Ready Welder battery powered spool gun, up to 350 amps from 36 volts.

#1
Link to the Ready Welder company: http://readywelder.com/

The Ready Welder is designed to be powered by deep-cycle batteries wired in series, which allows one to charge batteries from 110V electrical outlets, or vehicles, and still have a high current welding capability at home or in the field.

As many of us are planning to have (or have) deep-cycle batteries in our vehicles, the addition of a Ready Welder spool gun is a cost effective way to add some hefty welding capability that 110V welders can’t achieve. Many 220V welders can’t match the capacity either.

I have an old model that has served me well. I am NOT connected to Ready Welder. 😀
 
#2
I got mine off of craigslist years ago. Mine is the military version with all kinds of options to power it up and extra doodads. Id like to hear how you usually power yours, what you have used it for and maybe see some of the results. Were you stick welding with batteries before you got the Ready Welder? Is it your primary welder at home? Are you using flux core or gas?
 
#3
I got mine off of craigslist years ago. Mine is the military version with all kinds of options to power it up and extra doodads. Id like to hear how you usually power yours, what you have used it for and maybe see some of the results. Were you stick welding with batteries before you got the Ready Welder? Is it your primary welder at home? Are you using flux core or gas?
I powered it early on with four 6 volt batteries in series and later with two or three 12 volt batteries in series depending on what I needed for current.

I’ve always used flux core wire in it. I’ve thought about a full gas setup, but never thought I did enough with it often enough to justify switching from flux core wire even though it is my primary welder.

I’ve never stick welded. I learned to weld with on the job instruction (using a Miller Synchrowave 350) at a summer gig TIG welding broken aluminum propeller blades at a propeller repair shop. I’d build up the blades (often half of each blade was missing), blend the welds, sand to shape, hammer the blade cup, balance, paint, and return it to the customer. I came across the Ready Welder a few years later, bought one, and taught myself to weld steel.

My first project of any size was welding a heavy brushguard to my Jeep’s aftermarket front bumper, a pair of ladders and swing-out spare-tire carrier to the aftermarket rear bumper, and a roof rack from the front to the back. I welded in 3/4 #9 flat expanded metal mesh to create a platform to be able to carry 4x8 sheets of plywood and to be able to pitch a tent well off the ground. I made good use of it, even if it was a bit top heavy. 😀

The roof rack was bolted to the brushguard and to the ladders/tire-carrier. I eventually removed it, then built a second smaller and lighter roof rack that ran from the ladders/tire-carrier to just in front of my windshield and down to my rocker-skids.

A couple of years later I designed and welded a frame for a camper. Same track width, hub bolt pattern and tires as on my Jeep. I built the camper body out of 2x and plywood, and bobbed the back at a 45 for clearance. Although the trailer body was only about 10.5 feet long, I used a long tongue with a pintle hook and ring hitch that allowed me to turn the Jeep within 90 degrees of the tongue without making contact.

I sold the Jeep, and then the trailer, a number of years ago.

Sorry, but I don’t think I have any pictures of them.
 
#4
I got mine off of craigslist years ago. Mine is the military version with all kinds of options to power it up and extra doodads. Id like to hear how you usually power yours, what you have used it for and maybe see some of the results. Were you stick welding with batteries before you got the Ready Welder? Is it your primary welder at home? Are you using flux core or gas?
Sorry, I meant to ask you the same questions when I responded to your questions, but I’ll ask now. 😀
 
#5
At home I have a traditional Mig. It welds great and I have control over voltage and wire speed. With shielding gas I get nice welds. It takes less than a minute to set it up. If I was to use the ready welder at home I would need to gather batteries together I would have less control over wire speed and voltage and would have hot but ugly welds. It would probably take 15 minutes to get it set up. If going on a trip the ready welder takes up a lot of space for an item that is seldom used. I already carry jumper cables and a soft helmet and welding rods take up very little space. IMy ready welder seemed like a great idea, and if youy are doing hardcore offroading and anticipate lots of breakage that welding could repair it might make sense, mine is holding down a shelf in the garage and collecting dust.
 
#6
At home I have a traditional Mig. It welds great and I have control over voltage and wire speed. With shielding gas I get nice welds. It takes less than a minute to set it up. If I was to use the ready welder at home I would need to gather batteries together I would have less control over wire speed and voltage and would have hot but ugly welds. It would probably take 15 minutes to get it set up. If going on a trip the ready welder takes up a lot of space for an item that is seldom used. I already carry jumper cables and a soft helmet and welding rods take up very little space. IMy ready welder seemed like a great idea, and if youy are doing hardcore offroading and anticipate lots of breakage that welding could repair it might make sense, mine is holding down a shelf in the garage and collecting dust.
It appears your home and away welding setups work well for you. 😀

For people who can’t or won’t buy a 220V welder (or don’t have easy access to a 220V outlet), the Ready Welder might be a good solution at home as well as in the field. Some quick-disconnects for batteries and jumper cables would help reduce the space needed to take one on (or off 😎) the road. I still store mine in the plastic briefcase it came in. It doesn’t take up much space in my truck. About $600 US to buy new: https://www.amazon.com/Ready-Welder-10000-Battery-Operated/dp/B004N31LUI
 
#8
Useless info.

I love my little "prototype" Ready welder". It's probably 35yrs old? Came out before ReadyWelder became a product. Has off the shelf 240v innards. Wire feed motor and control is powered by chucking up a variable speed drill to a post on the back end of it. I used a light weight battery powered 12v drill. Light weight cause it was suppose to be comfortable for a small woman thus the battery pack for drill you could put on your belt and a cord ran to the drill. Welder could use Gas or flux. Hook it to as many auto/truck batteries as you need (and have cables for) to power the welding. No circuit board. Yup with the drill it is two hand welding cause it is gangly but it works awesome. Battery for the drill is dead now so I'll do this with it....

http://www.instructables.com/id/Run-A-Drill-Off-A-Car-Battery/

Have not used it a ton, but it can weld just fine. Have had a few welding courses since then. Bet I'm way better with it now than before. Looks something like this home made version http://www.instructables.com/id/SpoolGun/
 
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#9
I love my little "prototype" Ready welder". It's probably 35yrs old? Came out before ReadyWelder became a product. Has off the shelf 240v innards. Wire feed motor and control is powered by chucking up a variable speed drill to a post on the back end of it. I used a light weight battery powered 12v drill. Light weight cause it was suppose to be comfortable for a small woman thus the battery pack for drill you could put on your belt and a cord ran to the drill. Welder could use Gas or flux. Hook it to as many auto/truck batteries as you need (and have cables for) to power the welding. No circuit board. Yup with the drill it is two hand welding cause it is gangly but it works awesome. Battery for the drill is dead now so I'll do this with it....

http://www.instructables.com/id/Run-A-Drill-Off-A-Car-Battery/

Have not used it a ton, but it can weld just fine. Have had a few welding courses since then. Bet I'm way better with it now than before. Looks something like this home made version http://www.instructables.com/id/SpoolGun/
One 12V deep cycle for the drill, two or three for the welder, and you’ll be good to go! 😎
 
#10
One 12V deep cycle for the drill, two or three for the welder, and you’ll be good to go! 😎
could or ...... two or three for welding and pull 12v off one of them directly. Drill will draw so little it won't pull too much from the one battery to throw things off balance don't suspect. Beside my trucks got 4 battery and it's a 12v 24v system already (series parallel arrangement) wiring it up to plug this into.... is pretty far down on the list though.
 
#11
could or ...... two or three for welding and pull 12v off one of them directly. Drill will draw so little it won't pull too much from the one battery to throw things off balance don't suspect. Beside my trucks got 4 battery and it's a 12v 24v system already (series parallel arrangement) wiring it up to plug this into.... is pretty far down on the list though.
I was joking about a dedicated 12V deep-cycle battery to replace a 12V drill battery, but, other than the (understandably pretty far down on the list) wiring, you are good to! 😀
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
#13
Back in the 20TH century we just used 1/8" 5P rod (6010/11 & variants) or 5/32s (deck rod-levels better), 6022, I think with a welding shield and stinger powered by 2 starting batteries & a jumper cable (that you should be carrying in any case)... no need to get fancy; IMO... since getting old/slow I don't even bother to bring a welder, or spare axle shafts anymore..
Folks unfamiliar with stick welding may forget to chip the flux off their welds...(NOTE: SAFETY GOGGLES REQUIRED).

BTW I have blown holes in 1/4" plate using 3 healthy starting batteries (36 volts).
If you cant strike an arc; check your connections.
If the rod goes up in flames revers the polarity.
When the rod starts to stick; recharge the batteries (the vehicle will usually still start).
 
#14
Back in the 20TH century we just used 1/8" 5P rod (6010/11 & variants) or 5/32s (deck rod-levels better), 6022, I think with a welding shield and stinger powered by 2 starting batteries & a jumper cable (that you should be carrying in any case)... no need to get fancy; IMO... since getting old/slow I don't even bother to bring a welder, or spare axle shafts anymore..
Folks unfamiliar with stick welding may forget to chip the flux off their welds...(NOTE: SAFETY GOGGLES REQUIRED).

BTW I have blown holes in 1/4" plate using 3 healthy starting batteries (36 volts).
If you cant strike an arc; check your connections.
If the rod goes up in flames revers the polarity.
When the rod starts to stick; recharge the batteries (the vehicle will usually still start).
Another (very) low cost way of welding materials thicker than a 110V welder could handle.

I suspect the wire-feed Ready Welder would be easier to learn than stick-welding for people who don’t know how to weld at all.