Range hood vents

glennm01

Member
How do most people handle the issue of venting cooking odors to the outside? I've been looking at RV range hoods for my build, and while there seem to be plenty of fine options out there, I'm having a hard time finding a vent cover for the outside wall that doesn't scream "typical cheap RV plastic garbage." All due respect to cheap RVs and plastic garbage everywhere, that is... Anyway, is there a preferred method that's used by the expo camper crowd for this? Maybe just go ductless and filter/recirculate the air? Not nearly as good as ducted, but better than nothing.
 

1000arms

Well-known member
How do most people handle the issue of venting cooking odors to the outside? I've been looking at RV range hoods for my build, and while there seem to be plenty of fine options out there, I'm having a hard time finding a vent cover for the outside wall that doesn't scream "typical cheap RV plastic garbage." All due respect to cheap RVs and plastic garbage everywhere, that is... Anyway, is there a preferred method that's used by the expo camper crowd for this? Maybe just go ductless and filter/recirculate the air? Not nearly as good as ducted, but better than nothing.
I highly suggest a vent, especially with the small volume of a vehicle compared to a home.

Are you looking for something like https://www.lowes.com/pd/IMPERIAL-4-in-Dia-Galvanized-Steel-R2-Exhaust-Dryer-Vent-Hood/4177177

Keep in mind that you could cut the tube to needed length and paint the outside part of it. The one I linked has a damper, but I'm not sure how well that would work when the vehicle is moving.

One concern I do have is directing cooking fumes down against the side of the vehicle.
 

glennm01

Member
Here are a couple examples of the typical RV vents out there:


Here's a standard residential one that would maybe work better than the one linked above, as it has those flaps to prevent stuff from getting up in there when the fan is off, and is also quite a bit more streamlined:


I'm not wild about having an additional hole in the wall, along with the resulting potential weak spot insulation-wise. How do the higher-end manufacturers handle this in their builds? (Earthroamer, Earthcruiser, GXV, etc...)

Maybe a non-ducted range hood (with a grease filter) in conjunction with running a MaxxAir roof vent fan and windows cracked would achieve the same thing?
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

The Alchemist, 25th Anniversary: A Fable About Following ...
by Paulo Coelho
From $10.47
Into Africa
by Sam Manicom
From $25.52
Adventure Motorcycling Handbook: A Route & Planning Guide
by Chris Scott
From $10.09
Cycling the Great Divide: From Canada to Mexico on North ...
by Michael McCoy, venture Cycling Association
From $9.99
Have you tried looking for vents designed for marine use? Usually spendy, but high quality.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

1000arms

Well-known member
... I'm not wild about having an additional hole in the wall, along with the resulting potential weak spot insulation-wise. ...
How wild are you about keeping stuff out of your lungs, hair, clothing, bedding, ...? :cool: You mentioned a grease filter, so I suspect if you might be frying something at some point.

... Maybe a non-ducted range hood (with a grease filter) in conjunction with running a MaxxAir roof vent fan and windows cracked would achieve the same thing?
This would help a bit, but wouldn't accomplish anywhere near the same thing as a range hood with direct venting to the outside. Keep in mind that with a range hood vented to the outside, you will need to replace the air removed through open windows and/or intake vents.

You are working with an enclosed space with a small volume of air. One fart in an auditorium will spread out and (largely) dissipate in the air. One fart in a sealed and insulated closet is going to last and last and last. My guess is that your build is much closer to a closet than an auditorium. I suggest you plan the range hood as part of your overall fresh air system and remember than you can use it even when you aren't cooking.
 

glennm01

Member
I agree that venting to the outside is clearly the ideal. What I'd like to know is how others are dealing with this matter in their expedition builds. I haven't noticed these typical RV-style vents on Earthroamers and other such rigs, but I assume they must be doing something to vent cooking fumes. Anyone know?
 

1000arms

Well-known member
I agree that venting to the outside is clearly the ideal. What I'd like to know is how others are dealing with this matter in their expedition builds. I haven't noticed these typical RV-style vents on Earthroamers and other such rigs, but I assume they must be doing something to vent cooking fumes. Anyone know?
Cooking fumes aren't specifically mentioned, but I wonder if one of the Earthroamer fans is mounted in the right place to exhaust them. See https://earthroamer.com/heating-ventilation-air-conditioning/
 

Joe917

Explorer
We live in our truck full time. We have a Fantastic fan in the roof almost over the cooktop. It works well to pull out steam and fumes. A dedicated range hood is not needed if you have good ventilation.
 

1000arms

Well-known member
We live in our truck full time. We have a Fantastic fan in the roof almost over the cooktop. It works well to pull out steam and fumes. A dedicated range hood is not needed if you have good ventilation.
Cooking fumes aren't specifically mentioned, but I wonder if one of the Earthroamer fans is mounted in the right place to exhaust them. See https://earthroamer.com/heating-ventilation-air-conditioning/
I agree that venting to the outside is clearly the ideal. What I'd like to know is how others are dealing with this matter in their expedition builds. I haven't noticed these typical RV-style vents on Earthroamers and other such rigs, but I assume they must be doing something to vent cooking fumes. Anyone know?
1) One could mount a good vent fan in the roof over (or almost over) the cooktop and open window for air flow.

2) One could use a good vent fan with open windows for airflow and use a range hood with the exhaust hose pushing air in to the good vent fan.

3) One could use a range hood to push the air directly outside.

I prefer to go with the 3rd choice I listed, but OP might want to go with the 2nd choice. I like metal range hoods, strong fans, and direct ventilation, but I have a very good sense of smell and like (very) fresh air. YVMV. :)

To save someone else the effort, I'll mention that, yes, one could just cook outside at all times, but I don't think that is what the OP wants to do. :cool:
 

loonwheeler

Adventurer
In our camper we have a similar setup to Joe917. A window directly in front of the two burner cooktop and a Fantastic Fan just above. Open both up during cooking and the fumes and moisture seem to be pretty well controlled. Main downside is you are cleaning the window after cooking in some cases. Works well for us and is easy to plan for if you are at the right stage of a build or remodel.
 
Top