Probably the best steps I have ever seen

Geo.Lander

Well-known member
I have to say that style of step is an absolute deal breaker for me. They stick out way too far from the truck. You can't deploy them when parked on a street, they will block the sidewalk.
It takes a bit more work, but a two step well inside the vehicle means you only need one or at most two steps to deploy. It also is low enough to climb in and out without deploying the steps.
Beautiful workmanship design fail!
Design is based on interpretation of requirements. Your requirements differ from sitecs and probably most who don't want to or don't have the option (based on other design criteria) to add recessed steps to their box.
So don't bash his design that suits his requirements that are perfectly valid based on his use cases not your own. I feel a lot of things about mounting a tire on the front of vehicles. But show a bit of respect.
 

Joe917

Explorer
Design is based on interpretation of requirements. Your requirements differ from sitecs and probably most who don't want to or don't have the option (based on other design criteria) to add recessed steps to their box.
So don't bash his design that suits his requirements that are perfectly valid based on his use cases not your own. I feel a lot of things about mounting a tire on the front of vehicles. But show a bit of respect.
Do not put words into my mouth.
The thread is about the long folding steps Neil pictured.
 

Sitec

Adventurer
Guys it's all good, no offence taken. It's good to have the discussion... I looked into having more steps inside, but it'd be a hole we'd be guaranteed to find and fall into in the dark! I also have air tanks just under the step well we have, and pretty well all remaining chassis space is used up in storage/tanks etc. :) Re steps out on sidewalks etc, we don't plan on being in too many cities with the truck, but if in the rare event we are, the steps fold in half leaving approx 450mm sticking out. The steps was something I pondered for quite a while before building them. We'd already worked out there was no way we were carting a ladder around that had to clip to the truck. We wanted something that was as easy to use as stairs in a house, and we decided that the few times our steps would be in the way or restrict where we can park would be so few compared to how many times we'd be getting in and out of the truck. I looked at various sets of 'off the shelf' folding steps and have seen a few that have done a few years. With lots of hinges, they have wearing parts and will over time sag. We are happy with our relatively simple setup as it meets our needs. :)
 
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RoamIt

Active member
Well, it is a bit tongue in cheek ;) But repairing an electric motor like this is not a thing, it's a replace. Actually looks like a winch operated contraption.
 

Iain_U1250

Explorer
One of the big design decisions was when I decided to lower the floor at the door to minimise the height the steps, and the two automatic steps fold out. Whilst it does take up floor space, we use the drop section as a shower, and out "wet room" for muddy and sandy feet.

The steps are are pretty agricultural by comparison to the stainless steps. There are no bearings, just bolts which I put some lithium grease on now and again. The linear actuator is a decent bit of kit, IP67 rated and good for 100,000 cycles, so using it twice a day, it will last for 130 years :) They are over centre locked - so are pretty solid, both up and down, which is important to stop rattles and that is what would wear out the bolts, cycling a couple of times a day with metal on metal is not the problem. It took me a long time to figure out the best way for us, as with all things on a truck, everything is a compromise. I looked at a lot of options, but we needed automatic steps as we can carry passengers in the rear, and had the grey water tank under the drop floor for the shower, so I came up with this idea . It is similar to the OEM Unimog radio box style, but without the complicated pneumatics and springs.

The important thing for me was to have something to hold onto. There are two handles, solidly attached to give you something to grab onto. You can have both hands grabbing the handles before you even put a foot on the steps, something that some of the concertina ones can't do, as they are too far away until you get to the last coupe of steps. I carry things up and down the steps sometimes, but it is easier to just put them down onto the floor, climb down and then pick them up again. I think it is better to think of them as a ladder, not stairs. I don't expect to be able to walk down them like a house. You can also see the top stair when you are in the standing camper, so you don't try step off when the stairs are up, and can see where to put your feet.

The steps are the same height as the cab steps, and the same spacing and size, so we get used to doing the same motion. Getting into the cab is a lot harder than the camper. I've fallen out the cab when I missed a step, but not out the camper. I looked at a lot of commercial options, went to all the caravan and camping shows, but none of those we tested felt as stable as ours. They do rock the truck a bit, enough so that when I am on the roof, I tell Trish to warn me if she wants to climb down the stairs.

This is how mine work, and Trish demonstrates how easy it is to get in and out. She always climbs out backward like that, whilst I walk down forwards, using only the big long handle on the door.


If anyone want more photos or measurement, let me know.
 

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