Tired of all the "huge" RTT's. So I made my own.

I am impressed and intrigued by your. Build. I have a few more questions. How is the frame made ? I recently saw something called 80/20. Basically extruded aluminum thank you can attach to each other to build stuff. Yours looks different from 80 20 is it also extruded aluminum ? Is the frame of the tent welded? Can you share any photos of the production process. I have a Jeep jlur soft top. Thanks
 

JJBiggs

Supporting Sponsor | SEES
I am impressed and intrigued by your. Build. I have a few more questions. How is the frame made ? I recently saw something called 80/20. Basically extruded aluminum thank you can attach to each other to build stuff. Yours looks different from 80 20 is it also extruded aluminum ? Is the frame of the tent welded? Can you share any photos of the production process. I have a Jeep jlur soft top. Thanks

Thank you for your interest.

Very familiar with 80/20. Cool product. Depending on the profile, it can become quite heavy when used in quantity for framing, etc. Regarding your Jeep - you will need an exoskeleton / exo-frame type of rack. Nothing can be mounted to soft top.
 
What can you tell us about the frame and construction. Are those composite panels on the bottom? Is the frame welded aluminum or something else that I have never heard of? Most of us can’t weld aluminum. If this is to invasive pardon me. But I am a curious. Sort and have some ideas about avoiding an exo skeleton for my Jeep. I would appreciate any insight you can provide. Pm if you want. Thanks
 

JJBiggs

Supporting Sponsor | SEES
RTTx Update: Product testing is winding down.

-- RESULTS! --

The RTTx has been tested in some of the harshest weather conditions imaginable. From hail to monsoon rains, high winds, and of course hot conditions, the RTTx has done its job brilliantly.

MPG results - numerous long trips have been completed. We have logged results with a 2016 4Runner Trail (modified). Average mpg's from 4 trips (loaded) have been 16.5 to 18 mpg. (results varied due to hills, weather, and traffic).

The prototype mounting solutions have worked out tremendously well. The older vehicles with direct mounting were the lowest, while the 4Runner's mounting has been simple and allows the vehicle to maintain it's stock accessories (Ex: Sat radio antenna).


-- MOUNTING --
The RTTx has been designed to work with off-the-shelf rack mounting systems from Rhino Rack. Namely - the Rhino Rack Backbone. All modern / present day vehicles utilizing this system will do so moving forward. It presents an easy, yet solid solution and works extremely well.

For those running older vehicles: The RTTx will be a custom option, specific to your vehicle. Vehicle examples include older FZJ80's, 100's, etc. The tents will be direct mount ONLY to provide the lowest profile / lightest solution.

Rack mounting: The RTTx has been designed to be a lightweight, low profile RTT solution. Therefore, while rack mounting is possible, it will not be recommended. Accessory mounting will be available directly on the tent itself. (Awnings, Maxtrax, etc). Reasoning - the rack alone adds substantial weight above the COG as well as preventing the slipstream airflow....which in turn lowers your MPG's.

Bed Racks: The RTTx will work perfectly with bed racks. More to come...


-- MATTRESS OPTIONS --

We are aiming for 3 options of mattresses. We are presently testing custom foam, NEMO Equipment's Cosmos and the Exped MegaMat inflatable. Each would represent a Good, Better, Best scenario and will be an individual choice at purchase.


-- FABRIC CHANGE --
We have determined the fabric tested is overkill for what the tent actually needs. Simply put - a RTT does not need to be a Poly-Cotton canvas. Why you ask? Modern Poly-ripstop fabrics are lighter, more robust and offer the same amount of ruggedness. Having 32lbs of just fabric makes little sense. Look for future updates we move forward on this.


-- COLOR CHANGE --
The framing will now be an anodized silver with white panel infill. Reason - silver anodizing will result in a longer lasting finish, and the color will be a better reflector of heat. If a custom color is needed - vehicle wrapped vinyl is recommended.

Fabric colors: Custom rainfly color options will be available down the road. For the immediate future, the rainfly color will be standard.

That's all for now...more to come soon.
 

highwest

New member
Do you feel like telling more about your decision to go with a poly rip stop? I have always been curious why poly was good enough for the tents used by teams to mount Everest (or similar), but overlanders are married to canvas and other heavy fabrics.
 

JJBiggs

Supporting Sponsor | SEES
Do you feel like telling more about your decision to go with a poly rip stop? I have always been curious why poly was good enough for the tents used by teams to mount Everest (or similar), but overlanders are married to canvas and other heavy fabrics.
Sure...happy to. The simple answer - modern fabrics have come a long way in terms of being UV stable, waterproof / breathable, and being tough as nails in harsh conditions. We came to this conclusion because this RTT is not a ground tent that is to be rolled up, deployed on the ground (i.e. sharp objects, etc). It simply doesn't need the same level in almost every area. What we are aiming for is the following:

- Modern, tough tear resistant Poly blended ripstop.
- Waterproof or at the very least a DWR fabric.
- Does not shrink / change when wet
- UV stable
- Lightweight is key (present poly blend is 32 lbs)
- Holds up in heavy winds...

Because a RTT setup is so easy, and the fact that the fabric is housed within a sealed container - means it's protected. Whereas poly-cotton ground tents need thick heavy-duty fabrics for deployment on various ground based conditions.

Hope that helps... a lot has gone into this. And we really hope to bring a game changer to the overland industry.
 

eatSleepWoof

Explorer
I have always been curious why poly was good enough for the tents used by teams to mount Everest (or similar), but overlanders are married to canvas and other heavy fabrics.
I'd bet the factor is weight. The truck won't care about an extra 50lbs of canvas weight (vs poly), but those climbing Everest weigh their gear in grams, not tends of pounds.
 

ArmyofMike

New member
These RTT are so badass! They are functional, lower profile/center of gravity, minimalist and look great! I really like the look at low profile compared to the Turtle Shell RTT I see nowadays. Are you actually selling these, or plan to in the future?

Great work!
 

JJBiggs

Supporting Sponsor | SEES
I'd bet the factor is weight. The truck won't care about an extra 50lbs of canvas weight (vs poly), but those climbing Everest weigh their gear in grams, not tends of pounds.
Sorry...I disagree. Weight is a significant factor. Example: 20lb wheels with 40lb tires versus 32lb wheels and 50lb tires. Which will have the better handling, suspension action and get the best gas mileage?

Every pound added to a vehicle has a negative effect. My design philosophy = simple, lighter with the same or better results = best solution.

After hauling off road trailers, I have reduced and adapted my entire setup into my 4Runner with a fraction of the weight. I went from 12-14 mpg's to now an average of 17.4 mpg's loaded.

I could go on. Weight is not a vehicle's friend.
 

JJBiggs

Supporting Sponsor | SEES
These RTT are so badass! They are functional, lower profile/center of gravity, minimalist and look great! I really like the look at low profile compared to the Turtle Shell RTT I see nowadays. Are you actually selling these, or plan to in the future?

Great work!

Hello Mike - yes...we are ramping these up for sale. Please feel free to visit the temp Facebook page while things get ramped up. http://www.facebook.com/terrapod
 

eatSleepWoof

Explorer
Sorry...I disagree. Weight is a significant factor. Example: 20lb wheels with 40lb tires versus 32lb wheels and 50lb tires. Which will have the better handling, suspension action and get the best gas mileage?

Every pound added to a vehicle has a negative effect. My design philosophy = simple, lighter with the same or better results = best solution.

After hauling off road trailers, I have reduced and adapted my entire setup into my 4Runner with a fraction of the weight. I went from 12-14 mpg's to now an average of 17.4 mpg's loaded.

I could go on. Weight is not a vehicle's friend.
A tent in (or even ON) the vehicle is not unsprung mass, so your example is completely irrelevant. You will definitely feel a difference of an extra 12lbs of unsprung mass per corner, but you will never feel a difference of an extra 50lbs inside your vehicle, nor will it (in any measurable way) affect handling, suspension, or gas mileage. Weight up high will play some role in very tricky off-road situations, but considering the number of people running 200lb tents on their lifted, oversize-tire equipped vehicles, I'd guess that's not a problem for the average consumer.

I completely agree that overall vehicle weight should be kept in check, and that lower is always better, but arguing about an extra 50lbs of fabric-related weight on a vehicle with a 1000lb+ payload is a pointless exercise.

The post I quoted specifically compared extreme mountaineering vs vehicle-based travel. While weight plays some role in vehicle-based travel, it is exponentially more important in mountaineering. Some 50lbs of weight is 5% of a load capacity for a vehicle with a 1000lb payload. I'd bet that if folks climbing Everest could sacrifice only 5% of their personal weight capacity for a canvas-based tent, most of them would do so in a heartbeat. I know I would.
 
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