Single burner propane with VERY low simmer setting?

Freebird

Adventurer
Which single burner stoves can be throttled way back to save gas, and not burn food, on a low simmer?
I know a diffuser can be placed in between, but that seems like a big waste of propane....
Seems all of them (brands) are proud of how many max BTUs can be pumped out.

How well does Partner stoves do at this?
 

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GHI

Adventurer
My Partner Steel 22 inch (2 burner) simmers just fine although I have heard rumblings to the contrary.
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
After burning way too may plates of scrambled eggs (the wife likes 'em soft), I finally switched to a butane "catering" burner:



This particular model includes an adapter so you can also run it on propane, if you really prefer. However the canister-style butane cartridges are easy to pack, last a good long time, and are fairly easy to find. (I get a 4-pack for ~$10 at my local Smart-n-Final/restaurant supply places)

For VERY low flames + outdoor usage, you'll want to hit up your local asian market for one of the accordion-fold wind screens to go with it:


I think I paid $5 for my windscreen. I glued a couple of small magnets to mine too so I can "snap" it right onto the stove.
 

Roger M.

Adventurer
As the owner of a Partner 22", I'd have to say that a low-simmer isn't one of its strong suits.

For a low simmer on one burner, I put a Lodge frying pan on first, and then the pot to be "simmered" goes into the frying pan. It acts as a diffuser without having to carry around a diffuser.
For a low simmer using both burners, I put down my Lodge griddle, which basically covers the entire Partner cook-top.

Takes a bit of time to heat the "diffusers" up, but once heated up they allow for a perfect slow simmer.

But without the "diffusers", I find the Partner just can't be set to a low enough heat without eventually bringing whatever's in the pot to an actual boil.
 

downhill

Adventurer
After burning way too may plates of scrambled eggs (the wife likes 'em soft), I finally switched to a butane "catering" burner:



This particular model includes an adapter so you can also run it on propane, if you really prefer. However the canister-style butane cartridges are easy to pack, last a good long time, and are fairly easy to find. (I get a 4-pack for ~$10 at my local Smart-n-Final/restaurant supply places)

For VERY low flames + outdoor usage, you'll want to hit up your local asian market for one of the accordion-fold wind screens to go with it:


I think I paid $5 for my windscreen. I glued a couple of small magnets to mine too so I can "snap" it right onto the stove.
This!

My stove of choice for the last 8 years. Ditto on the windscreen. they don't like high winds. They come in many versions, and I kind of got obsessed with them at one point. I think I bought 4 or 5, but the best IMO is the Gas One. I use their fuel too. This stove has better heat control than most home gas stoves. You can find their stuff on Amazon, but here is a link to their products: https://gasone.com/collections/portable-stoves
 

dman93

Adventurer
This!

My stove of choice for the last 8 years. Ditto on the windscreen. they don't like high winds. They come in many versions, and I kind of got obsessed with them at one point. I think I bought 4 or 5, but the best IMO is the Gas One. I use their fuel too. This stove has better heat control than most home gas stoves. You can find their stuff on Amazon, but here is a link to their products: https://gasone.com/collections/portable-stoves
So our propane stove regulator failed in Baja and I couldn't find a replacement part nor even a new propane stove, so I bought one of these single burner butane jobs. It worked great when out of the wind, so I bought a folding windscreen and some spare gas bottles and took it to Death Valley last week. Epic fail! At low temps the partially full gas cans lost pressure and the flame was minimal and often went out. I had to keep putting in new cans just to boil a quart of water a few times. And it wasn't that cold ... close to freezing, but still above. I'm sure I can keep the gas cans in my sleeping bag to stay warm overnight, but is there a particular brand of fuel, available in the US, that is blended for better low temp performance, like some brands of the small backpacking canisters? Or am I going to have to get a new propane stove for colder weather? Otherwise I love the size, stability and ignition lighting.
 

dman93

Adventurer
As the owner of a Partner 22", I'd have to say that a low-simmer isn't one of its strong suits.

For a low simmer on one burner, I put a Lodge frying pan on first, and then the pot to be "simmered" goes into the frying pan. It acts as a diffuser without having to carry around a diffuser.
For a low simmer using both burners, I put down my Lodge griddle, which basically covers the entire Partner cook-top.

Takes a bit of time to heat the "diffusers" up, but once heated up they allow for a perfect slow simmer.
Brilliant!
 

downhill

Adventurer
The dual fuel stoves offer the choice of butane or propane. The butane is very convenient. The propane offers better low temp performance and is a bit easier to find. Your choice.
 

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Model97

Member
After burning way too may plates of scrambled eggs (the wife likes 'em soft), I finally switched to a butane "catering" burner:


Very cheap, very small, very controllable. I love these things.



This particular model includes an adapter so you can also run it on propane, if you really prefer. However the canister-style butane cartridges are easy to pack, last a good long time, and are fairly easy to find. (I get a 4-pack for ~$10 at my local Smart-n-Final/restaurant supply places)

For VERY low flames + outdoor usage, you'll want to hit up your local asian market for one of the accordion-fold wind screens to go with it:





I think I paid $5 for my windscreen. I glued a couple of small magnets to mine too so I can "snap" it right onto the stove.
 
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