'Yota badge. I sympathize with this argument as well.
I think blind brand loyalty is more likely to afflict lifelong devotes of the Big 3...

I would have been happy with an F150 if I could have gotten it configured the way I wanted for a good price. XL or XLT double cab with 8' bed, 4x4, 5.0L, heavy payload, high ratio differential, lockers, big tank. Would have been perfect. But I couldn't find any on a lot within 1000 miles, and ordering it would have cost full price. Granted the last 4 items are missing from the Tundra, but on the plus side the Tundra was a lot cheaper too (on the lot, year end clearance)... and the Tundra is cheaper to own because they hold their value better, dwarfing the difference in fuel cost... because of better reliability/longevity.

Performance? It's already excessive...
 

docwatson

Adventurer
The only thing I've learned from this thread is to never buy a used F150 on @Jnich77 because he does high boost launches in 4wd.

Oh and the Tundra is old.

Can someone explain why I need more from a half-ton truck than the Tundra offers? I'd think if I was regularly towing 9k I'd want a bigger truck anyway
 

badm0t0rfinger

Observer
Can't you say that you like a vehicle based on subjective values rather than objective ones? I think that is a pretty reasonable middle ground. I prefer my own F150 I would say just as much as someone likes their own Tundra.
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
The only thing I've learned from this thread is to never buy a used F150 on @Jnich77 because he does high boost launches in 4wd.

And? Would you rather I lift it, over load it, and then abuse it off road for thousands of miles? Also, mine is a 2wd... Bud I do take it to the track, it is modified, and it does a wonderful job of hurting peoples feelings.

As for the rest, if you want to pay tomorrows prices for yesterdays truck, you are more than welcome to do just that. There is certainly nothing wrong with the Tundra, other than its only competitive with trucks from a decade ago. For my money, I'll take speed, power, comfort, safety, and higher ratings over brand loyalty any day and twice on pay day.

If having "Toyota" stamped on the tail gate is the most important thing to someone... Then that's their decision to make.
 

docwatson

Adventurer
@Jnich77 my bad, I thought you had said it was in 4wd earlier. I stand corrected.

I didn't know that I said I would prefer an overloaded, lifted abused truck. That said, if I was looking at a truck and found out it had been abused, I'd trust the Tundra over the F150 to keep going.
 

SETundra

New member
LOOK AT MISTER FANCY PANTS WITH HIS GOOD INSURANCE OVER HERE.

Thats awesome tbh.
Don't think it's fancy and the payout came not from my insurance but the at fault party.

The point of this was to show how Tundras hold their value well. This was part of the reason I bought a Tundra even though it and the Ford are more truck than I really need.and the reason why I went straight back to the dealership after settling with the insurance company to buy the exact same Tundra only a year newer.
 
No need to worry about wiggling... The F150 has an electronic "anti-sway" feature built in. ;-)
The anti-sway feature in the F-150 doesn't kick in until your about to wipe out... I can still feel my trailer sway a bit behind me when cruising down the highway.

I would recommend a anti sway bar on the weight distributing hitch.

The factory anti-sway is like a back up system to aid a proper anti-sway bar.

Not sure how the anti-sway feature works on the Tundras.


They have zero problem stopping a heavy trailer.
Even with the factory trailer brake set at 4.5 gain, I can still feel the trailer behind me while slowing. I think any half ton would. Fortunately, I haven't had to make a panic stop while towing.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
The small differences between the current Tacoma and other Toyota cars (virtually identical to the Camry) are fueling, cam profile and packaging related, not durability related, that is the difference, not rocket surgery. Does it make a difference from a reliability standpoint? Who knows. But from a durability standpoint, probably, based on the HP #'s they are getting out of 2.3's and it's history of a being a Hi-Po engine and the changes Ford has told us were made to increase durability.
They might be small, but there are differences nonetheless between the different 3.5l v6 applications. As far as durability, Toyota is widely recognized for engineering their base engines and designs for durability. So why do they need to engineer even more for the Tacoma application? The base 4.0l v6 and 5.7l v8 were at one point offered with factory-designed and factory-warrantied supercharger kits...no reinforcing or mechanical changes required for the base engine.

The 2.3l ecoboost in the Ranger might have been reinforced for truck duties...does that necessarily mean it's a more HD engine than the 3.5l v6? I concede the torque discrepancy between the two is quite obvious...the durability discrepancy isn't. Both are car engines...that's the bottom line.


based on? Never towed with an F150, but towed plenty with Tundras in the 6500-7500 range. Not sure I'd want to tow more than that with a Tundra, regardless of ratings.
Based on the fact that the F-150's chassis is no more robust than the Tundra's chassis. And Based on the fact that at 9k lbs and beyond, any of the current 1/2 tons, perhaps excepting the Nissan Titan XD, just aren't that great at towing and handling heavy loads. Ford made the bare minimum amount of changes to the F-150 HD to allow for that "higher" towing/payload rating. It might have 3/4 ton-like towing and payload ratings, but its underlying chassis is still very much a 1/2 ton in terms of design.


They have zero problem stopping a heavy trailer.
Really? And yet the Tundra with bigger brakes for some reason does have a problem with stopping heavy trailers?
 
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calicamper

Expedition Leader
The anti-sway feature in the F-150 doesn't kick in until your about to wipe out... I can still feel my trailer sway a bit behind me when cruising down the highway.

I would recommend a anti sway bar on the weight distributing hitch.

The factory anti-sway is like a back up system to aid a proper anti-sway bar.

Not sure how the anti-sway feature works on the Tundras.




Even with the factory trailer brake set at 4.5 gain, I can still feel the trailer behind me while slowing. I think any half ton would. Fortunately, I haven't had to make a panic stop while towing.
The anti sway tech seems to really confuse people and probably shouldn’t be called anti sway. All modern vehicles today have stability systems that will work to keep things right side up and pointed in the right direction but they don’t fix the cause of sway. Especially with trailers that may have an issue or some type of design problem that causes them to sway. Thats the part people need to investigate and fix or dampen so the cause is delt with vs waiting for the stability system in the tow rig to realize theres a problem with potential to end badly etc.
 

Cackalak Han

Explorer
...Based on the fact that the F-150's chassis is no more robust than the Tundra's chassis. And Based on the fact that at 9k lbs and beyond, any of the current 1/2 tons, perhaps excepting the Nissan Titan XD, just aren't that great at towing and handling heavy loads. Ford made the bare minimum amount of changes to the F-150 HD to allow for that "higher" towing/payload rating. It might have 3/4 ton-like towing and payload ratings, but its underlying chassis is still very much a 1/2 ton in terms of design....
Have you actually towed (significant weight) with either chassis? I am curious, because I am looking to pick up an F150. I thought it towed very well (5k lbs), but never towed anything more than that. There are lots of people "mag racing" these trucks. I wanted to get some real world experience. I am a long-time Toyota owner, but for the next truck, I am leaning Ford. (And that's between the F150 and Ram. Tundra really isn't being considered).
 
The anti sway tech seems to really confuse people and probably shouldn’t be called anti sway. All modern vehicles today have stability systems that will work to keep things right side up and pointed in the right direction but they don’t fix the cause of sway. Especially with trailers that may have an issue or some type of design problem that causes them to sway. Thats the part people need to investigate and fix or dampen so the cause is delt with vs waiting for the stability system in the tow rig to realize theres a problem with potential to end badly etc.
Exactly. Well said.
 
Have you actually towed (significant weight) with either chassis? I am curious, because I am looking to pick up an F150. I thought it towed very well (5k lbs), but never towed anything more than that. There are lots of people "mag racing" these trucks. I wanted to get some real world experience. I am a long-time Toyota owner, but for the next truck, I am leaning Ford. (And that's between the F150 and Ram. Tundra really isn't being considered).
I tow a 5K travel trailer with my 2015 w/ 5.0L and 3:73's. Plus load the box up with stuff for the trip. It does okay. Usually pulling about 2,000 RPM at 65 mph.

I can feel a little wag in the trailer with windy conditions or a passing oncoming Semi. Not horrible but, enough that I can feel it.

If I wanted to add a bit more crap in the box, (which I do...) I'd go 3/4 ton next time around. May help keep the trailer a little straighter too.
 
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