Recommendation - durable 270 awning?

escadventure

Adventurer
There are a bunch out there, and some, like the Batwing look to be a bit fragile. I'm a magnet for really bad weather when camping so I'd like to find something really rugged.

Looking for some experienced reviews.
 

Markal

New member
Overland Vehicle Systems 270 working well for me so far. I’ve had only three nights out with it so far, but lots of wind (20-30 mph gusts) and it was not affected at all. I assume this thing will last, but time will tell.
 

ShamusTX

Observer
+1 to the Overland Vehicle System Nomadic 270 (non_LT version). The pictures below taken after a few inches of wet early season snow in CO. The awning had now issues with the snow or the gusty winds before the snow.
 

Attachments

This is in response to your comment re: Batwings and fragility.

If you haven’t already, check out Paul May’s (Equipt Expedition Outfitters) video on 270 awnings. He sells the Eezi Awn but brings up a really good point about all of these awnings…unless you’re absolutely sure about the weather conditions you should tie them down. Case in point: my Batwing was “origamied” on its maiden voyage along the Mojave Rd. We were just setting up in dead calm conditions (awning was not guyed down yet) when a huge dust devil dropped into our camp. Two of the Delrin hinges broke leaving the awning useless. The debate is whether it’s better to have “sacrificial” hinges like the Delrin units (I now carry spares for a relatively easy field repair) or rigid hinges which you may or may not be able to repair while traveling. I really like the self-supporting models (the Batwing is not, it sags without pole support) but I’m gun shy about unsupported deployment based on my experience.

I might add, I saw a self-supported awning bend…it didn’t completely break…in sustained 15 mph winds along the coast here. This was one that was supposed to handle up to 30 mph winds and where you could purportedly do pull-ups. The owner of the awning was not happy. Good luck with your research, I’m sure you’ll find something that meets your requirements. As always…YMMV as compared to mine.
 

4000lbsOfGoat

Well-known member
I've had a Darche Eclipse 270 for over a year now and in that time it has been setup\torn down at least 50 times (we've been living on the road for most of the last year). It has seen months of desert sun and been out in winds as high as 30mph - it's fine with gusts up to 15-20 in any direction, above that it depends on which way the wind is coming in. The arms have loosened up a bit but overall it's held up great to serious use.

Regardless of the awning you choose, I will stress the importance of good guy lines with these big awnings. The lines that come with the Darche (and I would suspect, others as well) are just basic skinny ropes with a plastic adjustment mechanism and they just don't cut it for any serious wind. I replaced all of those with elasticized webbing straps (mine are Rokstraps brand that I got at OE but I can't seem to find them online). With good straps the awning is very stable in the wind.

This is my setup if the wind forecast is anywhere above 15-20mph:

AwningSetup1.jpg
 

EMR714

New member
This is in response to your comment re: Batwings and fragility.

If you haven’t already, check out Paul May’s (Equipt Expedition Outfitters) video on 270 awnings. He sells the Eezi Awn but brings up a really good point about all of these awnings…unless you’re absolutely sure about the weather conditions you should tie them down. Case in point: my Batwing was “origamied” on its maiden voyage along the Mojave Rd. We were just setting up in dead calm conditions (awning was not guyed down yet) when a huge dust devil dropped into our camp. Two of the Delrin hinges broke leaving the awning useless. The debate is whether it’s better to have “sacrificial” hinges like the Delrin units (I now carry spares for a relatively easy field repair) or rigid hinges which you may or may not be able to repair while traveling. I really like the self-supporting models (the Batwing is not, it sags without pole support) but I’m gun shy about unsupported deployment based on my experience.

I might add, I saw a self-supported awning bend…it didn’t completely break…in sustained 15 mph winds along the coast here. This was one that was supposed to handle up to 30 mph winds and where you could purportedly do pull-ups. The owner of the awning was not happy. Good luck with your research, I’m sure you’ll find something that meets your requirements. As always…YMMV as compared to mine.
I have a very similar story with my Rhino Rack: also origamied on the maiden voyage. Broke two hinges and actually snapped one of the horizontal pieces in half. I have and love the OVS now but I still guy and peg every time since that rhino rack experience.
 
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AERONAUT outdoor

Supporting Sponsor / Approved Vendor
Check out the Kinsmen Awning - freestanding, super solid, folks have done pullups and hung hammocks from it.

Pricey (and I think a bit of a wait), but you get what you pay for!



1655313548188.png
 
+1 for alucab awning. Been using mine every weekend for 3 years now. Normal wear and tear. Been in downpouring rain and lots of wind. Does well. And whatever you get - Always stake it down. (no matter what the brochure says)
 

alia176

Explorer
This thread has info that might be useful, along with prices, weight, and dimensions.

 

TroyR

New member
Just installed so I don't have in the field experience with it yet. I put on a Bush Company 270 XT. Initial reaction is that it is extremely well built. It's also easy to deploy and put away. The storage bag is big enough that it's not a battle to get it put away. Time will tell what happens when winds hit.

IMG_4119.JPG
 

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