Trailer suspension Options pros/cons

Timbren Suspension or Cruisemaster Suspension preferred

  • Single axel with leaf springs

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    6
  • Poll closed .

stevo_pct

Active member
Perhaps the photos don't do it justice but the Expedition has *substantially* more interior storage space.
Thanks for that info. I wish I could see one in person. If I get the chance, I'll post some pics here of the interiors of both models from their websites.
 

4000lbsOfGoat

Well-known member
Thanks for that info. I wish I could see one in person. If I get the chance, I'll post some pics here of the interiors of both models from their websites.
The side to side and top to bottom measurements are going to be similar, and thus look similar in pics, but the space is much deeper in the Expedition.
 

stevo_pct

Active member
The side to side and top to bottom measurements are going to be similar, and thus look similar in pics, but the space is much deeper in the Expedition.
I was just looking at that online. It seems like the inner dimensions are almost exactly the same.

Here's what Off Grid gives for the Expedition 2.0 interior dimensions: 46 1/8" H x 80" L X 56 5/8" W
Here's the Boreas XT: 45" H x 79" L x 57" W

So they're almost identical, except for maybe an inch.
 

Timbren

Supporting Sponsor
I am looking at two similar trailers and hoping for advice. Both trailers look like well built excellent options. Is there a reason to choose one over the other based on the Timbren versus Cruisemaster suspensions?

Timbren suspension trailer- Off-Grid Trailer Expedition 2.0 https://offgridtrailers.com/expedition-off-road-camper/
Cruisemaster suspension trailer- Boreas-xt https://boreascampers.com/boreas-xt/

Any advice or experience would be appreciated.
Jason,

Stoked to see you are considering a Timbren equipped trailer! Both Off-Grid and Boreas make incredible options! As far as choosing between the two trailers, get the one that suits your needs and budget best. Can't go wrong with either suspension, some things to consider about our Timbren Axle-less kit, is that we are using a large rubber "spring" rather than a traditional shock/spring combo. This allows for extra ground clearance, a comfortable ride, easily serviceable parts, and a long-lasting, reliable system. We also offer a lifetime warranty for our suspension systems to top it off. Can't speak about the Cruisemaster suspension as we don't have much experience with it but looks like a very well built system. Hope this helps!

Feel free to check out our website for more information! Click here.
 

ScottReb

Adventurer
And I will add that Timbren's customer service has been amazing! We've spent time talking with their engineers and they have been incredibly helpful. We work with many international manufacturers and Timbren has been top notch.
 

4000lbsOfGoat

Well-known member
I was just looking at that online. It seems like the inner dimensions are almost exactly the same.

Here's what Off Grid gives for the Expedition 2.0 interior dimensions: 46 1/8" H x 80" L X 56 5/8" W
Here's the Boreas XT: 45" H x 79" L x 57" W

So they're almost identical, except for maybe an inch.
That seems to be total indoor area, not the area of the storage compartments....
 

stevo_pct

Active member
That seems to be total indoor area, not the area of the storage compartments....
OK thanks, that's where I was getting confused. I wasn't sure if you were talking about interior storage only (within the sleeping cabin only), or total storage of all compartment and boxes on the units.
 

tatanka48

Active member
whichever way you go i'd recommend getting a suspension w/ an axe fitted w/ EZ-LUBE SPINDLES

they are available on axles from several manufacturers

they can be identified by their dust cap which typically has a rubber plug in the end

th.jpeg

pop the rubber cap out and there is a grease zerk on the end of the spindle itself

using a grease gun you lube the bearings and keep the hub cavity full at all times

the grease goes in thru the center of the spindle and exits between the rear seal and the inside bearing

then it flows thru the inner bearing filling the hub and oozing out thru the outer bearing

this process keeps fresh grease in your bearings and the older grease comes out the dust cap where it can simply be wiped away

EZ_Lube_Grease_6-2011.jpg

keeping the hub full of grease prevents water and dirt intrusion

lubing once /season and prior to any major event will keep you rolling w/ freshly greased bearings for years to come

i jack the tire off the ground and spin it

if i don't hear any growling i simpy grease the nipple until i get clean grease coming from around the spindle nut

while at it i remove my lug nuts n clean the threads on the bolts and in the nuts then spray my favorite rust preventitive on the threads and replace the nuts torquing them by hand with the lug wrench i carry in the truck so i am sure i can get them back off if needed

i use that blue/green boat trailer wheel bearing grease in all my trailers and farm implements

the last time i found myself on the side of the road w/ bearing issues was in the mid 1970's just before i started this regime

i also do this with each new trailer/axle i get replacing unknown grease with stuff i know i can count on

i just start pumping the blue/green stuff in and the original stuff comes out

in this case the stock grease was red stock grease coming out.jpg and got replaced w/ blue/green green grease coming thru.jpg

i hope this helps

"T"
 

billiebob

Well-known member
We are designing a trailing arm suspension with a beam axle, airbags, and shocks. We think it will give us the best of independent and traditional beam styles.
Looking forward to this system.
Will it be easy to retrofit on a solid axle and leaf spring suspension.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
whichever way you go i'd recommend getting a suspension w/ an axe fitted w/ EZ-LUBE SPINDLES

they are available on axles from several manufacturers

they can be identified by their dust cap which typically has a rubber plug in the end

View attachment 703063

pop the rubber cap out and there is a grease zerk on the end of the spindle itself

using a grease gun you lube the bearings and keep the hub cavity full at all times

the grease goes in thru the center of the spindle and exits between the rear seal and the inside bearing

then it flows thru the inner bearing filling the hub and oozing out thru the outer bearing

this process keeps fresh grease in your bearings and the older grease comes out the dust cap where it can simply be wiped away

View attachment 703064

keeping the hub full of grease prevents water and dirt intrusion

lubing once /season and prior to any major event will keep you rolling w/ freshly greased bearings for years to come

i jack the tire off the ground and spin it

if i don't hear any growling i simpy grease the nipple until i get clean grease coming from around the spindle nut

while at it i remove my lug nuts n clean the threads on the bolts and in the nuts then spray my favorite rust preventitive on the threads and replace the nuts torquing them by hand with the lug wrench i carry in the truck so i am sure i can get them back off if needed

i use that blue/green boat trailer wheel bearing grease in all my trailers and farm implements

the last time i found myself on the side of the road w/ bearing issues was in the mid 1970's just before i started this regime

i also do this with each new trailer/axle i get replacing unknown grease with stuff i know i can count on

i just start pumping the blue/green stuff in and the original stuff comes out

in this case the stock grease was red View attachment 703065 and got replaced w/ blue/green View attachment 703066

i hope this helps

"T"
EZ LUBE is cool technology but all my trailers have maintenance free sealed bearings on 3500# axles with leaf springs.
Over 100,000 miles on my work trailer with zero maintenance over 12 years.
I like the sealed bearings since I tow all winter thru slush and salt.

DSCN2246.jpg
 

ScottReb

Adventurer
Looking forward to this system.
Will it be easy to retrofit on a solid axle and leaf spring suspension.
Unfortunately, it won't work easily as a retrofit. If there is interest, we could offer it as a stand alone, bolt-on system. Specify the track and frame width and done. For our production, it will be welded, but very easily could be bolt-on. Finishing up CAD work and hopefully have a demo roller in a few months.
 

tatanka48

Active member
EZ LUBE is cool technology but all my trailers have maintenance free sealed bearings on 3500# axles with leaf springs.
Over 100,000 miles on my work trailer with zero maintenance over 12 years.
I like the sealed bearings since I tow all winter thru slush and salt.

View attachment 703255
billiebob, i am confused

w/ magnification of the picture you attached yours appears to have the rubber plug in the dust cap just like the axle spindles i was mentioning(see my attachment)

pop that rubber plug and i wonder if you will find a grease zerk

i have been building and towing trailers since the mid 1960's and never heard of the maintenance free sealed bearings

that doesn't mean someone hasn't snuck something by me fer durn sure

i do see stuff on this forum that are new to me frequently

technologies are advancing at light speed these days

"T"
 

Buddha.

Finally in expo white.
whichever way you go i'd recommend getting a suspension w/ an axe fitted w/ EZ-LUBE SPINDLES

they are available on axles from several manufacturers

they can be identified by their dust cap which typically has a rubber plug in the end

View attachment 703063

pop the rubber cap out and there is a grease zerk on the end of the spindle itself

using a grease gun you lube the bearings and keep the hub cavity full at all times

the grease goes in thru the center of the spindle and exits between the rear seal and the inside bearing

then it flows thru the inner bearing filling the hub and oozing out thru the outer bearing

this process keeps fresh grease in your bearings and the older grease comes out the dust cap where it can simply be wiped away

View attachment 703064

keeping the hub full of grease prevents water and dirt intrusion

lubing once /season and prior to any major event will keep you rolling w/ freshly greased bearings for years to come

i jack the tire off the ground and spin it

if i don't hear any growling i simpy grease the nipple until i get clean grease coming from around the spindle nut

while at it i remove my lug nuts n clean the threads on the bolts and in the nuts then spray my favorite rust preventitive on the threads and replace the nuts torquing them by hand with the lug wrench i carry in the truck so i am sure i can get them back off if needed

i use that blue/green boat trailer wheel bearing grease in all my trailers and farm implements

the last time i found myself on the side of the road w/ bearing issues was in the mid 1970's just before i started this regime

i also do this with each new trailer/axle i get replacing unknown grease with stuff i know i can count on

i just start pumping the blue/green stuff in and the original stuff comes out

in this case the stock grease was red View attachment 703065 and got replaced w/ blue/green View attachment 703066

i hope this helps

"T"
I do a lot of trailer bearing repacks at work. We always do it the old way.

I’ve seen the quick lube style blow grease out the seal and contaminate the brakes. There’s no way to see that without taking it all apart.
 

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