"TrailTop" modular trailer topper building components

screwball48

Explorer
Thank you very much.

If you're interested in a chuck wagon kit, what would you be willing to pay for a kit? Would you build it on top of a Dinoot....
The chuckwagon mounted to a Dinoot appeals to me. Sub $1k pricing would be best.



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ITTOG

Well-known member
Thank you very much.

If you're interested in a chuck wagon kit, what would you be willing to pay for a kit? Would you build it on top of a Dinoot tub or not?

And for those looking at my earlier post about the cost of producing an 8' corner rail, the costs listed are just for the production of the single part. Assuming a company selling the TrailTop parts paid a fiberglass shop to make the parts for them, the base cost of an 8' part would of course include the labor to make it plus the overhead/profit requirements of the fiberglass shop. Then you'd have to add the overhead/profit of the company selling the parts, and amortization of the cost of producing the production molds to make the parts. The molds I have are prototype molds, suited for a limited number (dozens probably) of parts, but more robust molds need to be made for production. A good rule of thumb for the cost of a production mold for a part like the one we're talking about is 5-6x the selling price of the part that would be made in that mold, so a percentage of the cost of the mold needs to be added to theretail price of the part to account for the cost of the mold. With all that added in, it turns out that a part that costs $25 in materials plus some labor would end needing to sell for a multiple of that, depending on overhead/profits of the fiberglass shop and the selling shop and mold ammortization.
So a $25 part could easily cost a consumer $100 in the end. Maybe $60 - $70 as a best case, for the consumer. I think the low end is very reasonable but at $100 you may be over priced for a lot of people so there would be a lot of missed sales/opportunity.

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jscherb

Expedition Leader
So a $25 part could easily cost a consumer $100 in the end. Maybe $60 - $70 as a best case, for the consumer. I think the low end is very reasonable but at $100 you may be over proceed for a lot of people so there would be a lot of missed sales/opportunity.
It's not a $25 part. It's a part that takes $25 in raw materials to produce, but all of the other costs involved are real costs that do have to go into the retail selling price, which means a company couldn't sell it near the low end of your range.
 

ITTOG

Well-known member
It's not a $25 part. It's a part that takes $25 in raw materials to produce, but all of the other costs involved are real costs that do have to go into the retail selling price, which means a company couldn't sell it near the low end of your range.
Sorry I meant as you describe, material only. My prices included labor, marketing, overhead, etc. I can see my low end being difficult for a manufacturer, which is why I have a "best for the"consumer"" statement.

I wouldn't have an issue with $100. I was just seeing to think of the broader market.

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ajmaudio

Adventurer
I don't think 80-100ish for something like an 8' corner is out of line at all... maybe even a touch over 100 would still attract a wide customer base. I think people would realize that parts such as these have some very important benefits for the home gamer:

1- Time savings. Construction using something like this would cut planning and construction time as compared to scratch building. Most of us have far less free time than we would like.. Why spend it all on the fab stage?
2- Mistake/prototyping mistake costs. Using these components really brings the complexity down. You have a "system" that requires very little input to get satisfactory results. Very basic cutting/measuring, no "joinery".
3- Confidence in the quality of the final product. I think most people can look at something like this and be fairly confident that they can actually succeed in producing something that is structurally sound, functional, and looks "finished".
4- Fewer $$ tools and associated fab skills required than some other methods... i.e. welding, metal woking, glassing, molding, etc.

There are certainly other benefits aside from these, but personally I think these are the biggest selling points.
 

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opp

Observer
I think you should look at prices that others charged . The price is $6.00 to 8.oo U.S a run foot for the same are near sides . There full trailer kits out there for $< 600 . Every fiberglass shop make some thing like this . I have found 6 shops that sell this.. I hope you don't price your shelf out of the market . You have great ideals . Too many sell the same . My last build that disappeared was $6.50 a foot hand laid
It dose save a lot of time that something .
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
I think you should look at prices that others charged . The price is $6.00 to 8.oo U.S a run foot for the same are near sides . There full trailer kits out there for $< 600 . Every fiberglass shop make some thing like this . I have found 6 shops that sell this.. I hope you don't price your shelf out of the market . You have great ideals . Too many sell the same . My last build that disappeared was $6.50 a foot hand laid
It dose save a lot of time that something .
If you've got links to any similar products or kits please post them so people can compare.
 

opp

Observer
As I may big maybe become a retailer my shelf. That put a hold on posting who and where. You ask what prices should be. I won’t post where I receive my railing on your posting that not be right
 
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