Stoves??

bear100

New member
Stoves! Where do I start.....

I am after your opinions on what stoves you use.
I'm looking for a new setup, I currently use a Coleman dual fuel which when working is great, I also use 2 jetboils mainly for brews, and the cheap single burner as a back up.
The problem with my dual fuel coleman it’s temperamental and a bit of a pain, so I’m thinking of sticking to gas for a quick dime easier life....but which one? We can’t get the Partner stove over in the uk which is a shame and there’s nothing that matches it either.

so let’s see what you got 😁
 

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Buddha.

Lurker
I bought a little butane single burner for a late fall car camping trip. It sucked, wouldn't work. Took me a while to figure out it was too cold at 30F. I had to throw the butane canister on the dash of the truck, wait for the truck to warm up, and then wait for the canister to warm up. Coffee was delayed and we were cold and cranky.
 

VanWaLife

Member
I sure got sick and tired of pumping my Dual Fuel stoves, especially the single burner with a pot of hot water directly above my hand. I added a propane hot water heater to my setup with a 20 pound propane tank, so went for a Coleman fold-and-go propane stove because I liked the size, and it's easy to lock up through the handle. It sure is nice having a built in igniter and no pumping...
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
I hear you. I own 3 Coleman stoves and they're dead reliable, but pumping and priming just to get coffee going is for chumps. I switched to a butane single burner (the asian-market kind originally, then eventually switched to a "dual-fuel" model that also takes a 1lb propane bottle). In the ~6 years I've been using these, I've never had one fail to light on the first turn/click of the knob.

If I were going around the world for an extended period, or going someplace very cold, I'd probably bring the Coleman. For trips up to a week or two in mild weather, I'll stick to the butane. For even a weekend of snow camp, the butane might be fine, but I'd probably have to warm the cartridge up inside my coat before it'd light. (Anything above ~45°F should be fine as-is)
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
I’m using the Camp Chef summit series. I got the slightly nicer than Everest model, the one from REI, and love it. I cannot however, remember the name of that model.

That being said, I do wish a few things about disassembly and cleaning were easier.

curious, why can’t you get the Partner stoves in UK?
 

Inyo_man

Explorer
If you use your stove during "four season" camping (into the winter), I'd stick with the Coleman.
White gas will fire up in all temps., and you can always use fuel from jerry cans if you run out of white gas!
My grandfather's Coleman that I inherited is still running strong...
Cheers
 

Red90

Adventurer
I sure got sick and tired of pumping my Dual Fuel stoves, especially the single burner with a pot of hot water directly above my hand.
You are not using it correctly or your stove is in bad shape. They should never need pumping after they are running.
 

dbhost

Member
Coleman Dual Fuel. Regular Unleaded Gasoline is available pretty much anywhere semi civilized on the planet, super reliable etc...

I have several others, but for anything wandering away from civilization and easy fuel availability, the Coleman gets used...
 

VanWaLife

Member
You are not using it correctly or your stove is in bad shape.
Hmm interesting. I'd be curious to hear other people's experience with this. I have found pumping affects flame quality, particularly for long high demand cooking operations like boiling large amounts of water in poorly insulated pots, and particularly when starting with a full tank. Wikipedia seems to agree with this: "These stoves have a pump to build up initial pressure in the fuel tank, but are generally self-pressurising when running (occasional re-pumping may be necessary if the stove is run at full output)."
Portable Stove Wiki
 

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Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Hmm interesting. I'd be curious to hear other people's experience with this. I have found pumping affects flame quality, particularly for long high demand cooking operations like boiling large amounts of water in poorly insulated pots, and particularly when starting with a full tank. Wikipedia seems to agree with this: "These stoves have a pump to build up initial pressure in the fuel tank, but are generally self-pressurising when running (occasional re-pumping may be necessary if the stove is run at full output)."
Portable Stove Wiki
In my experience, I mostly don't need to re-pump once primed, but if you have a small head-space (full tank), one might need one round of top-up pumping after the stove is running. More than that indicates a problem. But as I said, in the early-morning hours, I'd much rather use butane. Snap, click, done.
 
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