Small full-featured hard-sided stock trailers modified for slow off-pavement trips: surprisingly rare

COTundraTRD

New member
I’ve been looking at the Jayco Hummingbirds. I’m so green to this though, still reading massive amounts of threads like this to figure it out.
 

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Grassland

Well-known member
No thanks. Combined grey/black tank means when it fills up your poop comes up into the shower.

Airstreams aren't what people think they are...
Tight, dumb layouts, low clearance, small tanks, etc. etc.
If you are towing with a Range Rover and staying on the road, buy one and have fun.
Once upon a time when Thor didn't own them, and most likely pre housing bubble recession, Airstreams were something to aspire to.

I've never owned one, but it seems to me that most trailers have gone drastically downhill in the last decade, decade and a half. Regardless of price tag.
 

QQQ

Member
Spend some time on the airforums and read about the quality of a 50k plus camper. Spoiler alert! they are no different in build quality than any other camper, but then again Thor owns AS so not surprised at all.
 
I'm kinda looking for the same thing. Staying a bit limited on pricetag. Things like a black series are out of the question. And on top of that we are limiting it to a "bunkhouse" style thanks to a young/potentially growing family. But I really don't have to worry about weight considering my tow Vic...
So right now I've found only a few options that would require none/minimal modifications. But I'm still looking
NoBo 19.7
Geo Pro g19bh
And outdoors Rv 21dbs (highest price, has a slide out unfortunately, and the nearest dealer is 1200miles away)
 

Brewddha

New member
Subscribed. We're looking for something similar. The Black Series trailers are closest in my book, and can be made 4 season capable after purchase pretty easily from what I've read, but 1) they're expensive, and 2) they're heavy. I expect some extra weight for the ruggedness, but I was surprised. I would love to find something that can follow our 4Runner into the trail just a bit to get to a boondocking spot and be good once there for the better part of a week.

We have tried the RTT approach, not for us. It seems like there are some 14' trailers that conceptually would work with modifications, but it's hard to know how durable the frames are. Looking forward to seeing more of this discussion to see what else is out there that I've missed.

One question for the OP: how is the comfort of the bed that converts from the dinette? That's the biggest concern I have about the small trailers without a dedicated bed, having a pretty bad back and being a little sensitive to bed quality.

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I've been doing a ton more research since my last comment and basically sold myself on an Outdoors RV. they are better built, with much sturdier materials, better suspension, 4 season ready (huge bonus), and much larger tanks. and the ultimate selling point, the wife likes it...
unfortunately with the distance to the nearest dealer, and the added price, it'll have to wait a while thanks to work constraints.
 

Bayou Boy

Adventurer
I've been doing a ton more research since my last comment and basically sold myself on an Outdoors RV. they are better built, with much sturdier materials, better suspension, 4 season ready (huge bonus), and much larger tanks. and the ultimate selling point, the wife likes it...
unfortunately with the distance to the nearest dealer, and the added price, it'll have to wait a while thanks to work constraints.
Make it a habit to do a search on RVT AND RVTrader daily. I found mine while doing a search at breakfast at a dealer in Atlanta. They had posted it an hour before. Got a screaming deal since it isn't something east coast people are looking for.
 
I've been doing a ton more research since my last comment and basically sold myself on an Outdoors RV. they are better built, with much sturdier materials, better suspension, 4 season ready (huge bonus), and much larger tanks. and the ultimate selling point, the wife likes it...
unfortunately with the distance to the nearest dealer, and the added price, it'll have to wait a while thanks to work constraints.
We have a ORV Timber Ridge 23DBS the trailer is very well built for a RV the only thing is it is real tall and heavy. I wish they made an 18ft with bunks20190630_093434.jpg
 

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profdant139

Member
The videos on the ORV site are very persuasive -- they really understand boondocking. Maybe they will realize that there is a significant niche market for little but tough trailers?
 
We have a ORV Timber Ridge 23DBS the trailer is very well built for a RV the only thing is it is real tall and heavy. I wish they made an 18ft with bunksView attachment 530107
Im looking at the Creekside 21DBS. im not too concerned with the weight driving ¾ton diesel and planning on it being more of a base camp. height/length/width are their own problems i already cant do some trails with my Crewcab longbed lol. an under 20ft bunkhouse id be all over.
it doesnt look like the height is much of an issue for you with the canoe and kayaks on the roof.

id likely use it for family visits like holidays and when i can get temporary transfers (6-9months with bonus pay for working at another location). as well as my basecamp. so more thinking on trailer use drives me away from cheaper trailers.
 
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