RR/LR3/4 EAS Front and Rear Valve Block Rebuild with Pictures!

#1
Symptom: Front end was sagging overnight, both sides equally so the diagnosis only makes sense that its a valve body.

I picked up the EAS valve block rebuild kits from British Parts of Utah for $35.00 a piece. I bought three sets, one for the front and rear and the other for the spares. The cost for 3 kits was less than one valve block by far so it was a wise purchase with significant savings. The kits are the same for front and back!

RR/LR3/4 Valve Block Rebuild Kit $35

Start to finish, the job was about an hour since I was documenting my steps to share with the portal! This job is really easy so do not be afraid to tackle it and save yourself some serious money.

Disclaimer: The parts look really clean because I took the photos on reassembly so it was easier for the readers to follow without dirty parts. My O-rings were dry rotted and the valve block had dirt inside of it between the halves, but not under the valves (most likely from water and mud submersion).

PREP: (I'M NOT GOING INTO DETAIL ON THIS AS IT NEEDS TO BE COMMON SENSE THAT THE SUSPENSION NEEDS TO BE SUPPORTED SO THE VEHICLE DOES NOT CRUSH SOMEONE WHEN THE AIR IS LET OUT OF THE BAGS AT THE VALVE BLOCK.
1) DISCONNECT THE BATTERY
2) SUPPORT THE VEHICLE IN A FASHION THAT THE FRAME IS SUPPORTED AND YOU CAN REMOVE THE RIGHT FRONT WHEEL. YOU WILL BE LETTING AIR OUT OF THE BAGS WHEN THE AIR LINES ARE OPENED AT THE VALVE BLOCK.

*******JACK AND SUPPORT THE VEHICLE ON JACK-STANDS AND REMOVE THE FRONT RIGHT WHEEL.********


Tools I used:

1) 12mm Wrench for the (3) three air lines.
2) T-20 torque bit to disassemble the valve block (4 torque screws and I used the bowl to stow them).
3) Tool of choice for your torque bit. I use my trusty Snap-on adjustable torque screw driver.
4) Pick kit! I have a few, but used on without a sharp point to remove the O-rings.
5) Blue Loctite and Vaseline for reassembly.
6) Spatula to disassemble the halves (Disregard, not needed but I thought I might need it so I had it out).
7) Lint free rags
8) Valve Block (front and rear are the same process)
9) Genuine LR Valve Block rebuild kit (Link below again in case you missed it)
RR/LR3/4 Valve Block Rebuild Kit $35

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Step 1: Remove the Valve Block. The front valve block is located in the front right of the bumper behind the inner wheel well protective skirt. I have TR Bumper so mine is easily accessible and it was off already for my alternator replacement. Getting the wheel, wheel well skirt, and access to the valve block is the longest and hardest part of the entire process.
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2) Disconnect the electrical connector, remove the air lines (3 x 12mm brass fittings). You can deflate the bags with the ID Tool if you wish, I chose to just slowly crack the fittings and let the air leak out. Use an open end 12mm combo wrench or line fitting wrench. Be careful as the housing is plastic and the fittings are brass. The black lines go from the valve block to the left and right air bags, the green is the main supply line from the EAS system.
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3) Lay it out and get ready to break it down. Do this in a clean area and be very careful when you remove the screws as the valves are spring loaded and will come apart and it is possible to lose parts.
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4) Remove the (4) four torque screws. Again, be careful as the housing is plastic and the can strip out on reassembly.

*******HOLD THE VALVE BLOCK HALVES TOGETHER AS THE SCREWS ARE REMOVED. THE VALVES INSIDE HAVE SPRINGS AND ARE UNDER LIGHT TENSION AND COULD POP OUT WHEN THE HALVES ARE SLIT******

5) Slowly split the halves once the screws are removed. There are three valves, the outside valves are identical and the center valve is different. Remember the orientation of the halves as it is possible to install the halves backwards (air lines and electrical connector have to be installed on opposite ends when you reassemble). You will not be able to install the electrical connector and lines if you install the halves backwards. I say this because I assembled it to see if the halves were different orientation and they are not.

More than likely, the valves will fall apart when you take them out. However, if you hold the halves tightly and slowly split them, the valves will stay inside the upper half if you are careful. AGAIN, THEY ARE SPRING LOADED SO EXPECT THEY WILL POP OUT AND FALL APART.
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6) Remove the valves. The outside two are identical, the center valve is different. The valves may stay together or they may fall apart. The black conical portions of the valves have clocking halves that hold them together for reassembly; more to follow on that part but my point is they most likely will not be locked when you remove them. Bottom line, lay them out like either of the pics below and you'll be good! NOTICE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE OUTSIDE AND CENTER VALVES.
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IF THE VALVES FALL APART, LAY THEM OUT LIKE THIS NEXT PICTURE TO INVENTORY THE PARTS BEFORE YOU CLEAN THEM. ALL OF THE SMALL BLACK PIECES ON THE VALVES HAVE "ONE OR MULTIPLE" O-RINGS INSTALLED ON THEM. In this picture, the new O-rings are placed on the right side of the pick so I can separate old from new and ensure I have a "one for one" when I reassemble. They will be laid out like this anyway for cleaning and assembly so don't sweat it if they fall apart.
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7) The top half may have O-rings stuck inside of it. Make sure a thorough inventory of old vs new O-rings.
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8) Clean all of your parts, inventory, and get ready to reassemble. Remember, much of this is plastic, I used soapy water on the top and diluted alcohol for the bottom (there is a circuit board inside). Be careful of the electrical assembly and do not use solvents.

Move on to Reassembly in the next post below! Don't forget to rehydrate with your tasty beverage of choice, you're halfway there!
 

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#3
Time for reassembly! This part is easy, I use Vaseline on the O-rings to keep them soft and easy to assemble. Being they are sealed in dry air system with some potential for moisture in the system, the Vaseline aids in assembly and will add life to your lovely new $35 rebuild kit.

The reassembly is for the most part identical to removal so I am not going to insult anyone's intelligence and put every step in here. However, if you have any questions, drop me a PM and I'll help out anytime.

The post will be just a few tricks and reassembly of the valves you'll want to know to aid in a speedy and flawless process.

The goal is to get the valves assembled like this before you mate the halves back together.
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1) O-ring Orientation is as such. The outside two are identical reassembly with (3) three O-rings, the center has (4) four O-rings.
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2) The center valve goes together like this: Take note of the location of the new O-rings. (4) four new O-rings installed.
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3) Install the spring inside the piston. Insert the piston with the small black O-ring toward the spring and the black rubber bumper "doo-dad" end out like the picture above!
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4) Reassembly of the two outside valves is identical. Once the new O-rings are installed in their proper places, connect the two valve halves together, lightly press the ends together, align the clock tabs, and rotate left against each other to lock the conical valve half and keeper together.

This first picture shows the two pieces I am talking about that lock together by rotation and alignment of the clocking tabs. Notice the conical piece has tabs, and the cap has clocking grooves that the tabs line up. Rotate the conical portion "left" to lock them together similar to left hand threads rotation. They will not go together if you attempt to rotate them right. This is not an assembled valve, just a picture to show an example of the clocking mechanism that holds the valve together for assembly.
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5) Assemble the outside valves by lightly pushing the two keeper and the conical end together to compress the spring. With all of the O-rings installed, gently push the conical portion into the keeper ring while aligning the clocking tabs. Once the tabs are aligned, rotate the conical portion "left" as in left-hand threads to lock the valve together for assembly into the valve block body. It is possible to rotate both pieces like the picture, but I found it easier to hold the round keeper end, and rotate just the conical end slightly to the left to engage the locking tabs. (There is no click for the lock, they just hold together by spring tension).
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6) It should now look like this! (3) three assembled valves ready to go into the block. Notice the new ORANGE O-rings installed in the upper block body.
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7) Install the halves together in the correct orientation so the air lines are on the opposite side of the electrical connector. Don't forget the ORANGE O-rings.
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8) Lightly, but firmly tighten the (4) four valve block torque screws that hold the halves together and reinstalled it back in the truck. I used blue locktite, its your preference. Apply dielectric grease in all of your electrical connectors.
BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL WHEN THREADING THE BRASS AIRLINES BACK INTO THE PLASTIC VALVE BODY AS YOU MAY STRIP THEM OUT.
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9) Reassemble the bumper, wheel well cover, and install the wheel! Safely remove the vehicle from the jack-stands, reconnect the battery while the truck is on fairly level ground. Start the vehicle and check for leaks and ensure the truck levels accordingly.

10) Enjoy your Landy on the first available trail!
 

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#5
THANK YOU FOR DOING THIS!

Definitely a winter overhaul item for me: compressor and valve blocks. Let's keep these rigs runnin'.
 
#7
Thank you for the detailed write-up. What spares would you recommend we have on hand for this, especially with the risks of damaging other components you outlined?
 
#8
To all the members, you're welcome, I am just paying it forward, but the thanks are appreciated!

I wanted to add, some of the pictures still show dirty parts, etc. it was all about taking the pictures, the valve is uber-clean on reassembly so disregard if some of the assembly photos actually have disassembly photos of dirty parts.....lol

@Hawkbeard I planned on doing both valve bodies (front and back) and I ordered a third for the spares box I keep in the vehicle just in case. When it comes to O-rings, I could easily match these with high-grade O-rings but it's much easier to just order it for $35 and have guaranteed genuine parts.

On that note, I have a spare kit in case I tore an O-ring on reassembly so I would say it was worth having an extra kit just in case and if you do not use it, that's a cheap $35 insurance policy on the shelf.

The compressor rebuild is next!
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#9
Is there supposed to be an outer seal gasket? It looks like there should be an outer rectangular shaped gasket that is missing, except where it goes around the holes. That would keep all the dirt and water away from the inner rings.
 
#10
Well done. There are so many parts on these vehicles that sometimes keeping up with things that can be done in our own garages doesn't always get on the maintenance schedule. I especially like the push together and turn arrows on your assembly views.
 
#11
I echo the thanks, this is an incredible resource. Front end on my '12 L322 is sagging and I think this is the culprit. For $35, what's the downside? Plus I get to learn about another part of how the truck works. Many, many thanks...
 
#12
@Swedjen I thought there would be as well but no, not according to parts manual either. I considered using a silicone bead around that area and might experiment with that when I get to the rear valve body hopefully this week.

On that note, the truck has been sitting now for four days without running and sits completely level with absolutely no sagging anymore!
 
#14
Nice write up Eric.

I changed the front block a few years ago but i have it in the garage. I may strip it down to see how it goes as my centre block could do with a rebuild.
Back rises then front comes up in it's own time. It's 14 years old now so a clean out and freshen up won't harm it.
 
#15
@A.J.M no worries brother! You are set up even better to have a rebuilt valve block on the shelf, that way you can swap the block out in a few minutes and rebuild the other for the shelf at your convenience.

My Landy levels out super fast now and the compressor is only on for a few seconds after leveling; I believe my leak was probably much worse than I originally imagined. My fear is I probably took a lot of cycle life off my compressor during that few months I was watching a "slow leak".

Cheers,

E
 
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