Thinking about moving spare closer to hinge

nckwltn

Explorer
I'm thinking about moving the spare tire on the back door over a few inches so it's closer to the hinge. That will give me room to the left of the tire to mount a jerry can and perhaps a high lift.

My plan is to install some horizontal rails into the existing tire carrier holes (I'm aware that the body work behind the tire is recessed), and possibly add some new holes on the left side of the rails where the jerry can will go. The idea will be to get the jerry can right up next to the handle. The spare tire carrier will bolt into the rails and hold the tire.


Doing a little research, I've read some posts on 4x4wire where guys have 35's on the rear door, with out much of an issue. Moving the spare closer to the hinges should help reduce some force on the hinges.


I'll need to take some measurements to see how far over I can actually move the tire before it starts to hit the tail light, but I thought I'd float the idea to see if anyone can think of anything obvious that makes this a bad idea. I know some guys are using an adapter plate to push the tire out away from the door, this will do something similar... and will be adding the weight of a jerry can and high lift.
 

BEG

Adventurer
That sounds like a lot of weight to add to a stamped steel carrier. A full jerry can is about 44 lbs. Your average 48" Hi-Lift is another 30 lbs. I wouldn't want all that weight bouncing around back there. If you want to mount both things without reinforcing the attachment points, I'd probably go with a spare mounted jerry can holder:



...and a hitch mounted Hi-Lift:



Remove the base and mechanism from the jack and store it inside to reduce weight hanging off the bumper and help keep it clean.
 

nckwltn

Explorer
I did some quick eye-ball measurements.... the tire is A LOT closer to the handle then I anticipated...

while I can probably move the tire over to the right ~4 inches, that only gives me ~5 inches between the edge of the tire and the trim around the door handle. Thinking about it last night, there was going to be a lot more room.
 

All-Terrain

No Road Required
As I recall, there is also structure INSIDE the door that is added to support the spare wheel carrier. If you move the carrier off of the original mounting points, you may be hanging all that weight on a weaker/non-reinforced part of the door.

Other trucks with rear door-mounted spare wheels have the same reinforcement. And on trucks like the 80-series Landcruiser or 4Runner/Hilux, they had an optional spare wheel carrier that hung off of the rear corner/fender of the truck... those spare wheel carriers had reinforcing brackets welded to the inner skin of the truck to support that weight.

Best bet is to pull the rear door panel and look inside the door, before you do any drilling etc.
 

nckwltn

Explorer
As I recall, there is also structure INSIDE the door that is added to support the spare wheel carrier. If you move the carrier off of the original mounting points, you may be hanging all that weight on a weaker/non-reinforced part of the door.

I would be using the same wheel carrier mounting structure in the door, mounting rails to that, and then moving the carrier over a few inches and mounting it to the rails.

I think it's going to come down to how much extra weight is everything going to add to the door. I'm actually tempted to hit up a junk yard and hang off of and put some extreme stress on a junked montero's door to see what happens.
 

jeep-N-montero

Expedition Leader
I would be using the same wheel carrier mounting structure in the door, mounting rails to that, and then moving the carrier over a few inches and mounting it to the rails.

I think it's going to come down to how much extra weight is everything going to add to the door. I'm actually tempted to hit up a junk yard and hang off of and put some extreme stress on a junked montero's door to see what happens.
It will add 30-50 pounds as I mentioned, 5 gallons of gas weigh just over 30 pounds and a 48 inch hi-lift weighs just shy of 30 pounds, so almost 60 pounds total. And swinging on a door at the junkyard doesn't compare to the constant stress of miles of driving over bumpy roads.
 

nckwltn

Explorer
...And swinging on a door at the junkyard doesn't compare to the constant stress of miles of driving over bumpy roads.
totally agree... but if my 200+lbs hangs off the edge of the open door and it starts to bend on the hinges... I don't need any miles of bumpy roads to know it's going to fail :)
 

PacS14

Adventurer
Why not just add one of those hitch baskets and be done with it? The basket might come in handy more often than not. At least that is the initial route I'm going with.you could always attach the high lift to the roof rails or roof basket.
 

nckwltn

Explorer
Why not just add one of those hitch baskets and be done with it? The basket might come in handy more often than not. At least that is the initial route I'm going with.you could always attach the high lift to the roof rails or roof basket.
The hitch hangs down and a basket pushing out the back will hit the ground, even on mild trails.

If I had another car with a receiver, I would remove the one from the Montero.
 

PacS14

Adventurer
The hitch hangs down and a basket pushing out the back will hit the ground, even on mild trails.

If I had another car with a receiver, I would remove the one from the Montero.
Sounds like custom bumper time to me. I'm not quite there yet but at least for the rear I plan on making my own when the time comes.
 

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