Suggestions On Honda CL350

dwh

Tail-End Charlie
Just remember to kick it through a couple times before putting the plugs back.

Better to let the excess exit the plug hole. Otherwise, if there is too much, it can cause the engine to lock if the piston moves up on a compression stroke and the oil stops it from getting to top dead center.

In that case, the engine that kicked through nice and easy suddenly just stops...and you feel like you just broke your ankle.

Don't ask me how I know that either. :)
 

TwinDuro

New member
Great to hear Steinkunde!

After reading through your thread, I believe you are getting some solid advice and I'm glad that your reviving your Dad's old scrambler! When fixed up, fettled with and after a few of the old bike bugs are worked out, it should make a great bike for you to get around on. With less then 7k miles on your Dad's bike, unless there's some problem that warrants it when first reviving it, I would avoid rebuilding the engine unless you find it's absolutely necessary. These engines are pretty bullet proof... Usually upon reviving one, the worst you'll find is that some of the external oil seals and gaskets need replacement. I've been extremely lucky to own a few Honda 350 twins over the years and am always amazed at how versatile they are, especially in the context that the newest one was made 43 years ago... Below is a photo of my dream bike, a heavily modified 1971 Honda SL350 that has come together with a lot of help from my friends:





You're going to have fun and if you have any questions, ask away!
 

SilicaRich

Wandering Inverted
Thought I would give another update on the bike. Took sometime today to really look at it while I am home for break. The more I look at the bike, the better it looks. My dad and I plan to start some tear down the first week I get back for my winter break and start replacing hoses and check the fuel system. Our goal is to get it running before January 1st. Going to also order some new tires. Also happened to come across the original owner's manual in the underseat compartment so that's pretty cool
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Anyone have a recommendation for semi aggressive tires that are relatively tame on the road but work fine on dirt and such? I don't know much about motorcycle tires
 

dwh

Tail-End Charlie
That thing is sweet. Original and unmolested. Gonna need a 50 gallon drum of elbow grease, but totally worth it.
 

SilicaRich

Wandering Inverted
That thing is sweet. Original and unmolested. Gonna need a 50 gallon drum of elbow grease, but totally worth it.
Ohhhhh yeah but I'm looking forward to it. My biggest concern as of now is the surface rust, but that's just because I had bad rust experiences with my old FJ40 and I'm completely overreacting about the issue as it sits. Deciding whether or not I want to repaint the tank later on or just kill the rust and leave the patina but again that's all future things. Didn't realize it had an electric starter but that will likely need to be replaced as well. The general plan to get the everything cleaned and replace one thing at a time until we can get it to start.
 

CCPAJeeper

Observer
Very cool bike. Based on my experience and your description of your dad's storage prep, I don't think getting it going will be that much of a project. As you indicated, replace all hoses. Check the rubber carb boots, they may be dry rotted. Put oil in the cylinders and kicking it over with the plugs out, will help free up the rings and any sticking valves. Change the engine/trans oil. As indicated in a prior post, the oil will aide in initial ring sealing.
Very cool bike, it has a ton of character. Good luck with getting it going. Be optimistic about the bike. Hondas are pretty bullet proof. Appears this one is in good shape, was maintained while previously in use and stored with care.
 
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