Thoughts on No Boundaries

mekcanix

Camper
Yep I agree it fits that bill
I think they got the size right.
Lots of people looking for that larger than tear drop, smaller than a travel trailer sweet spot
Something you can stand up in, but a bit narrower, bit shorter than the mainstream stick built. Something as a home base for when you are out cycling kayaking hiking etc but want some comforts when you return.
Small enough to get into the better camp spots, but not a hassle to tow
 

XCvagn

New member
The thing that surprises me most about one of the "killer features" of NoBo over an R-Pod is the claim it has an enclosed underside. It does only if you consider the cheap corrugated plastic used for political yard signs being tacked onto the frame as a proper weatherproofing enclosure. All sorts of road debris and water can easily get in there between the gaps of where the tacks. It provides nearly zero additional insulation vs. having an open bottom like an R-Pod. When I saw that great feature improvement I was no longer interested as it really didn't add anything material. The floor plans also don't work for a family of 5 - looking at 19.6 - in winter. The dinette is barely for 3 people.
 

Hilldweller

SE Expedition Society
I think they got the size right.
Lots of people looking for that larger than tear drop, smaller than a travel trailer sweet spot
Something you can stand up in, but a bit narrower, bit shorter than the mainstream stick built. Something as a home base for when you are out cycling kayaking hiking etc but want some comforts when you return.
Small enough to get into the better camp spots, but not a hassle to tow
I want the trailer you're describing, 4 season, and not a piece of crap...

I wish that A-liner made a model with a Cal King bed, rugged enough for forest service roads, and fit in the garage. I've heard that they fall apart on bumpy roads though.
 

Pnwfullsize

Active member
I want the trailer you're describing, 4 season, and not a piece of crap...

I wish that A-liner made a model with a Cal King bed, rugged enough for forest service roads, and fit in the garage. I've heard that they fall apart on bumpy roads though.
Anyone looking for a trailer as described should look into the boreas xt12 that is being released soon. I have the regular xt and build quality is on point.
 

dreadlocks

Well-known member
The InTech Discover is back, with the indoor kitchen all you gotta do is get a propex/wave heater, and some cots and a instead of folding out the beds and it'll do great in all 4 seasons.. I keep the bunks out well below freezing, but if it stayed in single digits there is tons of floor room to sleep on if we needa convert to fully hardsided to make the LP last.

 

Chorky

Observer
The thing that surprises me most about one of the "killer features" of NoBo over an R-Pod is the claim it has an enclosed underside. It does only if you consider the cheap corrugated plastic used for political yard signs being tacked onto the frame as a proper weatherproofing enclosure. All sorts of road debris and water can easily get in there between the gaps of where the tacks. It provides nearly zero additional insulation vs. having an open bottom like an R-Pod. When I saw that great feature improvement I was no longer interested as it really didn't add anything material. The floor plans also don't work for a family of 5 - looking at 19.6 - in winter. The dinette is barely for 3 people.
I think the only way a family of 5 is going to really camp, in the winter, in the same rig, is in a motorhome... I dont think a 'off road' trailer for that large of a family is ever going to actually be off road.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
Check out Hiker Trailers. They are definitely priced and right and seem simple enough to avoid the complication of other much fancier rigs.

Of course nothing new will get you out there this year, every builder seems to have a 6 month lead time. If you want it this year,,, or next spring, shop used.

 
FS Cruise light 2019 24ft camper owner here. We also looked at the Nobo before buying the Cruise light.

Travel trailer was bought new after it sat on the lot for 1 season, got a 50% discount on the price because they are so shotty the campers start rusting out/falling apart after 1 year.
I have been fixing things non-stop and was horrified at the build quality. Honestly it feels un-safe to walk on the roof to do repairs or clean.

I will be selling next spring, and never owning a FS product again. Its worth spending the money if you are going to be using it a lot.
 

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Trikebubble

Adventurer
Look for something used and "regular" in the way of a travel trailer. A number of years ago we bought a Rockwood Mini-lite 1809. It cost us about $10K Canadian and we towed it everywhere with our Xterra. I was pleasantly surprised at how well it held up to forestry and logging roads. I messed with a few little things, upgraded a little here and there, but couldn't have put more than $1K into it, and we sold it for $8500 4 years and a ton of memories later. The only "off-road" attribute it had was a factory lift.
I'd honeslty say to ignore all the current and likely over-priced "off-road" travel trailers and invest a small amount (relatively speaking) in a well cared for used travel trailer. You're investment will be far less, if you bang it up a little it won;t be such a concern, and if you decide it isn't for you, then you haven't sunk a ton of cash into some newfangled trendy off-road trailer that is worth 1/2 what you paid for it the moment you pull it home. Best case scenario, you'll enjoy the heck out of it and if you decide that the life is for you and look to upgrade you can flip your used trailer for not much less than you paid for it.
 

Winterpeg

Member
^ That will work if you stay on actual roads... once you hit a trail and the whole thing slams down on one side when you come down off a rock ledge... I don't have much faith in a "regular" trailer not falling apart.
 

rholbrook

New member
I think the only way a family of 5 is going to really camp, in the winter, in the same rig, is in a motorhome... I dont think a 'off road' trailer for that large of a family is ever going to actually be off road.
Just gotta be creative and realistic in how much space one may need. We are a family of 7 plus usually 2 dogs. We make our modified pop-up work!



It’s a work in progress. But it’s serving us well.


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