Tundra vs F150

Status
Not open for further replies.

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
Ford increased the payload on the f150 by making it lighter.

They made the frame stiffer by using a larger cross section but made it thinner to save weight.

They got increased efficiency and it can tow a big boat but it would be really easy to tear up.

Of course you can tear the Toyota up pretty easy too so is the little bit of durability worth the extra weight.
Clearly you missed the part about the frame on the F150 being fully boxed and made from a higher strength steel.

Also, a truck being made lighter by using modern materials, engineering, and manufacturing in no way means that has compromised durability.
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
In Yosemite a Canadian was complaining about getting 6-8 mpg in his Tundra pulling a 22' trailer from home. I don't know if the F-150 would yield any more.
Probably not. The major difference would be in the performance, the 2.7/3.5 in the F150 wouldn't care all that much about the trailer.
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
based on? Never towed with an F150, but towed plenty with Tundras in the 6500-7500 range. Not sure I'd want to tow more than that with a Tundra, regardless of ratings.

9k behind a Tundra, using an on ramp that's on a hill is not a pleasant experience. 9k behind a 3.5 on the same on ramp is not a big deal. Literally a 20-25 MPH difference in speed at the top of the hill.
 
based on? Never towed with an F150, but towed plenty with Tundras in the 6500-7500 range. Not sure I'd want to tow more than that with a Tundra, regardless of ratings.
Same. But, I wouldn't tow that much with any half ton regardless what the manufacture says it's rated to tow. I like to leave lots of wiggle room, lol.
 

nickw

Adventurer
I am glad to see this thread is still going.

Comparing the tundra and f150 is kinda like comparing apples to water mellons.

I think the f150 is more comparable to the first gen tundra or the Tacoma. It is a light duty half ton truck that is good for pulling a camper or a boat on the weekend.

The current tundra is more like a lightweight 3/4 ton like what you would get in the 90s.

I realize that comparing the mighty f150 to a Tacoma might hurt some feelings so flame away.
Not even close.
 

nickw

Adventurer
Not always, but for example in the case of brakes, bigger 4 piston calipers with bigger braking surfaces usually equate to better brake performance and longevity. The F-150 is rated to tow more but does so with smaller brakes...just food for thought.



I'm sure there are small differences. FWIW, there are also small differences between the Tacoma's 3.5l and the 3.5l used in other Toyota/Lexus platforms....The underlying design is fundamentally same. The same holds true for the Ranger's ecoboost.




There are a lot of things Toyota does which I don't turn a blind eye too. I'd like to see more torquey and more efficient engines offered in their midsized offerings. I'd like to see higher payload ratings across their truck lineup. Apple Carplay should have been made standard several years ago. Lots of areas I think Toyota could improve upon.

But longevity and durability aren't among those shortfalls. When the current gen F-150 is ten years old, how will it be holding up? What will it sell for? The answers to those questions don't really matter to a lot of F-150 owners...in years past, Ford, and the other big 2, didn't have a good track record for long term reliability with their 1/2 tons, and to some degree, their 3/4 tons. Maybe that will change going forward. But until that is proven, Toyota owners will continue to buy Tundra's and Tacoma's, in spite of their shortcomings.
The small differences between the current Tacoma and other Toyota cars (virtually identical to the Camry) are fueling, cam profile and packaging related, not durability related, that is the difference, not rocket surgery. Does it make a difference from a reliability standpoint? Who knows. But from a durability standpoint, probably, based on the HP #'s they are getting out of 2.3's and it's history of a being a Hi-Po engine and the changes Ford has told us were made to increase durability.

The reason I brought it up was due to Toyota's change in strategy, not a *$&&ing contest between the two. Toyota went from a global design philosophy to a North American based modular design philosophy, it's not the historic Toyota way....they are getting soft IMO. They used to have a common engine with the Hiluxs, Prados and Cruisers (2.7L, 3.4L and 4.0L). Now it's the Camry.....you tell me.

Again, Chevy small block is a "car derived" engine, same for the 22RE.....
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top