Ram Tradesman w/power wagon option VS Gladiator rubicon/mojave (turned into a Power Wagon build thread)

phsycle

Adventurer
Honestly i can't even see out of my back window on my softopper when its dirty, and hardly when its clean lol. I might need to swap for a windowless panel.
One trip down a dirt road, I literally had to scrub like crazy at the car wash to see again. Solid panel is the way to go.
 

GreggNY

Well-known member
PW is a great offroad rig, but a terrible overlanding rig. It has literally no payload, at around 1K. Make sure the check the door sticker of the vehicle you want. If you have the VIN, you can put it into this website page to get your actual payload for your specific rig: https://www.ramtrucks.com/towing-guide.html
Far from a ‘terrible’ overlanding rig. The PW does have lower payload than most other full size trucks, but also makes up for it in far better off road factory performance than most other full size trucks. Not all overlanders need to carry 5,000 lbs of extra gear or multiple passengers eating up payload. My PW has exceeded all my overlanding needs. Just my .02

Also, see my reply above about payload. I’ve probably got the lowest possible payload with my Laramie trim configuration and am still not close to 1,000lbs
 
Last edited:

Pnwfullsize

Active member
Far from a ‘terrible’ overlanding rig. The PW does have lower payload than most other full size trucks, but also makes up for it in far better off road factory performance than most other full size trucks. Not all overlanders need to carry 5,000 lbs of extra gear or multiple passengers eating up payload. My PW has exceeded all my overlanding needs. Just my .02

Also, see my reply above about payload. I’ve probably got the lowest possible payload with my Laramie trim configuration and am still not close to 1,000lbs
Not to mention, most who buy 3/4 and 1 ton trucks for the purpose of overlanding end up swapping suspension to get better offroad capability or a better ride, thus reducing payload, although their door sticker doesnt say so.
 

GreggNY

Well-known member
Not to mention, most who buy 3/4 and 1 ton trucks for the purpose of overlanding end up swapping suspension to get better offroad capability or a better ride, thus reducing payload, although their door sticker doesnt say so.
Exactly. And along those same lines, most people aren't figuring in the PW already has a 100lb winch, heavier wheels and tires, steel bumpers, etc figured into its payload number. Once you throw those on a street truck with a 'higher' payload, you can knock off another few hundred pounds from that sticker.
 

Explorerinil

Observer
Exactly. And along those same lines, most people aren't figuring in the PW already has a 100lb winch, heavier wheels and tires, steel bumpers, etc figured into its payload number. Once you throw those on a street truck with a 'higher' payload, you can knock off another few hundred pounds from that sticker.
That’s a valid point, I also think the payload is lower also since the truck sits up higher and there may be more of a chance of a roll over when sitting up higher.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
Exactly. And along those same lines, most people aren't figuring in the PW already has a 100lb winch, heavier wheels and tires, steel bumpers, etc figured into its payload number. Once you throw those on a street truck with a 'higher' payload, you can knock off another few hundred pounds from that sticker.
Are the bumpers on the PW different than a regular 2500? I always thought they were the same.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
Same just black vs chrome.
That’s what I figured. So realistically, maybe 200lbs at most, considering winch, skid plates, and LT tires. With really, the flexy suspension playing the biggest part of the payload difference.

I’m curious what aftermarket suspension does to payload if they put it through the factory test. It’d be interesting to find out.
 

jadmt

Well-known member
That’s what I figured. So realistically, maybe 200lbs at most, considering winch, skid plates, and LT tires. With really, the flexy suspension playing the biggest part of the payload difference.

I’m curious what aftermarket suspension does to payload if they put it through the factory test. It’d be interesting to find out.
I am sure the lockers front and rear add some weight as does the electric sway bar disconnect motor. but I would say yes it is the softer longer coils that are the biggest difference makers. I do not think you will find any suspension company willing to spend the money to get the PW gvwr re-certified. It would cost a fortune for what would amount to low volume sales. I asked the owner of AEV about doing some rear coils for the PW to increase payload and he said one the problems was with the articulink when you added weight in the back it was also the front end that caused issues. So while a full suspension like AEV, Carli or Thuren might make it so your PW could handle more payload it won't change the GVWR that was issued at the factory.
 
Last edited:

Explorerinil

Observer
Same just black vs chrome.
To be technical , they aren’t the same. They have a different powder coat finish compared to the other bumpers, it’s also listed in your build sheet. I went through this mess after being rear ended by a dui driver. Body shop explained it to me.
 

Trixxx

Well-known member
Exactly. And along those same lines, most people aren't figuring in the PW already has a 100lb winch, heavier wheels and tires, steel bumpers, etc figured into its payload number. Once you throw those on a street truck with a 'higher' payload, you can knock off another few hundred pounds from that sticker.
I have a 2020 F250 Tremor with the 6.7L diesel. My payload is 2850 lbs. It came stock with 35” tires which are definitely heavier than the Power Wagons 33”.

Also - the 7.3 Gas Tremor has a significantly higher payload than mine (its, and the F350 which is identical in every way but the door emblem, is even higher.

You can add 1300 lbs to the Tremor and still have as much left as the Power Wagon has stock.

Not bashing the PW at all. It’s an insanely capable vehicle. It just falls short of some other full sized trucks by quite a bit in payload and towing.
 

RoyJ

Adventurer
Not to mention, most who buy 3/4 and 1 ton trucks for the purpose of overlanding end up swapping suspension to get better offroad capability or a better ride, thus reducing payload, although their door sticker doesnt say so.
Very good point, most people don't realize the minute we mod our trucks, factory rating goes out the window. A singled dually, with long travel suspension, does NOT retain the factory 6000 lbs payload.

I like to stress the PW is only limited by its suspension - the rest of the chassis is functionally identical to a non-Aisin Cummins dually that tows 20k+ pounds, and well over 7000 lbs payload.

LC folks like to throw the word "over-built" around, but I believe the PW is the only true over-built OEM truck on the market. You have a 11.5" AAM that can tow 22k lbs behind a dually, and a 6.4 Hemi / 50ksi frame (minor suspension mount diff) that carries 7,680lbs in a reg cab dually. With long travel air bags, you're only limited by tire for payload.
 

RoyJ

Adventurer
I have a 2020 F250 Tremor with the 6.7L diesel. My payload is 2850 lbs. It came stock with 35” tires which are definitely heavier than the Power Wagons 33”.

Also - the 7.3 Gas Tremor has a significantly higher payload than mine (its, and the F350 which is identical in every way but the door emblem, is even higher.

You can add 1300 lbs to the Tremor and still have as much left as the Power Wagon has stock.

Not bashing the PW at all. It’s an insanely capable vehicle. It just falls short of some other full sized trucks by quite a bit in payload and towing.
All true, but we're limited by physics.

Put on stiffer suspension, people will complain the RTI has gone down. Put cross-linked air bags like a Range Rover, people complain it's too complex when it goes into limp mode. Build the frame flexible like a Mog, people complain road manners are not refined enough...

Ford and Ram both chose to make a compromise. We're lucky as consumers because we can pick which set of compromises out of the two trucks, based on individual need.
 
Top