ROOF-TOP TENT - The SECRETS & Truth Must See FULL Review before You Buy

Wadz Up

New member
Hi guys,

I spent a lot of time research Rooftop tents and found a lot of the information from manufactures was either hidden, not provided or overstated, even misleading. I wanted to share this review because finding the facts wasn't always easy and more importantly understanding what the important key factors were was a bit of an undertaking as well. I was looking for a four season tent that did well in northern climates, could hold up in strong winds, heavy rains and even snow from time to time. I wanted a good looking durable long lasting tent for 3-4 people. Here's my review winter camping in of the Treeline Tent from Alberta Canada. I hope you find this helpful. WADZ

 

Ovrlnd Rd

Adventurer
Nice review and nice looking tent. However, I think $3800 (even in Canadian dollars) is a tad pricey for a soft shell tent.
 

Wadz Up

New member
Nice review and nice looking tent. However, I think $3800 (even in Canadian dollars) is a tad pricey for a soft shell tent.
Thanks! After doing my research Treeline is easily one of the most advanced soft shell RTTs on the market and your right, that investment does come at a cost. The thumbnail picture on the review I was on the waterfront and that night and an unexpected storm with 70 mph winds rolled in and hammered me with rain. Its nights like these that you'll be happy you didn't invest less in a tent but I get it, not everyone is going to want or be able to invest that but I've seen tents fold under snow loads and heavy wind and I never wanted to have to go threw that. Do you have to spend this much no, but its all what you feel you can afford, need and or want as your shelter to protect you. For me I've seen the differences first hand and felt the investment was worth it but its all relative to what your criteria is or what you value.
 

ITTOG

Active member
Looks like a nice tent. I liked how thick the panels are and all the windows. What is your affiliation with the company? I noticed your video on their website.
 

Wadz Up

New member
Looks like a nice tent. I liked how thick the panels are and all the windows. What is your affiliation with the company? I noticed your video on their website.
No affiliation, I shared my video review after testing and reviewing. Since day one my experience with Treeline Outdoors is exactly the personable support I wanted and everyone on there team has been very helpful. I believe and enjoy supporting the smaller businesses that pride themselves on quality and innovation and they are exactly that company.
 

aaen

Adventurer
Tree Line? Jesus it is the same manufacture of every other damn rtt in existance. Nothing innovative or better here then the other, especially at a 3800 price tag because it is Canadian company, they are not even manufactured in Canada. Buy a cat or Tepui and save some money.
 

Crazy Schooner

Fortune's A Mistress
Pretty much ^ plus they always have sales, no reason to spend msrp on the units. I wouldn't be surprised if they get their stuff from the same factory as Free Spirit Recreation if you look at their offerings. The Aspen hard shell they sell was tested by FSR but I can see they didn't decide to sell it, can't blame them. I had one, and wouldn't get another but at least Treeline were okay to deal with the first time around. Guarantee'd Treeline will have a derivative of the FSR automatic RTT (either plastic top or the new aluminum half model they are testing currently) on the market within a year or two. Best reason to get a Treeline is you like the colour offerings (the new gen rtt's has lots of colours), general shape of the windows or they are local'ish (as was my case with the Aspen, four hour drive, warehouse pickup).
 
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garretblack

New member
Looks like a nice soft top RTT. That base looks like the same that iKamper uses. Just FYI with that honeycomb base. Don’t crawl around without the mattress or something dispersing weight. Knees directly onto that floor may dent it. The overall panels will hold a Jeep in weight but small impacts will dent it. Just a trade off for light weight.

Expensive for a soft top but good to have options.
 

Webe

New member
Nicely done video. Good info for those that are just getting into the RTT interests. But yes it is like the Tepui, CVT, 32 degs etc. I got a CVT MT Bacholer summit. for $2500 shipped. It had the annex, diamond plate floor. I've owend a TEPUI for 6 years. It has done very well. But the floor is getting a little squishie do to being the laminated flooring.
 
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Wadz Up

New member
Tree Line? Jesus it is the same manufacture of every other damn rtt in existance. Nothing innovative or better here then the other, especially at a 3800 price tag because it is Canadian company, they are not even manufactured in Canada. Buy a cat or Tepui and save some money.
The same. Not even close. Not saying that there are not other great tents but the Treeline has some strong differentiatiors that resonated with me and I thought some other people might enjoy hearing about some of these key points. If your key criteria is to save money then your correct, this is not your tent. For me, I had much larger needs and live in a Northern Climate.

Here's are my top tent differentiators.

My Top Ten List:


1) Round overall design for better performance in wind/rain and snow. Most competitor tents are all square and boxy and look more like civil war style tents. They pool water and do not shed snow.

2) Rounded patented windows that roll up all the way to create a 360 degree view from your truck tree house. The windows can be rolled up in good weather to take advantage of the great view or they can be steaked out with the spring poles when the weather turns ugly or you are trying to shade the tent.

3) Patented clear PVC skylight in the extended part of the tent. This feature really gives you a true 360 degree view from within the tent. It also provides natural light in the annex room when all the windows are closed.

4) Th only company that has all the attachment points on the underside of the tent when deployed. The gear hammock, webbing for gear attachment and the 4 rubber latches that can take 40lbs of back packs or any other equipment.

5) Two skylights in the tent for the most amazing stargazing, most have none or only one.

6) The tent Fly is cut in a swallow tail design for better line of sight out of the back of the tent.

7) Two spring poles for each side of the back of the fly to hold up against high winds.

8) 380g/m2 weight of the tent body poly-cotton rip stop material. Most other tent companies are using 240-280g/m2 especially all the Australian and southern climate companies.

9) Aluminum Honeycomb base material. This base is the worlds best material to make a tent base out of. Durability, strength etc. Aluminium honey comb is used regularly in Aerospace construction because it is strong and very light weight.

10) All straps on this tent are double the thickness/strength of any other tent out there.

Bonus. Treeline annexes have zip in zip out floors starting at the middle of the front door. This way you can unzip half the floor to put in a shower or drill your holes in the ice for your ice fishing set up.

$2800 US is my opinion for one of the most advanced soft shells tents in the world, personally when it comes to shelter especially in northern climates Treeline tents met all my criteria's and adventure needs.
 
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Wadz Up

New member
In the spirit of accuracy I took your advice and re-vist Tepui for their comparable and not only is it more expensive $2950 vs $2800 US but many features do NOT exceed that of the Treeline benefits, feature and build.

Here the specs of the Tepui.

RUGGEDIZED SERIES AUTANA 4 $2,950.00!

The Ruggedized™ Autana 4 is the toughest roof top tent on the market.


  • Two built-in screened SKY panels which allow for a great view of the stars and surrounding trees when the rainfly is removed. (Treeline's rainfly has windows in rainfly so you can still see out) TEPUI you can't.
  • Diamond Plate Base------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------How thick?
  • 360g Dual Stitched Fabric (40% heavier than standard models)------------------------------------------------------------------------Treeline is 380g--------
  • Heavy duty 3-bolt hinges and welded aluminum base construction--------------------------------------------------------------------Treeline using a Aluminum honeycomb base
  • Fully enclosed annex featuring the same heavy duty material used for the tent canvas.-----------------------------------------------Treeline Annex has a front door window to bring light into the annex room area and to be able to see out the front entrance
-240 Lbs----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Treeline 175Lbs
 

aaen

Adventurer
So shocker here, I live in Alberta, been to there shop (granted a few years back, when I lived in the calgary area) and would not purchase this tent or support the the so called off-road gimmick shop in inglewood, that over prices everything, sorry side bar there. In fact of all the Canadians rtt manufactures, i wouldn’t support a single one of them. I’ve looked/touched at a lot of them as i’ve been all over the country for work and usually make it a point to check them out if I can . I’m all about supporting homegrown, but these so called cdn products do not sway me to support homegrown, when it’s still the same junk produced overseas, and is the same as every other damn manufactures rtt, except a few bells and whistles. Knowing that, I’d still support tepui or cvt. The reason being is they are well established and have been in the rtt game for awhile now and have a proven track record of good customer support. Tree line, I have heard zero good about, unless it was from fanboys, or people whom know the owners.

Full disclosure, I no longer use rtt’s of any kind and moved onto a camper or a drifter to be exact, so it is not about saving money or I would be back in a two man tent camping out of a 15 year old Honda Civic hatchback. Have Owned countless rtt’s, ground tents, hammmocks, James Baroud hard shell and used them all on numerous nights and for multi day trips. I’d steer clear of buying any of them again. Really to be honest one would be better off to go buy a used soft shell rtt then buying anything new these days, myself included as there is a plethora of them on the used market, Reason being is people learn to either love/hate them and right now they are a huge fad as this bs overlanding scene(ugh hate that term) has a pile of morons out in the woods who have no clue and just like to be trendy and they get out of it quickly once they have their gram cred acknowledged by taking the requisite photos and posting them up so they can get followers.

Anyways, We are all free to spend our money how we best see fit. Hope to see ya out on the trails, I’ll have a cold beverage ready and we can shoot the ****.
 
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Hoghead

Observer
Looks like a nice RTT, but IMO doesn't differentiate itself from CVT, Tepui, especially in the strength department. All of the little do-dads on the bottom of the base are a little different, but other than that not a lot. I will say it doesn't look like a complete copy of all of the other ones. I didn't see anything on their website that stated the thickness of the base either. Most of them have a honeycomb base.
 
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