Sleep Well On Your Next Adventure: Sea To Summit Sleep System

Exploring Elements

Supporting Sponsor
I’ve now spent over 120 nights, in a WIDE range of conditions over the past 20 months, sleeping in this Sea To Summit sleep system; Talus Ts II Bag, Comfort Plus Insulated Mat, Aeros Pillow and Thermolite Reactor Extreme Liner. I’m going to cut right to the chase with this review, great versatile system that will keep you warm and comfortable wherever your sleeping arrangements might find you. Read on for all the details.

Full Review here: http://www.exploringelements.com/sleep-anywhere-sea-to-summit-sleep-system/

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Kerensky97

Xterra101
I'm amazed at how compact and light gear has gotten in the last couple decades.
I haven't been backpacking in about 15 years but all my bulky stuff (that was good gear) from back then looks archaic compared to what people are using today.
 

whitenoise

Adventurer
These "sleep systems" would be great if they had the option to neatly pack and unpack everything as one unit, rather than having to stuff bag, pad and pillow separately. With vehicle-dependent camping you dont need to do this most times! I once timed myself doing this and spent more time (about 25 mins for 3 sets) than erecting/packing away the 3-person tent itself....
 

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Exploring Elements

Supporting Sponsor
These "sleep systems" would be great if they had the option to neatly pack and unpack everything as one unit, rather than having to stuff bag, pad and pillow separately. With vehicle-dependent camping you dont need to do this most times! I once timed myself doing this and spent more time (about 25 mins for 3 sets) than erecting/packing away the 3-person tent itself....
I fully understand, but when traveling on a moto, kayak, backpack, luggage, etc... it is important for the overall system to not pack up too large. It is REALLY easy and quick to leave all of this system together and roll it up as one and put it in the mesh bag the sleeping bag comes in, which works perfect for 4x4 travel.

Even better for full time 4x4 travel, like I do most of the time, is a sleep system like the RV Superbag, which I reviewed here: http://www.exploringelements.com/review-rv-superbag/. I use this system most of the time I'm traveling in my home on wheels.
 

Exploring Elements

Supporting Sponsor
Agreed. That's 90% of the reason I moved from a great ground tent (OZ Tent RV4) to a hard-shell RTT. Simple setup is very important.
Fully agree that simple setup when trying to go to sleep is key to happiness on the road. I don't want to waste an hour of my day setting up and breaking down my shelter/sleep system. The bed in the EEXP can be made in under 10 seconds, and that is completely by design.
 

whitenoise

Adventurer
I fully understand, but when traveling on a moto, kayak, backpack, luggage, etc... it is important for the overall system to not pack up too large.
Agreed, which is why I said "option". It would have been really easy for the manufacturer to include features like velcro or zippers or some other fastening method which would make setup/teardown easy . I'm not knocking this particular product at all, but IMO anything that is called a system really needs to be a system, not just individual components of it sold in a single bag. Other examples of this include the Kelty and REI sleep "systems".


Even better for full time 4x4 travel, like I do most of the time, is a sleep system like the RV Superbag, which I reviewed here: http://www.exploringelements.com/review-rv-superbag/. I use this system most of the time I'm traveling in my home on wheels.
Thanks for making me aware of this product. This is great for a camper....not sure how well it would work in a ground tent without a pad. Any idea what the weight is?

Great camper BTW!
 

Exploring Elements

Supporting Sponsor
All of the hardware you describe to make the pieces stay together add weight and bulk, not good things for a lightweight portable system like this. With that said STS does not sell this as a "system," but I have labeled it as such because it works so well together.

The RV Superbag is a great product for camper life. Not sure the weight, but not lightweight at all, or compact. For sure not any good without a pad/mattress. It does work in a tent with a mattress/pad or two under it though, for car camping type adventures.

The EEXP is a great home :)
 

PlacidWaters

Adventurer
This system seems heavy and expensive. The sleeping bag is rated to 14F but you say you have to add a liner in the low 20s. That seems to indicate that the bag rating is off by about 10 degrees. Why you would pay $487 for a sleeping bag + liner weighing 3 lbs 6 oz instead of paying less money for a true 20F bag weighing around 2lbs 8 oz? The LL Bean 20, which I believe is accurately rated for temperature, is $250 less than your sleeping bag plus liner:

https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/77725?feat=506831-GN3&page=l-l-bean-down-sleeping-bag-with-downtek-mummy-20&csp=f&attrValue_0=Apricot Orange/Cool Silver&productId=1287259

Add a 2-person tent to your $775 setup and you're at $1000 or more, which I think is unnecessary. My setup for 20 degrees cost $365 and weighs 5 lbs 3 oz. To wit:
LL Bean down 20F rectangular sleeping bag 2 lbs 15 oz
Exped Synmat 3D 7 mattress 2 lbs 1 oz
Trekology pillow 3 oz

I kayak camp and these items easily fit in the hatches.
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
I've used this combo as well for over a year. From Nepal to Peru it's been stellar. I just used it last weekend on a backpack trip with temps cold enough to freeze my bottles.

The Talus TsII is 2 pounds, 5 ounces and pretty toasty. Bag ratings are always subjective and influenced by a variety of variables mostly the sleep warmth of the individual within. I sleep cold, but I was quite warm in the TsII down to temps in the mid 20s. That's pretty typical for any bag rated to 14 or in that range. Anytime you arrive at a bag's listed rating, you're going to be cold.

One thing Bryon didn't mention is the quality of an STS bag. You do pay for the quality, which I think is well worth the investment. Every single bag they sell comes with a signed certificate listing the test results of the down fill for that particular bag. Each bag also includes a very high quality compression sack, super nice storage sack, and cotton wash bag. It's also worth pointing out the shell fabric and little details like the heavily calendared zipper guard add to the price, but certainly to the user experience. If those things are not worth extra money to you, that's understandable, but they do justify the price.
 

PlacidWaters

Adventurer
It's a given that individual response to cold affects your experience with a sleeping bag. But some companies have developed a reputation among users for either reliable or unreliable temperature claims. Big Agnes users often comment on the exaggerated temperature ratings, and that was my experience also and a reason I no long use a BA sleeping bag. After owning three LL Bean bags I have faith in their temperature ratings.
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
It's a given that individual response to cold affects your experience with a sleeping bag. But some companies have developed a reputation among users for either reliable or unreliable temperature claims. Big Agnes users often comment on the exaggerated temperature ratings, and that was my experience also and a reason I no long use a BA sleeping bag. After owning three LL Bean bags I have faith in their temperature ratings.
Most of the larger bag purveyors will have their bags tested in Manhattan, KS at the one commonly used cold chamber with the most frequently used thermal mannequin. I think Therm-a-rest is the only company with their own cold plate large enough for bag testing. I've been there and it's pretty interesting. So, I tend to think bag ratings are more constant than not from brand to brand.

BTW, many people grip about Big Agnes ratings because they spring for a good bag then cheap out on the non-insulated pads and freeze. Having worked for a BA dealer for a while I saw that frequently.
 
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