RTT on a trailer...Support?

Rbertalotto

Explorer
How are you supporting the part of the RTT that extends from the trailer. Is the ladder the only thing you are using? Some of these set ups look unstable without some type of support under the extended section....
 

shade

Well-known member
How are you supporting the part of the RTT that extends from the trailer. Is the ladder the only thing you are using? Some of these set ups look unstable without some type of support under the extended section....
The ladder typically functions as the primary support, but there are also sections of webbing the run over the top of the tent, tying the moving side of the tent floor to the overhead struts, and over to the fixed side of the tent floor. That's what prevents the tent from flopping past horizontal while opening it.

To prevent it from ever kicking out, I used to run a short strap between the bottom rung and a wheel. This wasn't usually a concern, but on some surfaces or during high winds, it added some security to the set up.
 

Rbertalotto

Explorer
Thanks......It just looks like if the ladder failed, the whole trailer would tip over. Not a concern if mounted on top of a two ton vehicle, but my new trailer only weighs 700 pounds loaded....
 

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shade

Well-known member
Thanks......It just looks like if the ladder failed, the whole trailer would tip over. Not a concern if mounted on top of a two ton vehicle, but my new trailer only weighs 700 pounds loaded....
I don't think it's possible to roll your trailer in that fashion. The outboard section would just drop past horizontal. Not good for the RTT, but I doubt your trailer would mind.
 

Spvrtan

Member
Yea, you'd have to be one heavy person(s) to tip the trailer and both would have to be sitting only on the half of the RTT that folds out.
 

shade

Well-known member
I don't think RTTs are strong enough for that to happen.

Without the ladder providing support, the overhead webbing would break free, the hinge would fail, and the moving side of the platform would fold down, dumping you on the ground. I'm not going to say that couldn't happen, but I've never heard of a failure like that occurring. @Box Rocket might have some real world experience with this.
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
I could see this happening if you opened over the rear of a single axle trailer that was unhitched. It might happen before you even got the ladder to the ground. You will note that lots of trailers have stabilizer jacks on the corners that help in both directions with tipping.
 

shade

Well-known member
I could see this happening if you opened over the rear of a single axle trailer that was unhitched. It might happen before you even got the ladder to the ground. You will note that lots of trailers have stabilizer jacks on the corners that help in both directions with tipping.
Yeah, that I can see, even without a dramatic ladder failure. Everything I said before was predicated on a side opening orientation, and less stupidity. :)
 

Mass_Mopar

Keep it simple stupid
The RTT does not need any support underneath the open side - by design. If you kick the ladder out it won't fold down past horizontal. Just don't use it as an engine hoist and you'll be fine. The ladder, properly setup, will prevent the open end from bouncing around though.

To keep the trailer rubber-side-down, I have a pair of jacks I deploy at the rear of my trailer and a pair of group 31 lead acids in the nose. If I stay hitched for the night and don't deploy the jacks, when you climb in the tent sometimes the nose of the trailer will lift the hitch up on the tow ball a little. Smaller trailers definitely benefit from having jacks at the corners to add to the stability.

 

Box Rocket

Well-known member
It's not the overhead webbing the keeps the tent from opening past horizontal. The bows the webbing are attached to would buckle if they were responsible for the load. It's actually the hinges and the base that interlock and "bottom out" against each other that are the primary thing keeping it from opening too far. The tent will support itself without the ladder deployed, but is not recommended to have people inside without the ladder extended and supporting the open side of the tent. With people inside the tent the ladder is the primary means of supporting the open side.
 

shade

Well-known member
Thanks. The Tepui hinges are beefy, but I wasn't sure if the underlying base they're anchored to was strong enough.
 
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