Sewing Thread....A discussion on making your own adventure textile gear.

Paddler Ed

Adventurer
All the ideas here have got me thinking.... wife wants a new sewing machine for quilting (her AU$100 one that she got 8 years ago is playing up a bit....) so we've been looking around at what's on offer.

The good news is she is recpetive to getting something a bit heavier duty (not full on canvas work, I go to the local saddlery for that, and vehicle upholstry I have a guy for as well) that can handle light canvas work, and a bit of synthetic tarp work. I've read with interset other's experience with SilPoly/PolySil (like the Xenon Sil 1.1 for example) etc, and that's interesting as that's things that we're looking at making things from.

In terms of what we've found, bit of a mixed bag and mainly "lighter" duty machines, so I'd like to ask your thoughts:

The 4452 looks appealing as it has a walking foot option, whilst the Toyota has a list of thicknesses of materials it'll run with.... any suggestions please?! (Even if you're asking the impossible....)
 

Iain_U1250

Explorer
All the ideas here have got me thinking.... wife wants a new sewing machine for quilting (her AU$100 one that she got 8 years ago is playing up a bit....) so we've been looking around at what's on offer.

The good news is she is recpetive to getting something a bit heavier duty (not full on canvas work, I go to the local saddlery for that, and vehicle upholstry I have a guy for as well) that can handle light canvas work, and a bit of synthetic tarp work. I've read with interset other's experience with SilPoly/PolySil (like the Xenon Sil 1.1 for example) etc, and that's interesting as that's things that we're looking at making things from.

In terms of what we've found, bit of a mixed bag and mainly "lighter" duty machines, so I'd like to ask your thoughts:

The 4452 looks appealing as it has a walking foot option, whilst the Toyota has a list of thicknesses of materials it'll run with.... any suggestions please?! (Even if you're asking the impossible....)
The Singer is a tough machine, it did all the long seams in our awning, three layers of our heavy duty canvas (500gsm). My wife used the walking foot attachment, found it to be OK, but not great. They are pretty cheap, come up in Spotlight sales for $400 every few months. It should have no problem with that lightweight canvas.
 
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Iain_U1250

Explorer
Fantastic work! That's a ton of work with large pieces......wow!
Thanks, we transformed out lounge room into a workshop lol. Biggest piece was 6m x 4m, and stitching the front and sailtrack tape on the back meant we had a 6m runs, stitching is not to OEM standards like yours, but we are happy with the result. Looking at some of the professional custom awnings we have seen, our is not to bad at all.

2021-02-24 10.08.43.jpg
 

alexcivick

Observer
I’ve been so busy making bags and stuff for my business so when I finally got some time to work on projects for myself today I decided to make some organization for my Snow Peak Iron Grill Table. Yuman Desert Rat made super nice straps for IGTs and a case for inserts that I really liked so I used his design and made my own. I used some extras and scrap fabric and the only size webbing and hook and loop I have is 1” and I only had today to get done.
It’s mostly adjustable straps made from poly webbing and fastened with hook and loop tape. 2 straps with slots to hold all of the legs tied to the back and 2 adjustable straps that wrap around to secure large table and corner pieces. For the inserts and small accessories I made a fabric pouch bound with webbing that folds over the pieces and secured with hook and loop tape. The pouch gets sandwiched between the frame and tables. Nothing new or innovative it’s just copied from Yuma’s design. This allows all of the pieces for my IGT setup to fit in the Snow Peak carry bag much better.





It was a quick job made from rough measurements and no pattern so it’s a little janky. I also had to use my portable walking foot machine instead of my industrials so I could use a smaller thread size (industrials are tensioned for stitching leather) and I def got used to the conveniences of servo motors, foot/knee lifts, and needle position control.
If I were to do it again I would use wider straps for sure.
While I was at it I starting making some simple Velcro straps for my Pack and Carry Fireplace pieces too. Those are always annoying trying to keep them together.



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BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
OEM: Original Equipment Manufacturer...........

If you've gone through the process of becoming an OEM Manufacturer........you are a god and my hats off to you! Thrilling, challenging, exhausting yet, getting to work with incredible people and materials is awesome. Excited about how this all works out!
Never thought a simple Parts Number label could be so exciting! Made in Colorado, USA in the Rocky Mountains!

70912D1E-A154-4932-B358-3946CA2A215A.jpeg
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
I’ve been so busy making bags and stuff for my business so when I finally got some time to work on projects for myself today I decided to make some organization for my Snow Peak Iron Grill Table. Yuman Desert Rat made super nice straps for IGTs and a case for inserts that I really liked so I used his design and made my own. I used some extras and scrap fabric and the only size webbing and hook and loop I have is 1” and I only had today to get done.
It’s mostly adjustable straps made from poly webbing and fastened with hook and loop tape. 2 straps with slots to hold all of the legs tied to the back and 2 adjustable straps that wrap around to secure large table and corner pieces. For the inserts and small accessories I made a fabric pouch bound with webbing that folds over the pieces and secured with hook and loop tape. The pouch gets sandwiched between the frame and tables. Nothing new or innovative it’s just copied from Yuma’s design. This allows all of the pieces for my IGT setup to fit in the Snow Peak carry bag much better.





It was a quick job made from rough measurements and no pattern so it’s a little janky. I also had to use my portable walking foot machine instead of my industrials so I could use a smaller thread size (industrials are tensioned for stitching leather) and I def got used to the conveniences of servo motors, foot/knee lifts, and needle position control.
If I were to do it again I would use wider straps for sure.
While I was at it I starting making some simple Velcro straps for my Pack and Carry Fireplace pieces too. Those are always annoying trying to keep them together.



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That's some great looking stuff! Well done! I've always liked YDR's stuff aswell!
 

Porkchopexpress

Well-known member
Does anyone have the sailrite leatherwork machine? I want to mostly do upholstery fabric and canvas but hopefully get good enough to sew leather at some point. I am also looking at the sailrite ultrafeed.
 

Iain_U1250

Explorer
The Sailright Ultrafeed is the same Sakura Stitch machine as the Sailright Ultrafeed. We found it great, it could stitch the heavy canvas up to six layers, provided we changed the needles often. We tested it on some thin leather, and it worked, but not saddle type leather, more upholstery leather.

2021-04-01 20.49.12.jpg
 

alexcivick

Observer
Does anyone have the sailrite leatherwork machine? I want to mostly do upholstery fabric and canvas but hopefully get good enough to sew leather at some point. I am also looking at the sailrite ultrafeed.
The Leatherwork machine is just an LS-1 with knurled feet, power wheel with reducer pulley, and compact table. For sewing leather it’s ok…. Thin wallets and such it can manage but it’s not a fun time. It’s still not slow enough or powerful enough to be a true leather machine. Although I will say they just released a compact servo motor the WorkerB that is supposed to be pretty slow and strong.
Canvas and upholstery I think is where they are ideal. I use mine for canvas bags all the time. Up to v92 thread. I have an old Thompson 301 and a clone LSZ-1 with a long bed I love and use daily. My opinion, for a hobby machine they are perfect.
Now, if you want to be happy you will need a servo motor. No question. The electric motor is just brutal. Depends on what you are going to make to decide if you really need a zig zag option. Better to have it than not but it cost more and most canvas, leather applications can use just straight stitch.
If you want an easier time get it with a table and treadle control with servo it makes an easier learning curve and the electric domestic pedals are sooooo frustrating.
Another opinion of mine that some may disagree with, if you are concerned about cost for a new hobby you don’t need to get a full package Sailrite. There are many clones. They all work just fine. You can piece together the parts needed with a clone for less than the cost of a new Sailrite package. You sacrifice the customer support (very valuable) but it can be done. If anyone is interested I have links and ideas just ask me.
NOW. SOMETHING TO CONSIDER. A full packaged LSZ-1 or even a Leatherworker can run around $1500. More to add a table etc. in that price range you can also consider an industrial machine….. maybe that’s too much for an hobby but they have advantages.
They are stronger, come with a table, come with a servo motor, can have a needle position sensor, bigger, and can hold value.
Sailrites hold value as well but more buyers are looking for an industrial for resale than a portable.
You can get a walking foot machine in that package for the same price range. That can work for leather and heavy canvas. More efficiently if you ask me.
There are negatives. It’s a huge machine. Heavy and takes up space and requires assembly sometimes and an some mechanical know how in small part. They are not as versatile. Industrial machines are made for just that. industry. They are essentially 1 task machines and that’s it. You couldn’t tension it up to run a heavy thread for leather and then throw a light thread to sew fabric right after. Something to consider. I have some links and suggestions on industrial machine options as well.
I have a few machines to do different things. An industrial cylinder for heavy leather. An industrial flat bed for lighter leather and heavy canvas. A zig zag portable with servo for canvas and binding and the portable straight stitch for the same.


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Porkchopexpress

Well-known member
The Leatherwork machine is just an LS-1 with knurled feet, power wheel with reducer pulley, and compact table. For sewing leather it’s ok…. Thin wallets and such it can manage but it’s not a fun time. It’s still not slow enough or powerful enough to be a true leather machine. Although I will say they just released a compact servo motor the WorkerB that is supposed to be pretty slow and strong.
Canvas and upholstery I think is where they are ideal. I use mine for canvas bags all the time. Up to v92 thread. I have an old Thompson 301 and a clone LSZ-1 with a long bed I love and use daily. My opinion, for a hobby machine they are perfect.
Now, if you want to be happy you will need a servo motor. No question. The electric motor is just brutal. Depends on what you are going to make to decide if you really need a zig zag option. Better to have it than not but it cost more and most canvas, leather applications can use just straight stitch.
If you want an easier time get it with a table and treadle control with servo it makes an easier learning curve and the electric domestic pedals are sooooo frustrating.
Another opinion of mine that some may disagree with, if you are concerned about cost for a new hobby you don’t need to get a full package Sailrite. There are many clones. They all work just fine. You can piece together the parts needed with a clone for less than the cost of a new Sailrite package. You sacrifice the customer support (very valuable) but it can be done. If anyone is interested I have links and ideas just ask me.
NOW. SOMETHING TO CONSIDER. A full packaged LSZ-1 or even a Leatherworker can run around $1500. More to add a table etc. in that price range you can also consider an industrial machine….. maybe that’s too much for an hobby but they have advantages.
They are stronger, come with a table, come with a servo motor, can have a needle position sensor, bigger, and can hold value.
Sailrites hold value as well but more buyers are looking for an industrial for resale than a portable.
You can get a walking foot machine in that package for the same price range. That can work for leather and heavy canvas. More efficiently if you ask me.
There are negatives. It’s a huge machine. Heavy and takes up space and requires assembly sometimes and an some mechanical know how in small part. They are not as versatile. Industrial machines are made for just that. industry. They are essentially 1 task machines and that’s it. You couldn’t tension it up to run a heavy thread for leather and then throw a light thread to sew fabric right after. Something to consider. I have some links and suggestions on industrial machine options as well.
I have a few machines to do different things. An industrial cylinder for heavy leather. An industrial flat bed for lighter leather and heavy canvas. A zig zag portable with servo for canvas and binding and the portable straight stitch for the same.


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Thank you!
Cost isn't a huge concern but I always try to get good value for my money. I'm not sure about zig zag stitches but would probably pay the difference just in case. I used to work in upholstery shops while in high school and college and would like to start it up again as a hobby but I was never too involved in the sewing. Space is a consideration and I have seen how complicated those industrial machines are to maintain. I'm hoping sailrite is a little more simple.
Sailrite is advertising a powerpack for the ultrafeed on their website for 300. If I got the ultrafeed now and got the powerpack later, do you think that would work decently for leather?

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