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Sewing Thread....A discussion on making your own adventure textile gear.

rayra

Expedition Leader
yep, Sailrite vids are very helpful, akin to 1A Auto Part's vehicle repair vids

When I can finally lay hands on a sturdy machine, I have a hobie cat -style fabric vehicle roof shade / deck I need to sew using 1000D cordura and 1" webbing for edge reinforcement.

I've also long been looking at the Harbor Freight folding 4'x8' trailer for several uses, they're made to fold up and move around on their own integral casters, like a folding ping pong table. I'd keep it on the side of the house under a garage roof overhang and want to make a weather-resistent fitted cover for it.

I also need to sew up a fitted cab / windshield cover for my old pickup and a couple fitted tire covers. Thing just sits in my driveway 360 days a year.
 

GregSplett

Adventurer
My old singer Has the original work station and motor from like 1920?I forget. My owners manual is actually a Juki manual from their clone, given to me by the shop that tuned it up for me. My machine, unfortunately, is caught up in the lost years of Singer documentation. I am very lucky to have an upholstery supply store nearby that is super knowledgable and friendly. Anyways it has no speed controller just a peddle operated dry clutch. You have to feather the clutch to have any resemblance of speed control. Add to that it has no reverse. Add to that this thing is geared pretty fast and the walking foot is capable of 3/8" No "speed is not your friend".LOL
All great points. Also, having a machine that you can control the speed of the motor so that you can constantly control the fabric and feed rate helps. Speed isn't always your friend.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
My old singer Has the original work station and motor from like 1920?I forget. My owners manual is actually a Juki manual from their clone, given to me by the shop that tuned it up for me. My machine, unfortunately, is caught up in the lost years of Singer documentation. I am very lucky to have an upholstery supply store nearby that is super knowledgable and friendly. Anyways it has no speed controller just a peddle operated dry clutch. You have to feather the clutch to have any resemblance of speed control. Add to that it has no reverse. Add to that this thing is geared pretty fast and the walking foot is capable of 3/8" No "speed is not your friend".LOL
I can relate, my REX that I just retired had the massive Clutch Motor. It was a perfectly fine system for years. For around $100 you can replace the clutch motor with a viable speed servo motor. The great thing is a servo motor infinitely more controllable (speed) and isn't constantly running (saves electricity) and it's quieter and less fatiguing. No Reverse would be a challenge. Good luck.
 

Driftwood77

New member
Sailmaker here. Also make boat covers, mend horse rugs and do leather work.
I have a Durcopp and a Singer industrial machines and a Jones and Singer domestic machines.
I think you will find that seam tape will not stick to Ultrasil or any coated material like that.
 

GregSplett

Adventurer
I can relate, my REX that I just retired had the massive Clutch Motor. It was a perfectly fine system for years. For around $100 you can replace the clutch motor with a viable speed servo motor. The great thing is a servo motor infinitely more controllable (speed) and isn't constantly running (saves electricity) and it's quieter and less fatiguing. No Reverse would be a challenge. Good luck.
I looked into a speed controller but I decided to just make do.No reverse means I have to stop with the needle down in the work and spin the work around on the table to lock stitch. IIs what it is. The singer probably comes out twice a year realistically.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
Could any of you old hands / pros direct me to a machine or source where I can get a machine capable of sewing 2-3 layers of 1000D, but costs roughly ~$300. I really can't afford $800 for a machine I might use once a year. I have no qualms about buying used / refurbished or 'used but taken decent care of'.
I'm on the edge of L.A. and even considering our 'garment district' the only thing I find is parted out industrial machines or ones that are no doubt clapped out, otherwise they're scooped up right away down there.
I've got too many hobbies as it is already to make finding a suitable machine yet another Quest / field of study. But I could sure use one. Even thinking about hiring the work out to some local sewing bee / knitting circle. I've got a lot of other skillsets, could probably even do some barter that direction. matter of fact that's probably a good idea.
 
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The Artisan

Adventurer
Could any of you old hands / pros direct me to a machine or source where I can get a machine capable of sewing 2-3 layers of 1000D, but costs roughly ~$300. I really can't afford $800 for a machine I might use once a year. I have no qualms about buying used / refurbished or 'used but taken decent care of'.
I'm on the edge of L.A. and even considering our 'garment district' the only thing I find is parted out industrial machines or ones that are no doubt clapped out, otherwise they're scooped up right away down there.
I've got too many hobbies as it is already to make finding a suitable machine yet another Quest / field of study. But I could sure use one. Even thinking about hiring the work out to some local sewing bee / knitting circle. I've got a lot of other skillsets, could probably even do some barter that direction. matter of fact that's probably a good idea.
Look on CL
Kevin
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Could any of you old hands / pros direct me to a machine or source where I can get a machine capable of sewing 2-3 layers of 1000D, but costs roughly ~$300. I really can't afford $800 for a machine I might use once a year. I have no qualms about buying used / refurbished or 'used but taken decent care of'.
I'm on the edge of L.A. and even considering our 'garment district' the only thing I find is parted out industrial machines or ones that are no doubt clapped out, otherwise they're scooped up right away down there.
I've got too many hobbies as it is already to make finding a suitable machine yet another Quest / field of study. But I could sure use one. Even thinking about hiring the work out to some local sewing bee / knitting circle. I've got a lot of other skillsets, could probably even do some barter that direction. matter of fact that's probably a good idea.
For the limited amount of use your looking at really any manufacturer of a walking foot machine should work well. Of course, the quality of the machine will add to price, support, comfort, etc... So, doing CL, pawn shop, used sewing machine stores and garage sale searches for Juki, Pfaffer, Rex, Singer, Kingman, Brother, Toyota, Janome, Sailrite, Consew, etc......most should come with its own sewing table, motor (clutch or servo), lights and accessories (bobbins, bobbin case, needles, etc...). All these machines will easily handle 2-3 layers of 1000d. Even some of the older household general purpose, non walking machines with separate sewing table motors will handle that type of material. Next, make sure you do your homework on each model, since each manufacturer will produce all kinds of machines for specific industries or sewing requirements and change model numbers without any rhyme or reason. You wouldn't want to end up with a Consew high speed garment machine that is too fast and doesn't have enough torque to handle your job.

Be patient, but prepared to purchase since good machines will go fast. Like you said, since you live next to a garment district be careful of worn out machines. Repairs can be expensive if not impossible for wornout industrial machines. Good luck!
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
Could any of you old hands / pros direct me to a machine or source where I can get a machine capable of sewing 2-3 layers of 1000D, but costs roughly ~$300. I really can't afford $800 for a machine I might use once a year. I have no qualms about buying used / refurbished or 'used but taken decent care of'.
I'm on the edge of L.A. and even considering our 'garment district' the only thing I find is parted out industrial machines or ones that are no doubt clapped out, otherwise they're scooped up right away down there.
I've got too many hobbies as it is already to make finding a suitable machine yet another Quest / field of study. But I could sure use one. Even thinking about hiring the work out to some local sewing bee / knitting circle. I've got a lot of other skillsets, could probably even do some barter that direction. matter of fact that's probably a good idea.
I’ve done the hiring out path, and then bought my own. It was difficult for me to communicate my wants with the seamstress ladies. Aside from language, they didn’t understand the structure needed for things like straps. I found a husquavarna / Viking from the 1970s on Craigslist for $80. It has no walking foot but is all mechanical drive, (no electronic logic) weighs about 30 lbs, and seems to punch through 3 layers of denim or multiple web straps with no concerns. I’ve used it close to zero, but when my in-laws visited, my daughter made a couple of dresses with grandma, and grandma was impressed by it.

Best part, the case smells like old leather. It literally smells like the 1973 Jaguar I used to have!
 

Lucky j

Explorer
To my knowledge and practice, and still learning, a old style standard sewing machine will do 3 layers of 1000D cordura type of material. That is if I got your material right.
 

GregSplett

Adventurer
I’ve done the hiring out path, and then bought my own. It was difficult for me to communicate my wants with the seamstress ladies. Aside from language, they didn’t understand the structure needed for things like straps. I found a husquavarna / Viking from the 1970s on Craigslist for $80. It has no walking foot but is all mechanical drive, (no electronic logic) weighs about 30 lbs, and seems to punch through 3 layers of denim or multiple web straps with no concerns. I’ve used it close to zero, but when my in-laws visited, my daughter made a couple of dresses with grandma, and grandma was impressed by it.

Best part, the case smells like old leather. It literally smells like the 1973 Jaguar I used to have!
Even more important than the lack of electronics or a confuser is that it has all steel drive gears. The newer plastic geared machines are weak and finicky because of it. My wife has a newer Husk Viking machine that is a plastic piece of bleep. I have had to help her take it down to the shop, that ripped her off, to be tuned up three times in two years. The tune-ups are not free.I hate that machine as much as the snotty women down at the sewing shop hate me. I have an old steel geared Brothers machine that she has taken to borrowing because she is afraid of goofing up the 1500 dollar piece of bleep.
 

Gascan4X4

Low Speed, High Drag
I understand that this thread is mainly about making textile gear but, having read a few posts about sewing machines in here, would any of you kinds sirs please post pointers on what to check/look/test for when buying a used industrial sewing machine... It seams (pun intended) my 7th grade Home Ec class didn't cover that.
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
I understand that this thread is mainly about making textile gear but, having read a few posts about sewing machines in here, would any of you kinds sirs please post pointers on what to check/look/test for when buying a used industrial sewing machine... It seams (pun intended) my 7th grade Home Ec class didn't cover that.
Another failing in our education system... why is it that I remember the names of gymnastics positions from PE, yet was never taught how to identify a good used industrial sewing machine?!?!? I blame public schools! 🤔😂

Seriously though, that would be nice to hear about. Maybe some tips on value too?
 

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
I really want a heavy-duty sewing machine with a deep throat. Have for decades....but still haven't actually purchased one.

I deal with a local boot-maker (cobbler?). He has always helped me out, and he is cheap. Unfortunately he is also busy, so the wait time is something that I need to calculate when we do business.

If a fellow wanted to buy his first sewing machine and learn the basics of sewing....where would he start? I was a cabinet maker in the years past, and "parts is parts". :) I'm confident that I can do the sewing, but I don't know where to start.
 

krick3tt

Adventurer
Years ago when I was suddenly on my own the two things I bought were a wok (to learn to cook) and a sewing machine (to learn to make my own stuff and hem pants and such) I still have them both 40 years later. Take a sewing class, they are out there, just to learn the basics. It can change your life.
 
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