Tire gauge/deflator

Rear tires fully aired are at 80psi. My ARB gauge/deflator only goes to 60. Any gauge damage connecting it and dropping pressure down to <60psi? Is there a higher psi product?
 

Mobryan71

New member
Since it's a dial gauge, you risk knocking off the calibration or ruining the gauge entirely. You might be able to replace just the gauge with a higher rated one, or just use some other method to dump the first 20-30 psi, then use the ARB to fine tune it.
 

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outback97

Adventurer

I’m a fan of these. Once you figure out how many psi you drop per minute it’s pretty repeatable in my experience. You could use this to quickly bring it down into your <60 range.
 
Yeah, 80psi:oops:; care to share what your set-up is for wheel and tire size? Just curious as that seems like a lot; what kind of valve stems you running?
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
You can get the stick style tire gauges that go up into the 120-130 range. They are common at truck stops on freeways.

I had a similar problem when I had an F250 and would run it loaded. Most of those stick gauges have a little nub on the back to depress the valve stem. It doesn’t take long to drain 20 or so psi that way.

Personally, I would just do that.
 

MattF350

Observer
I have a tire trek pressure gauge. Goes up to 160psi, can use on DRW. I run my tires at 80psi and needed something more hefty. 275/70r18
 

Laps

Active member
A have the ARB deflator, but prefer the TeraFlex deflators, with a little practice they are just as fast and very easy to use.
 

krick3tt

Adventurer
Wow, 80 PSI, that must ride like a rock. How heavy is your rig?? In my 7800 pound LR3 I only go to 45 PSI in front and 50 in back. Yes I have an
ARB deflator but have not used it yet, previously I used Staun deflators but they no longer work well.
 
Yeah, 80psi:oops:; care to share what your set-up is for wheel and tire size? Just curious as that seems like a lot; what kind of valve stems you running?
2007 Silverado 2500. It currently has rusty steel wheels and balding, old BFG KO tires. It’s getting some OEM Suburban wheels and 235/85-16 Cooper AT3 LT tires. Door sticker is 55psi front and 80psi rear. Currently at 60psi in the rear since it’s empty. Stock size is 245/75-16. The ARB gauge is from my recently departed Tacoma.
 
2007 Silverado 2500. It currently has rusty steel wheels and balding, old BFG KO tires. It’s getting some OEM Suburban wheels and 235/85-16 Cooper AT3 LT tires. Door sticker is 55psi front and 80psi rear. Currently at 60psi in the rear since it’s empty. Stock size is 245/75-16. The ARB gauge is from my recently departed Tacoma.
Ahhhhhh, gotcha, totally makes sense now cuz of the tow rating for the 80psi.....lol. I was like damn! Thanks for the clarification.

I'd contact BFG or Cooper or whatever tire OEM direct on your set-up as they might tell you differently; my set-up on my LR3 is nothing close to OEM door sticker and suggested directly from BFG.......I say suggested as they won't use "quote" for liability as it is not an OEM tire size but they give you suggestions for load ratings. Reason I suggest is that the door stickers are generally for the maxed out vehicle weight so mine is much different than stock; especially with the different tire size. I referred directly to and off BFG and she rides like a dream but my PSI are fairly different than JLR door sticker.

Ride on Amigo!
 
FedEx just delivered a two hose Indeflate tool. Wow. It is very well made. Truly impressive construction. For a deflator that doesn’t remove the valve cores it dropped pressure plenty quick. I’m looking forward to using it at the beach.
 

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