RTT to ground tent any regrets or vice versa

DCH109

Adventurer
Well the good news is my decision is not any easier, oh wait is that bad news? Nope the replies have been amazing! thank you.
Slight vehicle change, the FJ60 will be sold. Lots of reasons why, but ultimately the decision was based on my wife and her pure hatred for it. The good news is we will take the cash from the sale any pay off my 07 F150. It has a 2" Fox lift on it (coil spring not spacers) and Icon upper control arms. Even better with modern electronics and the heavy duty package it has with the long range fuel tank, it is a better choice. 4 door lots of extras for comfort.
I will be either putting a rollback cover on it with a custom rack and storage in the bed, or a cap with storage. If i go RTT it will not be as high with the rack since i will have it around the same height as the cab. Otherwise on a Cap, it will be WAY up there and based on the height of this now with the lift and 33"s it will need an extension on the ladder.
I have a feeling the rack will win.
That now mean i have a ton of storage and will build the storage in the bed with full electrical including putting the 2nd battery back there.

Now with the room, i can pick either and be set.
 

TwinStick

Explorer
I got a cap. Someone told me before I ordered it, to consider the one with the extra 5-6" above the cab. For me, I am so glad I did. It makes getting into & out of so much easier @ 54 yrs old, plus I have hauled many things that I simply would have been able to with a cab height unit. I also got the Yakima system on top. It is high. I have a Load Warrior w/extension I use to carry the spare camper tire. It is not bad at all standing on the tailgate with an aluminum step. Can access it easily. It's a PW, so it sits high to begin with. Not sure I would want a RTT up there. We have an 8 person Alaskan geodesic dome tent, for when we don't take the camper.
 

brentbba

Explorer
I've run the entire gambit of what everyone has discussed. Started as a kid sleeping in the back of a VW camper bus to an Apache pop up trailer the family used back in the 60's. As an adult, I started with a simple Eureka 10x10 dome tent with a cot and after a decade of beating it to death with scouts I purchased the Springbar 10x10. I have to state up front that it's just me...the wife DOES NOT camp. I loved the Springbar for it's absolute quality and room. Set up wasn't bad, but pounding in 16 stakes around the perimeter got to be a pain. Add two more if you deployed and staked the awning. Typical finding a flat spot issues. From there purchased a M101CDN trailer and eventually put an Eezi-Awn Globetrotter tent on it. Love the heck out of the Globetrotter. Spacious and comfy. Loved being able to get up and down to the ground still in the tent. Set up/take down was not bad as the height to ground was only 5'. I recently sold the trailer/tent set up because it just got to be a pain worrying about whether the trailer could handle some of the trails. Last straw was down Mengel Pass to Butte Valley in Death Valley. Some great spotting got me thru that, but then the next day on a 25 mile stretch of dirt road, I just couldn't keep up with the other trucks with RTT's. Trailer just slowed me down. I looked to downsize as I'd accumulated to much gear...just because the trailer could store it all! I debated as the OP is on whether to go back to a ground tent or go RTT. I drive a lifted 80 series Landcruiser and hitting middle age at 60 this year so the climbing all around the truck setting up and taking down a RTT was a concern. I knew I'd miss the vestibule of the Globetrotter as standing up to change isn't an option in a RTT!

I looked long and hard at both the Maggiolina and James Baroud as well as contempleting the smaller 7x10 Springbar. Again, very concerned with no stand up room to change or just plain get out of inclement weather and have a place to sit/stand in a RTT (either hard or soft top). The Globetrotter and ground tents offered that comfort. I did consider the Tepui/ARB style RTT as they had an attachable vestibule but many discussions with owners about set up/takedown and the cover dissuaded me from that style. I ultimately chose the JB Evasion. I loved the 360* windows it had to offer as well as the sturdy gas struts. I've only spent three nights so far since purchasing the JB late this summer. I do love the ease of set up and takedown, even up on the Cruiser. It's cake. Sleeping has been awesome and so far don't mind changing up in the tent. I will take great interest in the new awning JB is introducing late this year that has a covering over the door that leads down thru a hole in their awning. That would take set up time like any awning/ground tent, but I'll at least take a look. I do like just driving into a campsite, parking and flipping open four latches to see the tent spring to life. First night in the JB was a late arrival at my destination (2 am due to a commitment the previous night!). Rolled in, parked and was head on pillow in well under 5 minutes. Loved it. Next outing in the desert and absolutely loved the 360* panoramic view from up top. Cool desert night breezes were great too. Time will tell with inclement weather!
 

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Model94

Member
2 cents: I find that I'm downsizing and simplifying camp more and more. If no bugs and no rain: sleep under a good tarp. Look at Cooke Custom Sewing Silynlon tundra tarp options or lean shelters, mainly used by canoests in northern US and Canada. This picture was at Deadhorse State Park near Moab. Why go outside just to go inside? I will admit that i splurged on an Exped Megamat for sleeping. That thing is sick nice.

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With rain potential I use good quality 3 season domes. 4 person if moving often. 6 if i want to pamper myself. Silnylon floorless tipi if I'm in a hurry to get set up and leave (and i even have a small Ti cylinder stove if it's cold). Lean shelter there are a few people. Cotton canvas A-Frame with internal woodstove in winter or late fall. Now there is some comfort for you, under about 15 lbs.

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The aggregate cost of all of these is probably equal to a mid priced RTT I'm guessing. I pick the one or two that i'll most likely need for a given trip. None of them take much room. All go up fast enough. Not locked into a "decision" ... Although I will admit to having an ongoing tent fetish of sorts.
 

jeep-N-montero

Expedition Leader
2 cents: I find that I'm downsizing and simplifying camp more and more. If no bugs and no rain: sleep under a good tarp. Look at Cooke Custom Sewing Silynlon tundra tarp options or lean shelters, mainly used by canoests in northern US and Canada. This picture was at Deadhorse State Park near Moab. Why go outside just to go inside? I will admit that i splurged on an Exped Megamat for sleeping. That thing is sick nice.

View attachment 424005

With rain potential I use good quality 3 season domes. 4 person if moving often. 6 if i want to pamper myself. Silnylon floorless tipi if I'm in a hurry to get set up and leave (and i even have a small Ti cylinder stove if it's cold). Lean shelter there are a few people. Cotton canvas A-Frame with internal woodstove in winter or late fall. Now there is some comfort for you, under about 15 lbs.

View attachment 424006

View attachment 424008

View attachment 424009

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The aggregate cost of all of these is probably equal to a mid priced RTT I'm guessing. I pick the one or two that i'll most likely need for a given trip. None of them take much room. All go up fast enough. Not locked into a "decision" ... Although I will admit to having an ongoing tent fetish of sorts.
We have 19 different tents ranging from a lightweight MSR up to our 10x14 canvas palace, I definitely have a problem....
 

Hobiecat

Observer
I will be either putting a rollback cover on it with a custom rack and storage in the bed, or a cap with storage. If i go RTT it will not be as high with the rack since i will have it around the same height as the cab. Otherwise on a Cap, it will be WAY up there and based on the height of this now with the lift and 33"s it will need an extension on the ladder.
We started with a ground tent and it was great, until we went to a sailing event in Michigan and decided to camp on the beach. It rained hard for two days and we had to bury logs to steak it out.......Wet sand everywhere. Our friends were 100 yards away in their nice warm motor homes and Sprinter Vans.

Finding myself with serious RV envy and no place to park one, I ordered an RTT last year. It was pretty cool for the first couple trips and is very nice IF I know that we’ll be doing a couple of back-to-back weekend trips and don’t have to take it off the truck. We have it mounted 8" over the bed, so it's flush with the cab and minimizes the hit on fuel economy, but loading/unloading is a pain. I regularly find myself needing to haul things that won’t fit under it. I’d probably like it more if I could leave it on all season.

I think we will get a cot tent next....or a sailboat that we can sleep on.
 
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Alfissimo

New member
I have been researching RTT's and although I have never tried one due to expense I prefer ground tents as well. My wife is the problem here. lol. So I thought a RTT might be the solution to her sleep issues on the ground. Now I am thinking of coming up for a sleeping solution for her in the truck. I am glad I came along this thread as I really did not want to spend the money on a RTT. Although those OZ tents look really cool and a whole lot less money than an RTT. I am not one to spend a gagillion bucks on overland gear, I am on a tight budget so RTT's don't make sense.

Does anyone have a pic of the tent in the bag so I can gauge how large it is to store (I'll check site for dimensions too).

Thanks
 

DCH109

Adventurer
I have thought long and hard on this and wavered back and forth several times. I also realized that next year I hit 50. With that the FJ60 is staying (my wife still hates it but want me happy) as oddly enough it is the better of the two vehicles, especially in the back county.
I am still not much closer. One thing is clearer is simplifying my life an needs. hence keeping a old Land Cruiser I can fix with a 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, and a pair of pliers.

I was leaning towards a hard top RTT but after looking at the second post the OZ type tent is alluring. Strapping it to the roof it not an issue and it will leave room for a boat in the future.
 

DCH109

Adventurer
And it is decided.
OZ tent or similar. After thinking about this long and hard, while it is super nice to be able to setup where even and when ever I want. My FJ60 will be my daily driver and I decided I did not want a tent strapped to the roof all of the time.
the OZ or similar tent is perfect as I can store it away when not in use.
 

DCH109

Adventurer
And it is decided.
OZ tent or similar. After thinking about this long and hard, while it is super nice to be able to setup where even and when ever I want. My FJ60 will be my daily driver and I decided I did not want a tent strapped to the roof all of the time.
the OZ or similar tent is perfect as I can store it away when not in use.
So to add to this.
My decision was based on a number of things. Where do I camp, what else will I want to haul and how many kids will be with me.
Ultimately the OZ style tent (still shopping) was the solution. An RV5 as I like room and have 2 growing kids. Putting a cot in the tent or sleeping on a few air mattresses is OK for me.
With that having it on the roof is just fine as I can remove it with ease.

While the RTT is a great idea and I really liked the two I had, ultimately the issue was storage. Right now one could consume the whole roof, but soon (Summer 2019) i plan to buy a canoe so my kids and I can go out on some of the lakes. With a RTT there is no way for me to do this without hauling a trailer, something I am not interested in. I just have no desire to bring a trailer or build one.

One thing I did like about the RTT (especially hard shell) was the ability to put away when wet and everything inside being dry. One thing I did not like was changing in one. While the annex is great, if you are putting this up in the dark, or are dead tired, doubtful you are putting up the annex. I had it on my softshell RTT and due to me moving every night to 2 nights, I ended up never taking it out of it bag. That said, i could have camp setup in 20 minutes (stove, chairs, lantern table and cooking)

When I think about the places I camp and have camped in the past years, I cannot think of one location that I could not have pitched a tent. In the Alta lakes region above Telluride the bear sniffing around my side would have given me a scare. But I learned a long time ago not to have the food or the clothes you cooked in with you in a tent. I once had a grizzly walk between two small 2 person tents in the back country in BC bowing in the sidewalls. That was freaky and the only time I ever thought there was going to be trouble. We knew it was in the area due to prints and took appropriate measures.

So the main reason for the ground tent and not the RTT comes down to carrying a canoe. Crazy but true. With the height of the FJ60 there is no way I would put it on top of a RTT.
 

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jpachard

Adventurer
We started with a CVT to see if we liked the rtt thing and the first night sold the idea. Here on the east coast heavy rain, thunderstorms etc are the norm. The rtt solved the following issues: site selection, skunk encounters, wet, muddy tent storage, time to deploy and pack up, storage volume.

We now have a Baroud space and couldn’t be happier. The minor hassle of climbing up a couple steps is overcome by a quality nights sleep away from the mud, striped “friends”, water, dirt etc.


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