Swivel shackle recovery rings

Hard to find without paying big bucks. These are new/old stock so might have dust or a shelf scratch but are UNUSED.

USA made. 25,000lbs+ breaking strength. Anodized and magnetically inspected. Tested before being shipped from factory. 100% rating even at 90 degrees. Full 360 rotation.

Waiting on payment for one, so one pair left! $425 new, SELLING FOR $150 pair. Pick up near LA or will ship for $10.
 

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RainGoat

Member
Hard to find without paying big bucks. These are new/old stock so might have dust or a shelf scratch but are UNUSED.

USA made. 25,000lbs+ breaking strength. Anodized and magnetically inspected. Tested before being shipped from factory. 100% rating even at 90 degrees. Full 360 rotation.

Waiting on payment for one, so one pair left! $425 new, SELLING FOR $150 pair. Pick up near LA or will ship for $10.
I’m interested but how do they mount?
 

woytovich

Observer
I thought these were rated for lifting rather than recovery? the difference being potential shock load I guess...

What is the brand/model? If these ARE good for recovery I'll take the pair remaining.
 

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Ok guys, quick lesson on this and industrial rigging gear in general: These are far stronger than the consumer-grade and usually un-tested recovery gear you are buying. They cost over $400 a pair for a reason. Actual lift ratings are far more stringent than any other rating, hence the pre-shipping testing and inspection process. The liability is far higher than for the 4x4 crowd.

These are rated at 5000lbs WLL, which means something very different than the so called "10,000lb+" gear 4x4 shops sell. They are rated a conservative 5:1 safety margin, and that is a real rating, not some assumed figure. Industrial grade rigging gear, used for things like when cranes lift heavy metal panels weighing 1000's of lbs. into the air 200 feet above workers heads, makes your little D-shackle made in China look like costume jewelry.

The next size up for these gets pretty big is more ideal for large rigs like Unimogs, etc.

Implying these are aluminum is pretty funny. 100% USA STEEL. Maybe I used the wrong word for the plating but you can see it in the pic. Someone suggested it was a form of galvanizing. I don't know. Point is, they are rust resistant.

Pass the bolt through a hole and put a big nut on the back. Easy as can be. The bumper pictured has a plate behind the facing of about 1/4 steel. I borrowed an extra large drill bit to make the hole and got a nut from the local hardware store and installed it in a minute.
 
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woytovich

Observer
Thanks for the clarification.
Be aware that your hardware store nut might not be graded high enough for this application. There are specs for the nut on their documentation.
 

woytovich

Observer
I don't know that to be fact BUT a "typical" hardware store nut is not grade 8.
What does Crosby specify for the nut on this?
 

woytovich

Observer
And by the way the 9500# shackle specs I quoted were for Crosby, Made in the USA 3/4" D shackles, not Chinese junk.
I use those specific Crosby shackles exclusively FWIW.
 

woytovich

Observer
And please don't get me wrong, I think these would be/will be great if they are safe in this application... I truly don't know. I am just playing "Safety Officer"!
 
"Playing" is right.

Jesus, it really doesn't matter what grade of nut you use... 5 or 8, same thing in this case. 25 years of 4x4 recovery experience talking.

If someone wants one of the best pieces of recovery gear made, for an amazing deal, let me know via PM.
 

woytovich

Observer

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