Propane canister mount to outside of rear door?

Ceegee

New member
Of my two door racks, one is customized from a part for another van: http://herbiesworld.blogspot.com/2014/10/astrolander-update-rear-door-mounted.html
The other is scratch-built: https://herbiesworld.blogspot.com/2017/07/retro-post-astrolander-rear-door-rack.html

Both use the same basic idea of an "over-hinge" - a C-shaped assembly that fits over the existing door hinges. I drive out the original door pins (harder than it sounds), then put the new hinge over the existing hinges and put a longer pin of the same diameter through the whole mess. The rest of the rack is welded to the over-hinges. EDIT: Here's a photo of me checking the fit on the over-hinge after tacking it up.

View attachment 616088

The actual aluminum Propane and Jerry-can holders are from AT Overland: https://atoverland.com/
Thank you very much for the detailed post! =) What do you think about the effects on the tank in the event of a rear-end vehicle accident, in comparison with an accident when a tank is mounted underneath the van?
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
What do you think about the effects on the tank in the event of a rear-end vehicle accident, in comparison with an accident when a tank is mounted underneath the van?
I assume you mean my rear gasoline tank? Nothing is going to be as safe as a mid-ship mounted underbody OEM tank. Those things are tested to hell and back. If there was a factory (or aftermarket) underbody tank for my van, I'd probably look into that first. But there isn't, so I bring the jerry when I can reasonably presume that the extra 5gallons might be needed (longer distances or questionable fuel availability). I feel better about NATO steel cans and real Scepter MFCs than I would about a "consumer" grade can, but the reality is that if I get rear-ended by a big enough truck, a rupture is not out of possibility.

Regarding the rear propane tank, I'm trading off the risk of rear-end impact for the portable tank vs. damaging an underbody tank going over rocks, etc.

As with the gas jerry, weigh your own risks accordingly.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
I assume you mean my rear gasoline tank? Nothing is going to be as safe as a mid-ship mounted underbody OEM tank. Those things are tested to hell and back. If there was a factory (or aftermarket) underbody tank for my van, I'd probably look into that first. But there isn't, so I bring the jerry when I can reasonably presume that the extra 5gallons might be needed (longer distances or questionable fuel availability). I feel better about NATO steel cans and real Scepter MFCs than I would about a "consumer" grade can, but the reality is that if I get rear-ended by a big enough truck, a rupture is not out of possibility.

Regarding the rear propane tank, I'm trading off the risk of rear-end impact for the portable tank vs. damaging an underbody tank going over rocks, etc.

As with the gas jerry, weigh your own risks accordingly.
This reminds me of Ford Pintos.

 

Pntyrmvr

Adventurer
What is missing in this discussion has nothing to do with what rules may or may not apply in any given rear propane cylinder installation.

What is missing is the discussion of the instant abandonment of insurance coverage should an accident occur with a rear mounted tank. Right or wrong in their application of some set of rules the insurers have deeper pockets to fight dropping of coverage in a catastrophic event. They walk away leaving an individual to prove them wrong. At a serious expense.

Right and sued out of your home is still homeless.

Sometimes avoiding the urge to stand up for every damn principle one believes in and looking at the big picture is the way to be.

There is always someone with deeper pockets and a bigger engine.

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
 

quickfarms

Adventurer
A few days ago I was watching a manufacturer’s video that was attached to another thread on this site and they clearly show the propane tank mounted to the rear of the camper and talk about it as an option.

So if a manufacturer is currently doing it there must not be that much of an issue.

I also asked several of the local Leo’s about propane or fuel tanks on the back of a camper, Jeep or hitch carrier and they could not find any legal issue with it in CA or federal regulations for small quantities.

The regulations that they found related to quantities much larger than is being discussed here.
 

Mwilliamshs

Explorer
If you're letting a profiteer or a law enforcer decide what's responsible you're not long for this world.

A house built to code is the worst house you can legally sell.

The lowest bidder is the cheapest builder.

In other words, just because there's no law against it doesn't mean it's a good idea.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
The weak link on a propane tank is the hose. If you are concerned about a leak/explosion shut off the valve when driving. If you get hit hard enough to rupture the tank I think you have other concerns to worry about.
 

Mwilliamshs

Explorer
The weak link on a propane tank is the hose. If you are concerned about a leak/explosion shut off the valve when driving. If you get hit hard enough to rupture the tank I think you have other concerns to worry about.
Good idea in shutting the valve in transit.

A 16 oz hammer swung at 30 mph will break the brass valve in a steel propane tank. A 5,000 lb vehicle is at least as effective, don't you think? You don't have to be in a high speed collision to cause problems with a high pressure fuel leak.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
Good idea in shutting the valve in transit.

A 16 oz hammer swung at 30 mph will break the brass valve in a steel propane tank. A 5,000 lb vehicle is at least as effective, don't you think? You don't have to be in a high speed collision to cause problems with a high pressure fuel leak.
This is why I want a pure electric overlander, to eliminate all those explosive fossil fuels.
 

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