Titan Trail Trekker II and AEV Fuel Caddy Condensation?

dmulk

Member
Hey all,

Apologies if this is in the wrong sub-forum. It seemed like a toss up between "Storage Solutions" and "Recovery Gear". I found fuel related storage discussions in both.

So, I recently stumbled over this video and after reading some posts on different sites, I'm wondering how much of an issue this is for people?


I have a Trail Trekker II and have noticed my tank seems to build a bit of pressure (which cracking the cap releases). Should a vented cap operate like this? (My CARB compliant rotopax behave similarly FWIW).

Anyway, the reason I bring this up is that some of the posts I've read around condensation seem to make the claim that if a tank is "properly vented" condensation isn't a problem no matter how little fuel is in the canister.

Any input / debate would be appreciated.

Thanks!

Dan
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
I don’t own one, but I do have a firm belief that driving around with an empty gas container is ridiculous.

Everyone lives their own truth, and I’m sure this guy is really getting water in his tank, but if you keep it full of gas, I would imagine there is no condensation. If you live in Florida, as one would believe that license plate indicates, and you drive around with a vented fuel cap, you are likely to get wet air into your tank. That could condense at night and not re-vaporize the next morning. There is also the possibility that he is getting car wash or rain water in somehow… but I wouldn’t worry about it, or carry an empty fuel tank.

Notice he doesn’t say how long it takes to build up that much water, and he doesn’t actually measure the water, just makes a splash on the ground.

As far as jerry cans and rotopax, they shouldn’t vent or condense. There is always a little pressure when you open them, if you live in the hot southwest desert, it can be insane gas-fountain inducing pressure when you open them! I usually wait until dark if I’m going to open my wavian cans at high altitude in the summer, as it usually reduces the spray.

An additional thought: “Properly Vented” probably indicates some sort of check valve to only release pressure or vented through a charcoal canister to the engine, like your regular tank.
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
@Dan Grec Curious if you've had any of these issues with yours. I believe you used one during your Africa trip?
I used the Trail Trekker for 3 years straight around Africa, including leaving it full to the brim for about a month from Djibouti to Egypt (through Ethiopia and Sudan) in case of shortages, and never had a single problem with it.

I swapped to an AEV Caddy in mid 2019 (I wanted to compare and contrast the differences), and it also has been 100% trouble free.

-Dan
 

dmulk

Member
I used the Trail Trekker for 3 years straight around Africa, including leaving it full to the brim for about a month from Djibouti to Egypt (through Ethiopia and Sudan) in case of shortages, and never had a single problem with it.

I swapped to an AEV Caddy in mid 2019 (I wanted to compare and contrast the differences), and it also has been 100% trouble free.

-Dan
Very much appreciate the reply, Dan. Yeah, this seems to be the only video I've seen of any condensation issues.

I picked up and installed a Trail Trekker II about a month ago. Easy install. The first tank they sent me had some cosmetic issues that looked like were caused in shipping. I mentioned it to them more as an inquiry as to whether it was structural or not and they basically said "let's not take a chance". They sent me a call tag and shipped out a replacement almost immediately.

The follow up from the company was amazing.

Safe travels.
-Dan (also)
 

billiebob

Well-known member
Water vapour is natural in the air. Once cooled it becomes water..... think frost/dew on the windshield. in a tank it never leaves the tank. Hence in winter climates you NEEDED gasline antifreeze. I think new cars have ways to manage this with a charcoal filter but in the 1980s and before, condensation in the gas tank was ALWAYS an issue. The solution ..... KEEP the tank FULL of gas.

Keep the gas tank full. No air, no water vapour to condense.

Altho this is not an AEV design issue I agree, screw the cap tight on a Jerry can it'll expand and contract like crazy but it'll be sealed against water vapour.

Not sure but the black plastic which will attract more heat might make the issue worse.
 
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shays4me

Adventurer
Dan,
I bought a used Jeep for my wife recently that had the AEV tank installed. It didn't have an ounce of water in it and it did have some sun fade so it was not very new. The Jeep came from BC and then it was imported to Everett for a while. I think that if condensation was a real problem with these things it definitely would have had some water in it. It didn't have even a hint of gas smell so I doubt it was ever used. She had me remove the tank from her Jeep. I installed it on mine for a week but hated how little I could see out the back window, especially since my J30 top doesn't have the rear window option. Also I'd recently installed an LRA 60 liter auxiliary tank I feel it would be overkill to have that much capacity. I watched the video you're describing and think the issue must be where he's at. SoCal doesn't get that kind of moisture so I wouldn't sweat it.
 

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
If water is an issue after a first use or not having the cap on tight just throw in a bottle or two of dry gas.
 

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