Stoves??

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
steak in the garage! lol, im going to fully service it and see how i go, but in my head lighting a gas stove has to be easier!
I do the pumping thing and light it, it seems pretty straightforward. (y)

I have dabbled collecting Coleman stuff (mainly lanterns) for a couple years now. Generally if it doesn't work it is old fuel that has dried and is plugging something up or something about a bug blocking airflow. If they build and hold pressure an actual hard part is kinda rare to need replaced. There is a ton of info about how to work on them out there.

But I love tinkering with stuff like this, I use a 1961 200A lantern to monitor how stuff is cooking on my charcoal grille...
 

PeteSinc

New member
I live in UK and I bought a twin burner Partner Stove and Service kit direct from Partner a few years ago. Have you spoken to them direct?

The alternative is a Primus twin burner stove. Also very good.
 

bear100

New member
After years on the standard propane Coleman 2 burner, I got fed up with it after i struggled to get it hot enough for Korean BBQ. Disclaimer, there was some wind, but nothing crazy. It just doesn't like wind, at all.

Purchased a Camp Chef Everest and i'm not looking back. Double the output, push button start, flame control that actually works. Very happy. And it fits where I kept the old stove, barely.
I have seen this stove and it looks pretty good although a little on the big side, but the simplicity of gas is calling me!!
 

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bear100

New member
I do the pumping thing and light it, it seems pretty straightforward. (y)

I have dabbled collecting Coleman stuff (mainly lanterns) for a couple years now. Generally if it doesn't work it is old fuel that has dried and is plugging something up or something about a bug blocking airflow. If they build and hold pressure an actual hard part is kinda rare to need replaced. There is a ton of info about how to work on them out there.

But I love tinkering with stuff like this, I use a 1961 200A lantern to monitor how stuff is cooking on my charcoal grille...
I have a few Coleman dual fuel pieces and they are all trouble, i only use the coleman fuel and im thinking this is where i am going wrong, i am not the type to empty the tanks at the end of usage and the fuel will stay in there until the next season. so it looks like i have a fair bit of time on my hands with the current affairs! off to buy some carb cleaner and servicing kit :)
 

bear100

New member
I live in UK and I bought a twin burner Partner Stove and Service kit direct from Partner a few years ago. Have you spoken to them direct?

The alternative is a Primus twin burner stove. Also very good.
HI, I haven't contacted them direct but will now! they look a really good bit of kit and will last a life time, its the simplicity of gas that does it for me. I have seen the Primus stove but I'm not keen on it. Coleman do a Gladiator which looks ok.
 

bear100

New member
I have encountered some great camp cooks over the years. I am not one of them.

As a single, retired guy my cooking tends to consist of pushing the "on" button on the microwave or firing up the gas BBQ or heading someplace where someone will cook for me.

My camping setup is no more complex - a single burner dual fuel stove and a mini skottle.

My single burner stove can run on 8 oz. butane canisters or 1 lb. propane bottles.



View attachment 573531

https://store.overlandbound.com/products/adventure-skottle-grill-overland-bound-edition

I sourced adapters for my mini skottle so I can run the small 4 oz. butane and all-season fuel blend canisters, the larger 8 oz. butane canisters, or a 1 lb. propane bottle.

Gas Converter,for Butane Canister to Screw Gas Cartridge/Lindal Type Valve Adapter

Jeebel Camp LPG Adapter 1L Propane Small Tank Input EN417 Lindal Valve Output


Nothing fancy, but it packs away neatly and takes up little room. On a recent 3-week overlanding trip to Cabo San Lucas I used 8 oz. butane canisters for both stove and skottle. Worked perfectly.
Im no great chef but enjoy the cooking........well the beer that comes with the chore!! But cooking a nice meal at the end of the day or a hearty breakfast give me satisfaction.
Time always seems to be against me and the faffing with dual fuel just sets me off on one :rolleyes:
Thanks for the info and links (y)
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
I have a few Coleman dual fuel pieces and they are all trouble, i only use the coleman fuel and im thinking this is where i am going wrong, i am not the type to empty the tanks at the end of usage and the fuel will stay in there until the next season. so it looks like i have a fair bit of time on my hands with the current affairs! off to buy some carb cleaner and servicing kit :)
I don't have any dual fuel stuff, all mine is older LOL.

Coleman fuel is really stable, I didn't light my stove myself until a year ago. It still had fuel in it from our '99 Yellowstone family camping trip in it which was the last time it had been ran. It smelled the same as my new fuel so I tried it, I have just added to it since.

I do think Coleman recommends pouring it back in the can and storing it dry though.

EDIT: Not your exact model but this might help:

 
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PSea

Active member
Love my WeberQ BBQ paired w/ the griddle inserts. bbq, griddle & cooktop ...and cleanup is a cinch! close lid. done. ;-)
 

greg.potter

Adventurer
If I were going around the world for an extended period, or going someplace very cold, I'd probably bring the Coleman. For trips up to a week or two in mild weather, I'll stick to the butane. For even a weekend of snow camp, the butane might be fine, but I'd probably have to warm the cartridge up inside my coat before it'd light. (Anything above ~45°F should be fine as-is)
One important consideration is the boiling point of these fuels. Butane boiling point is -1C which means at atmospheric pressure it remains a liquid below -1C. Propane on the other hand has a boiling point of -42C which means you are going to get much better cold weather performance from a propane stove.
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
One important consideration is the boiling point of these fuels. Butane boiling point is -1C which means at atmospheric pressure it remains a liquid below -1C. Propane on the other hand has a boiling point of -42C which means you are going to get much better cold weather performance from a propane stove.
Right, that's exactly why I specifically called out extended cold weather camping as a separate consideration in the post you quoted. For extended cold, butane is maybe the worst choice. But, for a weekend getaway, where I can keep the fuel inside the semi-heated envelope (tent/camper) or warm the canister with body heat for the 2-4 cooks sessions where I actually need them, I may favor my current setup just for convenience. Once lit, catering-style butane stoves are self-heating (there's a heat feedback plate in the stove that transfers heat to the canister), so its really just about getting them to boil enough gas to light them.

Propane is better than butane, but neither beats white gas for cold weather performance. Besides my three Coleman stoves, I also have an old 1990's MSR Whisperlite that I keep specifically for the occasional multiday snow backpacking trip.
 
THIS:
Love my WeberQ BBQ paired w/ the griddle inserts. bbq, griddle & cooktop ...and cleanup is a cinch! close lid. done. ;-)
I don’t have all the inserts and just set a fry pan directly on the grate. Heavy duty foil is your friend, but as CSG mentioned earlier, the size of it is problematic. I use a JetBoil for heating water.
 

PSea

Active member
THIS:

I don’t have all the inserts and just set a fry pan directly on the grate. Heavy duty foil is your friend, but as CSG mentioned earlier, the size of it is problematic. I use a JetBoil for heating water.
guess it depends on your vehicle set up. I've got plenty of room in my forward fold trailer. much rather use the weber griddles (vs foil) that you can buy as an accessory. that way grease is easily dealt with. happy trails!
 

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kennedyma

New member
I have way too many cooking devices, but have come to enjoy the following setup.

I bought a Camp Chef Pro 30 Single Burner stove with the Griddle, it’s amazing. I use it at home and when camping.
I also have a Colman stove with a single burner and grill.
This setup gives us a Griddle, Grill, high powered burner, and a lower powered burner to work with.
 
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