The best adventure travel boots.

Wow, really? I guess that's why there are lots of brands with lots of styles and fitments.
They felt just super comfortable, I thought I had really found a pair. One day hiking around Canyon lands and the next day my arches hurt so bad I had to lay up a couple days to recover. Rest of the trip I wore a pair of Montrails with no issues. Thought it might have been a fluke so a couple weeks later I wore them on a short day hike, exact same problem. Gave them to a buddy, he loved them. Go figger.
 
They felt just super comfortable, I thought I had really found a pair. One day hiking around Canyon lands and the next day my arches hurt so bad I had to lay up a couple days to recover. Rest of the trip I wore a pair of Montrails with no issues. Thought it might have been a fluke so a couple weeks later I wore them on a short day hike, exact same problem. Gave them to a buddy, he loved them. Go figger.
I wonder if their last favors one type of foot arch over another. I have pretty high arches so I need a little support there. For me, my feet feel pretty secure in them considering they're not really a backpacking boot. I hike in them, of course, but only day hikes (maybe 3-4 miles on average) with a light lumbar pack. I run between 165-170 and am 6' tall so I suppose that could be another factor. They might not offer the right kind of support for a bigger guy. My 20 year son has had a pair for a couple years and he seems to like his as well.
 

Hilldweller

SE Expedition Society
Moabs are a fairly cheaply made boot with an EVA midsole that I can crush in one real hike. I've never met a full-sized hiker that liked them.
I had a pair that I thought was the dog's bullocks ---- broke them in gently around town. Destroyed them on one hike.
It's funny how different the midsoles are between one model to another. I can't kill my Keen Durands over many hard hikes but I killed my Keen Voyagers on one trip.
 
I wonder if their last favors one type of foot arch over another. I have pretty high arches so I need a little support there. For me, my feet feel pretty secure in them considering they're not really a backpacking boot. I hike in them, of course, but only day hikes (maybe 3-4 miles on average) with a light lumbar pack. I run between 165-170 and am 6' tall so I suppose that could be another factor. They might not offer the right kind of support for a bigger guy. My 20 year son has had a pair for a couple years and he seems to like his as well.

6' and probably 235# at the time so maybe Hilldweller is on to something. I had worn the shoes with no issues for a few months with no real problems, but that few months involved no hiking or even long walks. In the following year I developed some foot problems in the form of a neuroma, so in all honesty the shoe may not have been fully at fault, it could have been a confluence of shoe design for my weight and foot problems starting. I switched over to a pair of Saloman GTX and it triggered issues as well. Going on two years of daily wear in a pair of mid ankle Hoka One One Tor Summits. Took some adapting to get used to being an inch taller in them LOL but I like them so well I bought a second pair when they announced they were discontinuing the mid ankle. They use an RMAT midsole (type of EVA I believe) which is also a portion of the outer sole as well with bonded Vibram outer in high wear areas. They were pretty firm for about 6 months then became pretty cushy but havent broken down at all after that. I'm in my second year, and if the upper holds together I should get another year or two from them. Hoka impressed me with comfort enough that I own 4 pair now, challenger, bondi and 2 pairs of tor summits. The challengers have an annoying tendency to sound like Velcro being torn apart with every step on textured concrete. LOL It has more of an RMAT outer sole and they and the Bondi are my nightly walking shoes.


If I am out day hiking, depending on conditions I will be in either the Hoka Tor Summits, Oboz Firebrands or Meindl Gomeras.
 
There are a lot of great quality boots on the market. I feel the most important thing is how they fit YOUR feet. Everyones feet and applications are different. I read plenty of reviews but shopped locally so I could test them. Weight was a big factor for me. Some weighed 3X more than the other contenders. The store where I finally bought them even had a 60 day guarantee so after I broke them in if I wasnt happy I could return them with a full refund.
 
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I have tried Merrill’s,keens and a ton of other lightweight boots over the years 10 months ago I picked up a pair of OBOZ and I am hooked, best fit for me ever. For a heavier weight boot I like Asolo and Danner
 

MCX

TalesFromTheDesert.com
There are a lot of great quality boots on the market. I feel the most important thing is how they fit YOUR feet. Everyones feet and applications are different. I read plenty of reviews but shopped locally so I could test them. Weight was a big factor for me. Some weighed 3X more than the other contenders. The store where I finally bought them even had a 60 day guarantee so after broke them in if I wasnt happy I could return them with a full refund.
Fully agree! Shoes are one thing that you can ask 100 people and you'll get 100 different answers on the best / worst. There's just so much uniqueness that you have to try on different styles & brands to find what works best for you. Shoe material, sole composition, width/narrowness, toe box room, feet size, gait, weight, inserts, types of terrain, climate where you'll be hiking, etc. all come together to determine what works best for you and the type of hiking you do.
 
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