Toyota guy looking at making a switch to a LR

dwvninety

Observer
I would go for the LR3.

For your original budget, ( not sure if sticking a ring on a finger has dented that or not. Congrads regardless :D ) you can get a nice LR3, V8 with HSE trim and HD package. Will have plenty of cash left over to go round the car, fixing any wear and tear items it will have, like any used car has, regardless of make or model. This will get you a superb base to start your modifiying needs and desires.

The basic car is very capable for off roading plus it has the ability to munch miles like an executive saloon. It's pretty quiet, comfortable riding on the road, has a great sound system and you can arrive anywhere not feeling like you have endured a long drive. Plus it has huge space in it. The boxy nature of the car gives a large boot, the 2nd row seats can fold flat to create a huge open space.

Plenty of companies can cater for underbody protection, sliders, rear wheel carriers, roof racks, snorkels, height rods, tyres, wheels etc.

One of the best things is you can alter, or sort most electrical huffs with an iid tool that can connect to your ipad.

Nwoods on the Lucky8 LR3 thread has a superb off road guide to getting the most from it.
I have written a pretty comprehensive buyers guide for what to check.

The LR3 platform is 10 years old now, all the quirks are well documented online, with guides to fix and rough costs. It's very easy to work on and most mechanical parts have good access.

I have no regrets about buying mine 2 years ago. It's been a great car and has never failed to get me home, regardless of weather conditions.
If your lucky enough to find an HSE with HD option.
 

A.J.M

Explorer
I don't how the US market for availability of it, we didn't get packages in the UK. Is it just the diff and a towbar?
If so, you can buy towbars and electrics anywhere. Mine now has the electrics as I found genuine parts going cheap from a dealer.
I only know of 1 D3 and 1 D4 with the active rear diff. The 4 has it due to the first owner ticking the £750 box.
The D3 has it because it's a genuine 08 G4 D3 ( I love that car )

You could alway do what Expo have done with their LR4 and fit aftermarket stuff.
 

Mack73

Adventurer
I don't how the US market for availability of it, we didn't get packages in the UK. Is it just the diff and a towbar?
If so, you can buy towbars and electrics anywhere. Mine now has the electrics as I found genuine parts going cheap from a dealer.
I only know of 1 D3 and 1 D4 with the active rear diff. The 4 has it due to the first owner ticking the £750 box.
The D3 has it because it's a genuine 08 G4 D3 ( I love that car )

You could alway do what Expo have done with their LR4 and fit aftermarket stuff.
The HD package include the active rear diff and a full size spare. It is rare in the US but much more attainable than it sounds in the UK. I've got it on mine and in our local Land Rover group there are 3 more. Not many people/dealers ordered it, but if you keep the search up you should be able to track 1 down. It seems a lot of them are on the west coast (California, Oregon, WA and some more in Colorado).
 

A.J.M

Explorer
It's very rare in the UK to find one with the Rear diff. Most models come with a spare that's the same size though.
From reading, it makes things easier but a non equipped model will still go all the same places.
The G4 has never went anywhere i haven't got.

Shame you can't buy and import a LHD G4 model. Would be the envy of the US Landy world.
 

spikemd

Explorer
LR3 is very nice on road and competent offroad with mild modifications. If you want to do challenging trails, then there is much more aftermarket support and you can build up a D2 to handle serious trails. The LR3 requires lots of underbody protection that is readily available, but can be pricey. The electronic traction control is pretty amazing on the LR3 and even better with the HD electronically locking rear diff but you can also buy an ARB truly locking rear diff now.

My buddy has a 100 series, but it is seriously boring. I have a 2003 4runner which has been relatively reliable (replaced transfer case and seized brake calipers) but it just doesn't have any soul. I didn't hesitate to take my 2001 P38 Range Rover to Baja because I know the vehicle inside and out. I also own an LR3 (mild lift, 32 inch tires) that is great for mild trails, but can't handle the trails my range rover can tackle (5 inch lift, 33 inch tires).

First and foremost, drive each truck you are interested in. One will talk to you. You may actually prefer an L322 or RRC. It sounds like you are already interested in an LR and have the technical knowhow to work on it. You won't be disappointed heading into ownership with the right mindset.

Toyota sold over 150,000 tacomas EACH year versus around 15,000 Discos in the late 90s and less than 7,000 a year for the range rovers in the 90s. Hence, you are looking at a small production vehicle, not mass produced.
 

johnnieutah

New member
In response to the OP:
If you want to be with a passionate group of people that don't always drink cheap beer and certainly enjoy expeditions and overlanding in their non-solid axle vehicles that may be bit outta range of the more "country" people...look no further than the 100 series Land Cruiser community. Throw in a dash of "solid axle people" and it just gets better with the earlier 80 series family and more. If that is still too blue collar for you get yourself into the 200 series.

Go Land Cruiser. Reliability is unquestioned. Part availability and support is world wide. Going out to explore is optional but returning home is mandatory.
 

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