Rear tire carrier mounted camp/work light build

TangoBlue

American Adventurist
Part I.

Inspired by other threads from this forum we built a light for the rear bumper swing-out tire carrier for my Tacoma that's been working flawlessly for the last 9 months of travel and use this past season. Special thanks to Iron Pig Off Road and Vince (Skrewball) whose skill translates concept into reality.

Its intended use is to light a site for late night camp emplacement or as an area work light for field repairs. The criteria for this project is durability, ease of deployment, low power consumption, bright, wide field of illumination, and low cost.

Some of you have seen this on the road throughout the US and Canada this year already, but Iowa Law Enforcement cameras capture it best...

 
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TangoBlue

American Adventurist
Part II.

Major Components:

From another thread on this forum I learned of these lights from DDM tuning - http://www.ddmtuning.com/Product-Categories/LED-Bulbs-Lights/Truck-Trailer



I selected this Hi Power 116mm Round Off-Road Flood Light which uses 6 x 3W Hi Power LED bulbs with a 1350 Lumen output per unit. Can be used on 9-32 volt systems; lifespan: up to 120,000 hours; 1.5A current draw; IP 67 Waterproof; Stainless Steel mounting kit; 1.45lbs.;aluminum housing and acrylic lens.

 

TangoBlue

American Adventurist
Part III.

Painter's Extension Pole from Lowe's; fiberglass handle and extruded aluminum shaft; extendable from 2-4 feet.



Discarded automobile coiled cable cell phone charger.



Stainless steel M-8 nuts, bolts, washers, lock washer, spring washer.
Electrical shrink wrap.
Automotive brake line.
Nylon cable 1/2" cable holders.
Self tapping screws.
Cable loom.
Conduit bracket (2), 1 1/2".
Electrical wiring.
 

TangoBlue

American Adventurist
Part IV.

Narrative Instructions:

The painter's pole was disassembled; the cast metal threaded roller post was removed from the aluminum shaft by its 2 screws; the screw post was cut at the collar removing the threads and discarded. This left a platform for the light bracket and revealed a small opening large enough for an M8 bolt; internally it was large enough to capture an M8 nut. Assembled light bracket to the pole with the addition of a spring washer to allow for horizontal and vertical light aiming via the axis of the bracket. A 1/4" hole was drilled in the aluminum shaft near the end to allow for internal routing of the light wiring. The cell charger cable serves as the poles internal wiring; it's coiling allows for the easy extension and retraction of the light wiring. Pole is mounted to the swing-out; the tire carrier was drilled and tapped and the pole is secured to the carrier by 2 conduit brackets and 4 stainless steel screws. I chose to cover the fiberglass pole with appropriately sized shrink-wrap and the bottom is covered with an end-cap shrink-wrap material. The wiring is spliced and then routed through pole and brake conduit, bent to match the pole placement, and secured with cable holders and self-tapping screws into the carrier. Subsequently, power and switching is drawn from an existing power distribution box in the bed of the truck (from a previous modification).

Application photos:









 
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ExpoMike

Well-known member
Nice write up.

Currious, how is the light output? I am thinking of adding a couple backup lights to supplement the weak factory lights. It's nice that DDM is local to me but since I would only be able to test them in daylight hours if I go there, I am currious how the night time brightness is.

Thanks.
 

JeepTreeHouse

Adventurer
I actually just took delivery of this same light to do a similar setup on my truck. I haven't even started the installation process yet (thank goodness - as I'll be borrowing a few ideas :) ) but I have plugged in the light to 12 volt and it can be blinding. If the op doesn't put up a picture I can try to get one tonight.

Great work by the way! Oddly enough IPOR is building my swing out next week so hopefully I can fab up something similar to your work light!
 

TangoBlue

American Adventurist
Nice write up.

Currious, how is the light output? I am thinking of adding a couple backup lights to supplement the weak factory lights. It's nice that DDM is local to me but since I would only be able to test them in daylight hours if I go there, I am currious how the night time brightness is.

Thanks.
I'm not skilled enough to take night picks with my PAS camera, but 1350 lumen, whatever that means. To put it in plain terms Mike, it's been observed about the light in operation, "that's freakin' bright," "retina-searing," "hey, turn off that light - it hurts my eyes," and, "that's so bright you could turn a Norwegian troll into stone." Most recently on a trip in Gore, VA, we prepared, served, and dined on a meal of roasted pork tenderloin and Kim-chi fried rice under the light. The other nice thing about the LED is that it does not attract insects in the same volume as incandescent lights.
 
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TangoBlue

American Adventurist
Oddly enough IPOR is building my swing out next week so hopefully I can fab up something similar to your work light!
Really? Cool! I like it and use it more than I thought I would; next I want to extend the wiring so I can switch it in the cab too. Let me know and I'll swing by so you can check it out. Be sure to mention it to IPOR - they can give me a call.
 

ExpoMike

Well-known member
I'm not skilled enough to take night picks with my PAS camera, but 1350 lumen, whatever that means. To put it in plain terms Mike, it's been observed about the light in operation, "that's freakin' bright," "retina-searing," "hey, turn off that light - it hurts my eyes," and, "that's so bright you could turn a Norwegian troll into stone." Most recently on a trip in Gore, VA, we prepared, served, and dined on a meal of roasted pork tenderloin and Kim-chi fried rice under the light. The other nice thing about the LED is that it does not attract insects in the same volume is incandescent lights.
Alrighty then! Guess that answered that question. LOL :sombrero:
 

boknows

Adventurer
Tango Blue, you are an animal. I've never been jealous of another man's pole until now, thanks for the writeup! I already have a back up on the swing-away of my Jeep and plan to move it to a higher location using your solution. I've got mine running on a three way in cab switch.

Up position: the light pulls power directly from the battery
Neutral position: Light is off
Down position: light is activated when vehicle is in reverse.

can we get a close up picture of the top of the pole where the light bracket is connected?
 

TangoBlue

American Adventurist
More detailed pics of my pole as you requested. Keep in mind the shaft is not fully extended.

Picture of my pole from the rear...



Picture of my pole from the front...



Note: the bracket has an M8 bolt, light bracket, spring washer, M8 nut, modified (threaded portion cut off) pole collar, washer, and M8 ny-lock nut mounted internally and captured by the the modified collar. Stainless steel hardware. Aluminum shaft drilled below original screw hole for wire internal routing as shown in the first picture. Screws fore and aft on the shaft are original to the painters pole and secure the screw collar to the shaft. Complete 360 degree rotation limited only by the wire.

He said pole... ;)
 

bfdiesel

Explorer
This thread sounds so dirty out of context.

I do like how you executed mounting your shaft. Looks very useful.
 
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