Suggestions for Toyota Tundra modifications for suspension and wheels/tire

rpm4463

New member
My family is tired of being bounced around while driving on dirt BLM and FS roads in my Tundra TRD (2014). I'm interested in making modifications to the suspension system including tires and wheels. Currently everything is stock. I've been pleased with it in the past, but since we started pulling overland trailer on rough roads it has definitely made a tougher ride. I have very little (no) experience in after market modifications so I'm looking for suggestions. I don't need anything fancy, just keep it basic and one step above stock components. I've looked on other webpages but would like you'alls input. It currently has 75K miles. Estimate of price would be helpful also.
thanks.
 

Tn jeff

New member
My truck came with cooper at 35 12.5 18 on methods.
I had to remove the mud flaps and get a cmc though to fully turn the wheels.
I’m going to drop down to Toyo At 3 285 75 18 next time.

I had the icon 2.5s rebuilt, With 700 lb coils.
Have about a 2.5” rake.
Deaver leaf springs .
Boss shackles.
Wheelers and timbren bumpstop.
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

Dreaming of Jupiter
by Ted Simon
From $16.29
Don't Go There. It's Not Safe. You'll Die.: And other mor...
by Jared McCaffree, Jessica Mans, Kobus Mans
From $19.99
999 Days Around Africa: The Road Chose Me
by Dan Grec, Dan Grec
From $19.95

rruff

Explorer
The low budget good upgrade is Bilstein 5100 shocks and struts. <$400 plus installation. They use your front springs, but are designed for a modest lift. I'd recommend the lowest or middle setting. Pulling a trailer you probably can use a rear spring upgrade (additional leaf, or?) or maybe airbags if you use it a lot unloaded and want variable capacity. I don't pull a trailer, but there may be something you can do with the hitch and loading to improve things?

I have Hankook ATMs and have no complaints. I think they quit making them. The gas mileage is at least as good as the stock Bridgestones. If you want to use your stock wheels, let me know the size, else let me know what you're after. A modestly larger E rated tire (like a 275/70r18) on stock rims should fit fine, and be a little better offroad.

Airing down on rough roads is one of the best things you can do to smooth the ride.
 

rpm4463

New member
just a follow up question, do the dealerships or private off road shops usually have better deals for installations and modifications? I'll get prices from both but just curious what you'all think. I'm guessing dealerships are more expensive but my possibly have a better warranty?
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
Definitely go for the 5100's, for the money they can't be beat.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
You'll want to check with local shops first. A lot of them won't install any aftermarket parts the customer supplies due to liability. Most places won't offer any sort of warranty on aftermarket products, so don't expect it.
 
I have a 16 TRD Pro and tow an overland trailer too. The rear end sagged a lot due to the soft leaf springs inback. I replaced the leaf kit with Alcan with 600lbs and 2 inches over stock. Now it doesn't sag with full bed and trailer. I noticed a big difference going over washboards unloaded, it was much smoother.
 

beef tits

Active member
just a follow up question, do the dealerships or private off road shops usually have better deals for installations and modifications? I'll get prices from both but just curious what you'all think. I'm guessing dealerships are more expensive but my possibly have a better warranty?
Depends where you are. In Denver they are all expensive. You'll need an alignment too.

Full truck suspension will likely start at $2500 installed, but not for a nice King or BP51 setup, more like low-mid grade. For the good stuff you are looking at $5k+ installed.

You can DIY for much less if you have the tools and know how. Any more, I pay shops to do things simply due to lack of time. I make more money at work than it costs me to pay them to do it.

Depending how your front end reacts, you may end up with some rhythmic humming, and may also need to lower your driveshaft. Tundras have an axle bearing issue up front and most driveshafts don't like an angle change unless you clock the rear-end or drop the shaft a tad. Both are easy to fix, check East Coast Gear Supply for the bushing/seal kit up front, and a million vendors have carrier bearing drops.
 
Top