Slide in Camper Survey

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Very good input so far! Thanks.
Most of the people that showed interest in these type of campers did not want a fully build camper. They where looking for a basic shelter that has heat, washroom, bed, somewhere to sit and make coffee. Pop top was a no go for most. Another big point was the shitty quality and 60's interior design in regular campers.

As for pricing: We are trying to go higher end with the windows and doors than what is currently available. The Stainless corners also ad to the price... In other words, the goal is to offer you something new and fresh with quality components. Our target is around US$11.000 for the kit.

That sounds great. Quality of windows, doors, and walls are way more important to overlanders, not so much to the rv crowd.

I hate how campers have cooktops, ovens, microwaves, TV's, radios, etc. I don't need any of that, and it's all very heavy.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
How open would you guys be to offering CAD of the main structure (interior space mostly) so people could build out the rest of it in CAD? I would be much more inclined to buy something like this if I could load the floorplan in to Fusion360 and design my layout.
I'm open to the idea when we have the measurements finalized.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
In combination with the new slide in camper offering, we are also going to offer our thermal transfer free frp extrusion to anyone that already has panels or likeS to make their own! These extrusions allow for 50mm/2” panels to be joined at a 90 degree angle. The high gel coat content make them uv stable. This means they do not need to be painted. Pictures , drawings and pricing will follow in a couple weeks. This will be huge game changer for anyone wanting to build a camper on a budged.
 

tanuki.himself

Active member
I would definitely make it fit the Ranger/Navara/Hilux narrower European/Australian market if you want to take international sales off people like Bimobile - i would have seriously considered getting a kit shipped over to europe as the basis for my build if it had been available
 

sg1

Adventurer
Overland Explorers Camp-X is $30k for a completely built out unit with insulated pop top. If something like this got too expensive, it wouldn't make any sense for me to just not buy a complete Camp-X.
Overland Explorer now offers the Camp X as a shell and they sell the components too including a Truma. The website doesn´t show any prices.
 

rruff

Explorer
As for pricing: We are trying to go higher end with the windows and doors than what is currently available. The Stainless corners also ad to the price... In other words, the goal is to offer you something new and fresh with quality components. Our target is around US$11.000 for the kit.
I think you'll definitely be in business at that price.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
+1 to no tailgate. Extra weight and complicates getting into the camper.

Do allow for swingout spare tire carriers and bike racks though (not having the camper hanging out like 6" past the tail lights)
 

ITTOG

Well-known member
Given I am building my own at the moment I will jump in with some thoughts. If I had known this was coming I would have bought it. I would have chopped the top and converted it into a pop top though.

  1. Size: For added security we like to keep the main body within the truck bed so you can close and lock the tailgate. At the same time you can use the gate as a “porch”. The downside is the reduced interior space.
    1. I say do not worry about the tailgate. On mine, I removed the tailgate and extended the camper 2' past the end of the bed. The reason is I have a F150 with a 5' 6" bed and have come to realize it is pretty much worthless and if I am going through the effort of building a camper, buying one, it has to be longer than my bed. This of course will be true for most of the smaller trucks. Of course for longer trucks keeping the tailgate may make sense. I think you should build them in varying lengths that do not focus on keeping the tailgate. You can see my build in my signature if you want to see it.
  2. Cab over bed: Our current layout allows for a ~48” deep alcove . This means part of the bed will be a pull out design.
    1. I agree completely with the 48" depth max. That is what I did for my build. The pull out is fine but I am doing a flip up extension. The reason is because I want a single piece mattress and a flip up will push the mattress up and out of the way.
  3. Width: We truly believe that the width should be kept as narrow as possible, following the vehicle outlines. This will allow you to go down narrow trails and also make it easier finding parking in confined spaces. This in return will compromise the interior space…
    1. I made mine to match the width of the truck. I don't want to be driving a narrow trail and have to remember the camper is wider. It is bad enough to remember the height. I think most are this way which is why when pulling a trailer they want its width to match that of the tow vehicle.
  4. Interior height: We need a happy medium. 78” is the current measurement.
    1. That will be a good height for probably 99% of the people looking at these.
  5. Although we think we will hit the mark with smaller trucks like the Tacoma, Ranger, Colorado… We think the more sensible way would be a Gladiator, F150 or bigger to avoid being overloaded…
    1. Seems reasonable.
Since I am building my own I understand the costs associated with it. The majority of the costs in these things are labor, not materials. Thus the costs should be relatively low. Now the materials you use are higher quality than most so it probably warrants a premium. No thermal bridging alone is probably worth a few thousand dollars. I would purchase it at $11,000.
 

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Corkster

New member
I have been considering purchase of either a Camp X or the Scout Olympic. I think targeting a 1500 series pickup at 6.5 bed is best approach. I think the total cost needs to be 10k or less. If pricing on a kit was 12-15k including shipping and adhesives I would value my time To the point where II would buy a no-options Scout Olympic at 20k instead as it comes with tie downs, DOT lights, and mattress, table from the factory and mod from there.
 

Eagle05

Adventurer
Overland Explorer now offers the Camp X as a shell and they sell the components too including a Truma. The website doesn´t show any prices.
I think I saw an Instagram post that said the base shell would be around $16,000.
 

Eagle05

Adventurer
  1. Size: I like the idea of keeping the tailgate. To me, it would be a reason I would choose this model versus another. Favors security, ease of use with a platform and the backup camera, and I don't have to store a tailgate somewhere.
  2. Cab over bed: I think the suggested size is fine. We sleep on a full size at home or on the road by choice.
  3. Width: Matching the truck width would be my preference and is why I would pick a Scout Yoho over the Olympic even if I had to put a platform to lift it up.
  4. Interior height: The height seems good to me as it's similar to our old Sprinter van and would feel familiar.
  5. Weight: Power Wagon friendly, please. So full-size, but as light as possible.
  6. Extra Credit: Pass through hatch or window options.
  7. Price: Depending on options, I think anything below $15,000 would be good.
 

GeorgeHayduke

New member
I'd be super excited for this to hit the market. I've been eyeing the Scout Olympic but waiting to see what their Kenai model looks like. If you came in at $10-12k I would be motivated to try my own build out and trade some time for money vs buying the Scout at $20k or building out a FWC shell at $13k.
  1. Size: Offer two lengths, one that fits within a fullsize short bed (make sure it fits Ram's 6'4" bed) and one that fits within 8' beds. Offer an optional wraparound storage box so the 8' length can go on a shortbed truck and make use of the extra space. Would need to include brake lights for the larger wraparound option.
  2. Cab over bed: 48" minimum, 54" would be better (same width as a full mattress). Pullout appeals to many but not hugely important to me.
  3. Width: 7' wide exterior should give enough room for people to sleep east-west in the cabover.
  4. Interior height: 78" is reasonable but I wouldn't go any higher. I'm short, and would prefer as much overhead clearance as possible. I'm more likely to mount skis/kayaks/boxes on top of a hardside than a popup which just makes overhead clearance more in demand.
  5. Vehicle: Full size to start with, then flatbed and compact truck options.
Some other thoughts:
-Options for two roof hatches for fans, one in cabover and one in kitchen area.
-Would be awesome if you provided reinforcements in standard locations to mount cabinets or e-track on the interior and hang boxes, tables, maxtrax on the outside (especially the back)
-Happijac/torquelift tiedowns, or turnbuckles and eyebolts in the bed? Scout has a nice in-bed solution that doesn't require holes in the camper wall.
-An area inside that can get wet and drain would be great for shower, skis, wet gear, grey water etc.
-Will you need a fire egress window?
-An option for mounting propane tanks with lines serving the interior and exterior would be handy.
-Lighting options, both DOT/brake lights, backup flood lights, around camp lights, and interior lights would all be handy, but not sure what you're thinking for wiring?
-If you could offer a couple standard bezels/hatch covers so that we can cut holes as needed for venting/plumbing/etc that'd be handy.
-Options for heating. The whole point of getting a composite hardwall camper for me would be winter trips so heating is important. I hate the standard RV forced air furnace so compatibility with Truma or the Dickinson Newport furnace that Scout is offering would be killer.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
I'd be super excited for this to hit the market. I've been eyeing the Scout Olympic but waiting to see what their Kenai model looks like. If you came in at $10-12k I would be motivated to try my own build out and trade some time for money vs buying the Scout at $20k or building out a FWC shell at $13k.
  1. Size: Offer two lengths, one that fits within a fullsize short bed (make sure it fits Ram's 6'4" bed) and one that fits within 8' beds. Offer an optional wraparound storage box so the 8' length can go on a shortbed truck and make use of the extra space. Would need to include brake lights for the larger wraparound option.
  2. Cab over bed: 48" minimum, 54" would be better (same width as a full mattress). Pullout appeals to many but not hugely important to me.
  3. Width: 7' wide exterior should give enough room for people to sleep east-west in the cabover.
  4. Interior height: 78" is reasonable but I wouldn't go any higher. I'm short, and would prefer as much overhead clearance as possible. I'm more likely to mount skis/kayaks/boxes on top of a hardside than a popup which just makes overhead clearance more in demand.
  5. Vehicle: Full size to start with, then flatbed and compact truck options.
Some other thoughts:
-Options for two roof hatches for fans, one in cabover and one in kitchen area.
-Would be awesome if you provided reinforcements in standard locations to mount cabinets or e-track on the interior and hang boxes, tables, maxtrax on the outside (especially the back)
-Happijac/torquelift tiedowns, or turnbuckles and eyebolts in the bed? Scout has a nice in-bed solution that doesn't require holes in the camper wall.
-An area inside that can get wet and drain would be great for shower, skis, wet gear, grey water etc.
-Will you need a fire egress window?
-An option for mounting propane tanks with lines serving the interior and exterior would be handy.
-Lighting options, both DOT/brake lights, backup flood lights, around camp lights, and interior lights would all be handy, but not sure what you're thinking for wiring?
-If you could offer a couple standard bezels/hatch covers so that we can cut holes as needed for venting/plumbing/etc that'd be handy.
-Options for heating. The whole point of getting a composite hardwall camper for me would be winter trips so heating is important. I hate the standard RV forced air furnace so compatibility with Truma or the Dickinson Newport furnace that Scout is offering would be killer.
Great reply thanks!
Quick note on the heating: We would never offer an open flame heating solution. The risk of suffocating is simply too high! Instead we are offering the planar diesel furnace: https://expeditionupfitter.com/collections/heat-hot-water/products/planar-diesel-air-heater-2d-12-high-altitude-w-truck-install-kit. These units are pretty much bomb proof and very easy to install.
Lighting: We have and will offer the kits with DOT approved LED marker lights. The roof has wire chases as a standard feature but you need to do the hook up/install yourself. Same goes for the roof vents.
The camper will be sold with stainless steel corners on the outside that will also act as tie down points. For weight saving we will not include internal wall structure to mount tires and such. We are doing this with our big campers already... Sadly, with those smaller trucks there will be some compromises...
Wet room: The camper body itself should be 100% water tight after the assembly. All you need is to install a drain wherever you need it.

Cheers,
 

Canlib

New member
While I'm not looking for a high top camper for a full size pickup I hope along with the corner extrusions you might consider a diy panel package. I want a pop up hard side camper for my Colorado that I can take on short fishing trips in the bush. You should have a serious look at Andrew's camper design at 1986 GMC S-15 on this forum. Something like that in a slide in that does not require removing the tailgate and backup camera is what I will build. I'd prefer to do it out of composite instead of welding aluminum if I could find a panel supplier.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
While I'm not looking for a high top camper for a full size pickup I hope along with the corner extrusions you might consider a diy panel package. I want a pop up hard side camper for my Colorado that I can take on short fishing trips in the bush. You should have a serious look at Andrew's camper design at 1986 GMC S-15 on this forum. Something like that in a slide in that does not require removing the tailgate and backup camera is what I will build. I'd prefer to do it out of composite instead of welding aluminum if I could find a panel supplier.
It's 100% confirmed that we will not be offering the extrusions/hardware for a pop up. At least not yet... What I can confirm: We will only sell the campers as a kit, we will also make our 2" FRP corner extrusions available if you like to make your own panels!

Cheers,
 
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