Recoating powder coated metal

kojackJKU

Autism Family Travellers!
So to answer a few questions here, as this is what I do for a living.

A) The best course of action would be to stop in and see your local coater, have them chemically stripped, outgassed, blasted, zinc primed, and then top coated. If they are just something like 2" angle iron, expect to spend about $18/ft for this job. If you do it without the zinc (I wouldn't) it would land you roughly in the $12/ft area. If you choose a textured finish it will hide a lot of the pitting. Alternatively you could have the pitting welded up and smoothed out, then top coated for a perfect finish.

B) To the guy above, you definitely CAN blast powder off, you just need a pressure pot and a large volume of air to do this efficiently. I blast powder off with a 260cfm compressor and a pressure pot. Chemically stripping it easier and my preferred method.

C) Spray paint would be a pretty poor option as it will not last nor will it adhere well to the powder. You would be better off using something like a rubberized bed liner.
I am agreeing 100 percent. from coater to coater, that is the exact same thing I recommend!
 

precision powder

Backwoods Explorer
OP if you shoot me a message I will find you someone in your area that is a credible coater that will take care of you. I have a few friends out in Cali that own custom shops.
 

Ducky's Dad

Explorer
I would say that applying rust converter to clean metal is pointless because for it to work, it requires rust to be present.
The metal is not likely to be completely clear of rust. A quick coat of converter on the bare spots is good, cheap insurance against rust continuing to work under the final finish.

If I ran a powdercoating shop, I would also recommend blasting and recoating. But since I don't, and since properly applied paint will work just fine for OP's purposes, I still recommend paint.
 

Kiriesh

Adventurer
The metal is not likely to be completely clear of rust. A quick coat of converter on the bare spots is good, cheap insurance against rust continuing to work under the final finish.

If I ran a powdercoating shop, I would also recommend blasting and recoating. But since I don't, and since properly applied paint will work just fine for OP's purposes, I still recommend paint.
I ended up giving paint a try since... well I had rattle cans left over from a bed rack I'm doing and figured it doesn't harm it at all. Sanded all the rust spots I could find down to bare metal again, scuffed the powdercoating with some sandpaper, and gave it a couple coats of paint. Seems to have adhered just fine, and if it doesn't hold up I can always strip it and get it powdercoated again.
 

javajoe79

Fabricator
The metal is not likely to be completely clear of rust. A quick coat of converter on the bare spots is good, cheap insurance against rust continuing to work under the final finish.

If I ran a powdercoating shop, I would also recommend blasting and recoating. But since I don't, and since properly applied paint will work just fine for OP's purposes, I still recommend paint.
I see what you're getting at but I don't think it works like that. From what I know, you should only apply it over rust. It can prevent paint from sticking to bare metal otherwise.
 

kojackJKU

Autism Family Travellers!
Ducky's Dad,

FYI, I also have a paint booth for painting things as well. Painting is not what I recommend for this application. I CAN do it....I would NOT recommend it. I have a complete fabrication shop/small engine shop/custom MOTORSPORTS shop. I build custom motorcycles/atv/UTV/snowmobiles...as well I am building trailers etc for off roading with UTVs and OHRVs!
 

precision powder

Backwoods Explorer
I would have to agree. While I do have a full paint, ceramic, and powder setup....each has a time and a place. This isn't really the place for the paint. For what it will cost to just have is stripped and coated the right way, it wouldn't make sense to paint it. You will spend far more money over the lifetime of the product repainting it every year than you would if you just stripped it, blasted it, zinc primed it, and top coated it. It will last a lifetime if coated correctly. I can't even count the number of bumpers, wheels, diff covers, skid plates, and truck racks I have stripped and recoated because people have painted them and it just wasnt durable. There is a reason so many things come powder coated, its far far more durable.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Excellent info. I have two Ranch Hand grill guards that needs redoing. This info has helped me decide on having them re powder coated. Heck, one of these has a real history of keeping a very large cow out of my GMC grill!
 
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Ducky's Dad

Explorer
Spray paint would be a pretty poor option as it will not last nor will it adhere well to the powder. You would be better off using something like a rubberized bed liner.
I am not arguing that powder isn't better than paint, because in most applications it is better. The question is whether it makes sense for OP's application. If he wants to spend the time and money for powder coat, that is just fine. Were it my truck, I would prep and paint the stuff.

nor will it adhere well to the powder
That would only be true for guys who do not properly prep and paint the surface.


From what I know, you should only apply it over rust. It can prevent paint from sticking to bare metal otherwise.
Paint sticks just fine if you prep the surface properly. My current favorite rust converter is from Jamestown Distributors, made for salt water marine applications. Works for me, no paint issues.
 
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