Should you still buy a Fuso in North America?

Should you still buy a Fuso in North America?


  • Total voters
    12

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
I personally own a 2007 Mitsubishi Fuso 4x4 that I intend to drive for many more years to come. It has a pre-emissions motor (no DEF, etc), manual transmission, solid axles, and a high-low transfer case. I can take it anywhere in the world - and actually get better service for it elsewhere than in the USA. :)

The vehicle I would not own is the 3.0 ULSD with Duonic transmission. This was, IMHO, an abomination that is directly related to Mitsubishi exiting the US truck market.

EarthCruiser is selling their 4x4 converted Fuso with a Chevrolet drivetrain for the time being, and will be selling their 4x4 converted Chevy Low Cab Forward once the current stock of Fusos are exhausted. To me, this is like buying an E-350 converted to 4x4 (I own a UJOR version of this) - a great and capable choice, you just have to suck up the cost of the conversion. If you go to a dealer for service they might scratch their heads a bit at the mods, but they will still take care of you. On the few occasions I have taken my UJOR E-350 to a Ford dealership it was immediately surrounded by dealership employees looking at it and taking pictures, and they always put their best mechanic on it... I would suspect you would experience the same at the Chevy dealer with an EC conversion.
 

HSSC

Member
So sad what DEF has done to the US market by tree hugging know it all types. The last ready mix company in Truckee, Cali had two new Mack mixers with DEF systems. They had around 18 trucks in their fleet. The new DEF trucks went down because of the DEF and were lost for weeks. The loss of concrete production was significant, and very damaging to the bottom line.
I like trees too. I'm sure I ruffled someone's feathers.
 

Howard70

Adventurer
...The vehicle I would not own is the 3.0 ULSD with Duonic transmission. This was, IMHO, an abomination that is directly related to Mitsubishi exiting the US truck market...
Just for the record - We’ve owned two North American FG’s with the 3.0 liter ULSD and Duonic transmissions - a 2014 and a 2017. Many, many happy miles and remote campsites with both. The 2014 has moved on to another owner who travels about as much as we did and appears content as well. Yes we’ve had some down time as Fuso sorted warranty issues with emissions systems but neither truck has had transmission issues although other friends have. When I compare the amount of time our trucks spent in shops with the amount time and tows other friends who’s FGs are 2007 and older I honestly don’t see a difference!

So - I’d never tell anyone to buy any year of an FG (or any other vehicle for that matter - those are personal choices as Pugslyyy points out), but I will say that our personal preference of the North American FG’s we personally know would be a 2017 or a 2018. But I’ll happily continue to trundle along with friends who drive other years. At times I’ll envy their two speed transfer cases and other times be glad I’m not working a clutch! There isn’t a perfect base truck out there - at least not one that I know of.

Howard Snell
 

RaderGuy

New member
Is there any difference in improvements over these last few years of NA FG's? Any improvements or changes between the years of 2013-2017/18? Is there a reason lean towards a last year model, such as a 2017 vs say a 2014?
 

Michelle@EarthCruiser

Supporting Sponsor
Fuso, like a lot of other manufacturers had some issues with the introduction of the DEF systems in the earlier models. Although they can (and have ) upgrade the older systems the later year models have few if any issues.
 

Howard70

Adventurer
Is there any difference in improvements over these last few years of NA FG's? Any improvements or changes between the years of 2013-2017/18? Is there a reason lean towards a last year model, such as a 2017 vs say a 2014?
RadarGuy:

There are differences in software for the various control units (emissions, engine, transmission, etc) that noticeably affect performance. There have been transmission, engine, and fuel system upgrades as well. I don't know about 2012s and 2013s, but some 2014s that enjoyed savvy owners and knowledgeable Fuso dealers / service centers may have been brought up to date on many of those changes but I wouldn't assume that was the case. While you might be lucky with a 2012 through 2015 or unlucky with a 2017 or 2018, I would guess that getting the latest model possible would provide the best assurance of a truck that was well sorted out. Also, while the powertrain warranty is an impressive 5 years / 175,000 miles (or something like that) many components you might assume fell within that coverage don't. Thus your definite warranty coverage is the transferable "bumper to bumper" 3 year / 36,000 miles. Parts and official service center work on these trucks is expensive and getting as much of the "sorting out" done under warranty as possible could be worth a great difference in initial price. If you find one that you're interested in, I suggest getting the VIN and calling one of the Fuso dealers known to support the modern FG's (one of my favorites is in Portland, OR). Give them the VIN and ask them if you could pay for a complete printout of all warranty, recall, and other work done on the truck. Offering to pay for their time in doing that could encourage them to dig deeper into the databases than just a casual query. It will take some time that they don't get paid for by Fuso so offering to cover that effort seems like goodwill to me.

These modern, computer controlled diesels have almost no relation to what many of us think of when we remember our dad's diesel truck that could be kept running with bailing wire and starting fluid. If that's what one is looking for, then a 2000 or older would definitely be the best bet!

Howard
 

RaderGuy

New member
Right now the decision is really between a super low miles 2017 with still a year left on the warranty, or a 80k miles 2007 pre DEF FG in a 5 spd. The price difference between the two is about 15k - just unsure if I'm getting into a can of worms with either one. The 2017 being a potential future maintenance headache and costly, and/or the 2007 with issues relating to it being more "worn out". Not knowing enough about each setup, it's making it a harder decision. Especially all the bad rap I've read here about the newer Duonic tranmissions has me a bit concerned.
 

Howard70

Adventurer
If I was in your position. I would seek direct communication with as many actual owners of both 2007 and 2017 trucks as I could find. I’d drive both versions in conditions similar to what I anticipate would be my ultimate use. I’d also look into the degree of computer control and thus “limp mode” potential of both platforms and then I’d go with what I found, through direct experience and research, appeared to suit me best.

This thread, along with all things Internet, is a wonderful source of preliminary information and strong opinions. However, I personally would not make major decisions based solely on those inputs. One thing I will confidently suggest is that whichever you choose you’ll have one of the best driver and passenger views possible as you wander about remote tracks. I also suspect you’ll have many hours of satisfaction that you made the correct choice interspersed with fewer hours of acute frustration when you wish you’d gone the other route. Good luck!

Howard
 

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