Should it stay or should it go?

Should I keep the 4Runner or move on???

  • Keep it, continue building

    Votes: 3 9.4%
  • Keep it for now, stop building and reassess after 2020 MY HD vehicles come out

    Votes: 4 12.5%
  • Trade/Sell for Super Duty

    Votes: 6 18.8%
  • Trade/Sell for Power Wagon

    Votes: 8 25.0%
  • Get bent you ungrateful, impossible to satisfy lunatic

    Votes: 11 34.4%
  • Fingers crossed for a Ford HighBoy (PW competitor)

    Votes: 2 6.3%

  • Total voters
    32
  • Poll closed .

Tex68w

Beach Bum
I have mentioned in a few other threads that I have a love/hate relationship with the 4Runner, it's been a very polarizing vehicle for us. For starters, we are on our third one in four years so we obviously like them but we also can't stand them in the same breath and we keep buying them in an attempt to convince ourselves that we love them more lol. They are about as reliable as any modern car can get, they are affordable, they are the perfect size for most trails, they have great resale value, and the aftermarket support is very healthy. On the other end they are full of plastic that makes them feel rather cheap, the glass and body panels are paper thin, the motor and tranny combo leave a lot to be desired, it lacks most modern tech and safety features, the road noise is very noticeable (loud cabin), it gets tossed around in high winds, it wanders all over the road at highway speeds, the fuel economy is marginal (but acceptable), and everyone and their brother has one. Now some of those complaints are subjective and others are simply a product of a vehicle in its class/size, but they are worth pointing out.

For the two of us it works well around town and on short weekend get aways. However, we have two 100lb dogs which eat up most of the interior even with the seats down, and we spend a lot of time on the highway to and from work and the ranch where its most glaring fault/dislike is illuminated. For solo camping trips it's perfect for myself to camp inside, but add a second person and the interior for sleeping is out of the question without removing everything, including the fridge/freezer. Most items have to go on the roof when traveling further reducing its handling and performance. It won't tow a decent sized boat and I am not willing to dump thousands into a supercharger that has issues of its own and will likely reduce its lifespan and reliability. I love that it will likely run for forever if properly maintained and the aftermarket is here to stay and likely only improve going forward. Looks are subjective but I think it's a timeless design and the soaring sales numbers seem to back that up.

Should we find our way back into a full-size HD truck we open the opportunity of a diesel and its towing capabilities along with the multitude of campers and bed build out options. I hate that I would have to start from scratch and should I not end up back in a PW I will have to likely purchase gears, a front locker, lift, wheels/tires, bumpers, etc. so it won't be a cheap proposition. In an ideal world we'd keep the 4Runner for use around town and solo trips, but that's just not in the cards right now with all of our other irons in the fire. So chime in, let me know what you think we should do or maybe what you would do if you found yourself in a similar position. Thanks!
 

motoboss

Bad Influence
Depends on age (yours) and financial ability.
Is this "the last rig build" you'll do? (Age question)
Can you afford to start from scratch? (Financial question)

My $.02 is sell and get what you want/need to travel as you wish.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
Depends on age (yours) and financial ability.
Is this "the last rig build" you'll do? (Age question)
Can you afford to start from scratch? (Financial question)

My $.02 is sell and get what you want/need to travel as you wish.
Im in my mid thirties and finances are fine at this level, I can't swing a Earth Roamer or Unimog build if that's what you're asking.

Last rig, doubtful, but I'd like to keep one for a while, say four to seven years.

I can afford to start over, its more of a sanity check than anything. I am aware of my constant inability to stay satisfied when it comes to vehicles, it runs in my blood, thanks dad lol.
 

vintageracer

To Infinity and Beyond!
If you sell the 4runner how much money will it sell for?

Is that amount of money that big a deal in your life?

Do you "have to have" that amount of money to add to your kitty to afford the purchase of the "new to you" trail vehicle?

IF the answer is YES to the last 2 questions than maybe you should reconsider the purchase of a new trail rig.

IF the answer is NO then keep the 4runner and move forward with the purchase of another vehicle you THINK might match your current wants and needs!

Given the fact that the 4runner is a new one and worth a LOT OF MONEY my suggestions might not work.

Oh well I tried!

Ridgeline it is!!!
 

Dalko43

Explorer
2x 100lb dogs seals the deal for me: get another vehicle.

I have only 1x 100lb dog (albeit one that sheds a lot) and I usually travel solo...the 4runnner is adequate in terms of space, but I've pretty much destroyed my rear storage area (or rather my dog has) since any kind of outdoor activities (hunting, camping, tracking) usually involves bringing a lot of mud, dirt and hair into the vehicle.

For 2-3 people who don't hunt or don't have big dogs, the 4runner is perfect. If you go over 3 people or start dealing with bigger (or multiple dogs) the 4runner just doesn't have enough space.

Replacement options are subjective. I don't know how often you tow campers or go on long distance road trips. Nor do I know how the fuel is priced in your area. If diesel is cheap (at least relatively so) and you see yourself doing lots of long distances cruises, especially with a tow or heavy payload, then I see the merits of diesel. If you're going to use your vehicle 95% for daily commutes and only do an occasional trip, I think diesel makes less sense. But again that's subjective. If you want the simplicity and reliability of the 4runner but with a little bit more space and creature comforts, I'd look at a Tundra. MPG's won't be great (though not as bad as some people make them out to be), but you'll have a 38 gallon tank with plenty of space in the back for dogs, gear and extra fuel. If you want a bit more fuel economy and still decent space, look at the Tacoma w/ manual transmission (lower gearing and driver controls the transmission shifting).

Obviously there are domestic options in the midsized and 1/2 ton segments....I still think Toyota makes the most durable vehicles in those segments.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
If you sell the 4runner how much money will it sell for?

Trade is $40K according to book and recent offers from dealers, as it sits I think I could get $42K outright without much issue.

Is that amount of money that big a deal in your life?

Yes and no, I like to roll things over towards the next venture but at the end of the day we have no kids (low overhead) and we can always make more money.

Do you "have to have" that amount of money to add to your kitty to afford the purchase of the "new to you" trail vehicle?

Again, yes and no, it would be nice to have the tax shelter and/or eliminate one payment in favor of another instead of adding more.

IF the answer is YES to the last 2 questions than maybe you should reconsider the purchase of a new trail rig.

Agreed, that's why I made this very post. It's nice to hear others thoughts on the matter, some might see something I don't and I always enjoy another perspective when it comes to wants vs. needs and financial decisions.

IF the answer is NO then keep the 4runner and move forward with the purchase of another vehicle you THINK might match your current wants and needs!

Again, as much as I'd like to do this I can't justify it, too many other irons in the fire to justify a third new vehicle at the moment.

Given the fact that the 4runner is a new one and worth a LOT OF MONEY my suggestions might not work.

Oh well I tried!

I appreciate the input.

Ridgeline it is!!!

Haha, I'd build a new Rav4 before I ever purchase a Ridgeline lol.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
2x 100lb dogs seals the deal for me: get another vehicle.

I have only 1x 100lb dog (albeit one that sheds a lot) and I usually travel solo...the 4runnner is adequate in terms of space, but I've pretty much destroyed my rear storage area (or rather my dog has) since any kind of outdoor activities (hunting, camping, tracking) usually involves bringing a lot of mud, dirt and hair into the vehicle.

For 2-3 people who don't hunt or don't have big dogs, the 4runner is perfect. If you go over 3 people or start dealing with bigger (or multiple dogs) the 4runner just doesn't have enough space.

Replacement options are subjective. I don't know how often you tow campers or go on long distance road trips. Nor do I know how the fuel is priced in your area. If diesel is cheap (at least relatively so) and you see yourself doing lots of long distances cruises, especially with a tow or heavy payload, then I see the merits of diesel. If you're going to use your vehicle 95% for daily commutes and only do an occasional trip, I think diesel makes less sense. But again that's subjective. If you want the simplicity and reliability of the 4runner but with a little bit more space and creature comforts, I'd look at a Tundra. MPG's won't be great (though not as bad as some people make them out to be), but you'll have a 38 gallon tank with plenty of space in the back for dogs, gear and extra fuel. If you want a bit more fuel economy and still decent space, look at the Tacoma w/ manual transmission (lower gearing and driver controls the transmission shifting).

Obviously there are domestic options in the midsized and 1/2 ton segments....I still think Toyota makes the most durable vehicles in those segments.

It is indeed tight inside when the two of us and the dogs go away for the weekend. One of the biggest drawbacks to any SUV versus a truck is the fact that you must bring the wet, muddy, stinky inside the vehicle with you where you can keep them outside with a truck. Payload is a factor as well and it was surprising just how little added weight made the rear of the 4Runner squat on my last trip. We had two guys, a weekends worth of food/drink, a fridge/freezer, two 1650 Pelican cases (most of this gear was in these cases), recovery gear, and our camp setups along with 4gal of fuel and water and we were overloaded with a reverse rake with that static load. This would obviously have to be addressed should I keep the 4Runner.

In regards to the truck and diesel vs. gas well you're right, it's subjective. For the most part a gasser will more than do, but we do have the occasional heavy pull 12K+ from time to time. This may change in one direction or another in time so who knows, but I tend to be over prepared instead of under gunned and hoping for the best, this lends itself to favoring a diesel. The Power Wagon however, was an eye opener for us, it tackled everything we threw at it with ease and proved that a gasser HD can get it done and on cheaper fuel and with cheaper maintenance costs. Gas has shot up recently and regular unleaded is floating around $2.40/gal and diesel is now only $0.10-0.20 cents more so the gas/diesel delta that existed six months ago is no longer valid, this of course changes with the winds so I don't place much value in that area.

I like the Tundra, it's a great truck but I don't think I would buy one the year before the much overdue redesign is set to hit. They have a great aftermarket and of course all of the the Toyota reliability perks apply as well. In the end I would likely stick with a 3/4-ton/HD truck over a midsize or half-ton.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
It is indeed tight inside when the two of us and the dogs go away for the weekend. One of the biggest drawbacks to any SUV versus a truck is the fact that you must bring the wet, muddy, stinky inside the vehicle with you where you can keep them outside with a truck. Payload is a factor as well and it was surprising just how little added weight made the rear of the 4Runner squat on my last trip. We had two guys, a weekends worth of food/drink, a fridge/freezer, two 1650 Pelican cases (most of this gear was in these cases), recovery gear, and our camp setups along with 4gal of fuel and water and we were overloaded with a reverse rake with that static load. This would obviously have to be addressed should I keep the 4Runner.

In regards to the truck and diesel vs. gas well you're right, it's subjective. For the most part a gasser will more than do, but we do have the occasional heavy pull 12K+ from time to time. This may change in one direction or another in time so who knows, but I tend to be over prepared instead of under gunned and hoping for the best, this lends itself to favoring a diesel. The Power Wagon however, was an eye opener for us, it tackled everything we threw at it with ease and proved that a gasser HD can get it done and on cheaper fuel and with cheaper maintenance costs. Gas has shot up recently and regular unleaded is floating around $2.40/gal and diesel is now only $0.10-0.20 cents more so the gas/diesel delta that existed six months ago is no longer valid, this of course changes with the winds so I don't place much value in that area.

I like the Tundra, it's a great truck but I don't think I would buy one the year before the much overdue redesign is set to hit. They have a great aftermarket and of course all of the the Toyota reliability perks apply as well. In the end I would likely stick with a 3/4-ton/HD truck over a midsize or half-ton.

The PW is capable, no one will argue otherwise. It's a hog on fuel though, especially when it is put to work. If you're already somewhat underwhelmed by the 4runner's fuel efficiency, I don't see you being happy with the PW's. I really encourage you to go read some of the magazine reviews and fuelly results...they about match up with what I've experienced and they're not too impressive. If you can live with that subpar fuel economy, the PW is indeed the best bang for your buck in terms of offroad capability.

The Tundra would be a good vehicle to pick up used. You can easily find Limited's for ~$32k, SR5's for less. If you're put off by the platform's age and upcoming generation refresh, then I don't see why you'd consider a PW or Ram 2500 given that its in the same scenario.
 
Top