Tembo Tusk Scottle Recipes, Tips and Tricks

#5
Thanks Jerry! Looking forward to some good recipes and getting the word out on this great piece of kit.


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TemboTusk

Rendezvous Con & Sponsor
#6
If you are a pasta lover, this next recipes should peak some interest!

Pasta in the Skottle! This can open up so many comfort food possibilities while camping!

Justin (pictured below) grilled some Italian sausage and set them aside for later use, poured in some "No Boil" pasta and cooked them to perfection and lastly added a meat sauce along with the grilled Italian sausage cooked earlier.


Ahhh, it was good!


Look for Barilla brand pasta at your local supermarket.
 

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TemboTusk

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#8
Any tips on heating and using salt/oil to prep (similar to prepping a Mojoe)? Also cleaning up and storing after use?

Although the TemboTusk Skottle comes pe-seasoned and is ready to cook right away. Should you need to prep or re- season, the operation is very similar to prepping a Dutch oven, cast iron pan or a Mojoe Griddle. Like a Dutch oven, the more the Skottle is used the more non-stick the the pan will be.

To clean or prep the Skottle; lightly wipe the pan with cooking oil and scrub the cooking surface using rock salt. If the Skottle has burned on crud; bring plain water to a boil in the Skottle and let it sit for thirty or forty minutes. Scrape the crud with a wooden spatula or spoon and discard the water. Repeat the oil and rock salt procedure.

To re-season like new; scrub the pan with a steel wool pad to remove any debris, rinse with water and dry. With a paper towel or rag, lightly wipe both sides of the pan with cooking oil. ( Do not over oil as it will cause a sticky mess.) Use a paper towel to soak up any extra oil. Place the Skottle in an oven or BBQ grill and heat to 450-500 degrees for 25 minutes or until the oil stops smoking. Re-season as often as you like.

When you are ready to store the Skottle, wipe both sides lightly with cooking oil and use a paper towel to soak up any excess oil. If the Skottle develops a little bit of rust: Use the oil and rock salt procedure to refresh. :chef:
 
#9
I will vouch for the fact that these are awesome. They are made just a few doors down from our workshop in Fullerton. One other thing you can do: Use it like a wok. The burner puts out enough heat to make Mongolian BBQ, stir-fry and lots of other stuff work.

Arclight
 
#10
Great tips! What oil do you recommend? I prefer to cook with olive oil but not sure that is the best for prepping or prior to storing.


Although the TemboTusk Skottle comes pe-seasoned and is ready to cook right away. Should you need to prep or re- season, the operation is very similar to prepping a Dutch oven, cast iron pan or a Mojoe Griddle. Like a Dutch oven, the more the Skottle is used the more non-stick the the pan will be.

To clean or prep the Skottle; lightly wipe the pan with cooking oil and scrub the cooking surface using rock salt. If the Skottle has burned on crud; bring plain water to a boil in the Skottle and let it sit for thirty or forty minutes. Scrape the crud with a wooden spatula or spoon and discard the water. Repeat the oil and rock salt procedure.

To re-season like new; scrub the pan with a steel wool pad to remove any debris, rinse with water and dry. With a paper towel or rag, lightly wipe both sides of the pan with cooking oil. ( Do not over oil as it will cause a sticky mess.) Use a paper towel to soak up any extra oil. Place the Skottle in an oven or BBQ grill and heat to 450-500 degrees for 25 minutes or until the oil stops smoking. Re-season as often as you like.

When you are ready to store the Skottle, wipe both sides lightly with cooking oil and use a paper towel to soak up any excess oil. If the Skottle develops a little bit of rust: Use the oil and rock salt procedure to refresh. :chef:
 

TemboTusk

Rendezvous Con & Sponsor
#11
I also prefer to cook with olive oil and I have seasoned with olive oil in the past. However, I now use pure vegetable or soybean oil for seasoning. It is a much more durable coating than olive oil. Again a little goes a long way.
 
#15
I love my cast iron and carbon steel. I saw the skottle at expo east this weekend, but didn't have a lot of time to go through it in detail. Can you give me an idea of how it looks broken down? I'm trying to envision a storage solution in my rig.

Edit - just found the Blue Ridge Overland video on your FB page. Very nice. :cool:
 
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