Protecting your Rear Hatch Kitchen

carbon60

Explorer
Those of you that have nicely integrated kitchen setups at the rear of your truck, likely with a hath and tailgate, how do you keep the weather off this area?

As part of my crusade for speedy food prep, I would like a slide-out kitchen setup. But my LC80's hatch does not provide sufficient protection for cooking in the rain. So something additional is required.

Thanks for your opinions and photos!

A.
 

Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
For a simple, cheap solution you can get a "pop up" canopy that goes up in about 2 minutes. Stake it to the ground in case of wind and you're good to go.
 

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carbon60

Explorer
Rear awning would work, for sure. It's a little slower to deploy and stow than I would like, but maybe I'm being too picky.

Thanks.
 

4x4junkie

Explorer
Canvas or plastic tarp and some spring clamps around the hatch works for me (also blocks some of the wind too, though i do have to hang weights from the bottom to reduce it blowing around if the wind is real strong).
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
See the links in my sig. Easy to make and stake a custom awning of your own construction. Erection is 5mins tops. If you think you'll be cooking your food faster than that, you're really weird.

My only other answer is 'get a vehicle with a Liftgate'. There isn't anything faster than that.
 

Switch

Observer
Those of you that have nicely integrated kitchen setups at the rear of your truck, likely with a hath and tailgate, how do you keep the weather off this area?

As part of my crusade for speedy food prep, I would like a slide-out kitchen setup. But my LC80's hatch does not provide sufficient protection for cooking in the rain. So something additional is required.

Thanks for your opinions and photos!

A.
I built a canopy using EMT conduit and a polyvinyl tarp.
This post mostly shows the side tarp. But the back tarp followed the same design.
http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/38439-Post-your-Camp-Awnings?p=1477393#post1477393
 

cerutti

Observer
Im running a Foxwing awning.



I also keep one extension piece that I can use to expand my prep area or block the wind.
 

carbon60

Explorer
Im running a Foxwing awning.
I think that is probably a great solution.

Still, I don't feel it for stopping on the roadside for coffee.

I also like the idea of a simple extension from the hatch itself, just to make it a tough longer, and maybe wrap down on the sides.
 

mapper

Explorer
A 1.25 meter awning worked great for my Disco.
I know this goes back a bit but....whoa...information on that bike rack setup??!! What is going on there?

Aside from trail dirt the main thing keeping from using a hitch rack like that is that I hate how it is in the way of rear access
 

Scoutn79

Adventurer
While this isn't elegant by any means it was made out of stuff laying around the shop so cost was low. The one thing I don't like about typical awnings is there is no side protection for cool breezes or rain coming down at an angle. I could flair out the sides more if I have something to tie the grommets to. Not pretty but functional. The cantilever design, used when I am by myself, is nice because there are no poles in the way and I can move the truck without having to deal with the awning. We use a larger tarp for the two trucks now so we get more side protection. Still a dedicated awning would be nice but I don't use a roof rack very often so there isn't always something to mount it to.
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Darrell
 

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acg

Adventurer
I know this goes back a bit but....whoa...information on that bike rack setup??!! What is going on there?

Aside from trail dirt the main thing keeping from using a hitch rack like that is that I hate how it is in the way of rear access
It is a Thule T2 with a hitch bar extension (to move it father back to allow the rear door to open). The Thule hitch is convenient, but only if I am not doing severe off-roading, i.e., impact on rear departure angle. The only reason why I do not use this all the time is the T2 hitch-mount rack offers better lock security options and is lower off the round, especially when hauling the family around for the leisure weekend bike rides.

I switch to a different rear tire mounted bike carrier set-up for severe off-roading trips (see pic), i.e., better departure angle and away from trail dirt.
 

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