Power Wagon In Europe?

Doc Fluty

New member
Attached is a picture of the carpark at the gate of the naples naval base.
The picture you are posting is from outside the base. And I found a few images from full-size trucks and even vans on base. So it can be done.



I have talked to a few people around the web since posting this and I actually feel more confident in taking the PW over there. One person I respect who drives a Defender 130 to many of the places I want to go has said he often parks outside a city if he wants to go into a metropolitan area in Europe and takes a taxi or uber into the city centers. He said this is actually better because he doesn't have to search and pay for parking. He said that once I get out of western Europe the size won't matter much.

I think I am going ahead with the plan to take a full size with me when we get stationed over there... I will update this site regularly with how good or bad that decision ends up being lol

I have thought about a Defender 110... but am just so unsure about the 4x4 system (center locker but no axle locks?), engine options and comfort compared to a new PW

the worst-case scenario is I only drive it a few times to eastern Europe, northern Africa and only a few other places the 3 years I'm over there... I still get to bring it back with me and enjoy it here. If I only get to drive it once every 6 months or so then it won't be such a big deal... but it will be fun in the desert of Morroco!
 
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slvyj

Observer
I am currently in Stuttgart, Germany. Brought over my modified 2012 JKUR, while I love it, the Jeep is not perfect for Europe. The biggest issue is the price of fuel. Inside Germany, I get discounted gas but once I leave Germany I have to buy on the economy. I have spent in one refueling over 100 euros filling up my fuel tank, its not fun. In Italy, you will have it the same, discount fuel but once you leave the country be prepared. I have the AEV fuel caddy, and I use it when I leave Germany and I'm trying to figure out how to carry more. You can buy real NATO metal fuel cans here for under 20 euros, I got four and trying to figure out how to carry on my roof rack. Some of my friends have gotten stopped at the borders when carrying extra fuel and had to pay an import tax.

On the economy diesel is cheaper then petrol, but a lot of European countries are banning diesel so something to think about.

Last year I drove my Jeep to Rome, rented an apartment outside the city, parked the Jeep and took the public transit to the city center. With fuel cost, would have been cheaper to fly but the drive was fun.

I have friends who are or have been station in Naples, and they have never advised taking a new vehicle to Naples, it will get banged or scratched up, just a fact of life in Naples.

While there be on the lookout for either a Landcruiser or Defender, Italy is a good source for they are rust free. Most in Germany by the 25 year mark are nothing but rust. Other thing is you can get stuff in Europe that might not be available in the States. I see a lot of South African off road equipment available here that you don't find in the States. I'm currently in the process of buying a South African trailer that is not sold in the States. For a truck, you can get the metal canopies or campers.

I believe you can catch a car ferry to Tunisia, co-worker got assigned to there after Stuttgart. Drove down through Italy and caught a car ferry to ship his car, all part of his PCS. Suppose to be some really good overland routes in Tunisia.
 
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billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
I still get to bring it back with me and enjoy it here. If I only get to drive it once every 6 months or so then it won't be such a big deal...
are you paying shipping or ?
I think it could be cool showing up in a big American truck but I doubt it will be practical or the best use of money. You are in Europe, live the European experience, why muddy the waters with something from home?
 

vintageracer

To Infinity and Beyond!
[QUOTE="billiebob, post: 2720929 You are in Europe, live the European experience, why muddy the waters with something from home?[/QUOTE]

Why Muddy the waters in another part of the world?

Cause that what Americans love to do!
 

LocoCoyote

World Citizen
Next spring my family will be moved by the US Military to Italy for about 3 years or so. In that time I would like to explore the western alps and generally fun places to go. I have a 2017 Ram Rebel now but have been wanting to upgrade to the 2020 Ram Powerwagon. So, gas cost not withstanding... would bringing the PW over be a bad idea?

I understand the limits of city driving and parking so I might buy something small and local just for around town daily driving and keep the PW strictly as an adventure rig... also the mass transit I hear is nice so that helps to keep the PW parked unless I want to have fun.

I hate the idea of buying something new over there and taking the loss when it's time to move back and selling it... and I also don't want anything used because of reliability issues, no winch, ect... also, a power wagon would give me the peace of mind that I wont get stuck in a ditch in a country where I dont speak the language. Plus I can keep the PW for when I get back stateside and continue my journeys in north america.

I thought about putting 35s on it and have read that I will need M+S tire or full blown snow tires in Germany... I dunno... is there anything you would think of that I should consider before I make this massive purchase?

::: I should have mentioned another main reason I wanted the PW over other options is I need to fit a family of six :::

Thank you in advance!
If you are planning on hitting the old military roads in the Alps, you are going to want something smaller. The turns on the switchbacks are tight enough for a normal sized truck... plus there are many trails that are just too narrow for a bigger rig. And the final nail in the big rig coffin is tight, small tunnels.

with that all said, if/when you are ready to hit those trails, hit me up. Either we can travel together, or I can give you some great tips and routes.
 

erstwild

Active member
Why not just pick up an ex-Nato G Wagon and either sell it before you come back stateside or if it is registerable in your home state, import it?

 

Lovetheworld

Active member
The Us trucks are not only big on most streets and parking places, they can also be quite big when offroading. Especially in the mountains.

And there are many 4x4 options available in Europe, so why spend all that money to bring a car over here? Perhaps just buy an older petrol Landcruiser, as they will not have crazy miles and are comfortabel, and the size is good. You also have them as 7 seaters.
And it can be services in Morocco if you have an issue. Your Dodge will be hopeless in servicing in Morocco or Balkan.
 

yoggie

Member
I hope this is not too late, but as someone who has been stationed in Germany and travelled around Italy, you will come to hate your PowerWagon if you bring one over. I had a 2 door Wrangler, usually considered a small car in the US, with a mild lift and 35s. In a normal parking spot in the US, I have at least 6 inches on either side. In Germany, I would stick outside of the lines at least an inch on both sides. The roads are so narrow and I was so wide that there were several incidents where I barely fit between the curb and oncoming traffic (note, German roads are at least 2-3 feet wider than Italian roads). I will always remember one time when I thought I was going to have an offset head on collision with a Mercedes prototype. Seriously, that car that I came within an inch of destroying was sitting on a car show podium in Geneva two weeks later. I cannot imagine what was going through the head of the test driver when he almost destroyed a priceless prototype that would have ruined the car's reveal. I had a curb on my side, he had one on his side, and with a blind corner and high speeds it would have been a disaster. It got to the point that I would become seriously anxious whenever I had to drive the jeep. I took my jeep to several off-road parks in Germany and France, and almost without fail I was one of the widest cars there, meaning I had a seriously hard time fitting on the trails. Be ready to destroy your roof by hitting branches. Your PowerWagon will be at least a foot if not two wider; you will not fit on the trails. It's not just that you will have a bit of a hard time parking it. You latterly will not be able to drive it on the side roads in Italy for fear of killing the other drivers. Having driven in the side roads in Italy, they are not designed to allow two cars to pass at speed, one is expected to come to a stop and pull all the way over to let the other car pass. These are with very small Fiat 500s, your truck will take up the entire lane and once you almost crash head on going around blind corners with oncoming traffic barreling down the road at full speed, you will no kidding resent buying that truck.
 

Heading Out

Adventurer
What's the saying..... Oh ya, When in Rome.....

Having spent many summers in Europe and Driven all over, Personally I wouldn't do it. nothing adds up,
it will be like driving a dump truck everywhere here in the US, can you do it, yes, but why?

Buy a car from someone getting shipped out, and sell it to someone coming in when you leave. buy a PW when you return.
but then again are you sure you'll get posted in the US next?

But it sounds like you've already made up your mind.
 

Highlander

The Good Shepherd
I was chatting with a guy in Italy who is a hunters and spends much of his time in norther Italy chasing the woodcock and grouse in the Alps.
He drives an awd Panda. I jokingly asked him would it not be better for him to get a pickup truck since he has got 4 dogs and so much gear to carry... and his response was that in the most areas in northern Italy Fiat is the only car one can drive. Even a Ford Ranger or Toyota HLX would be hard to drive in the mountain areas. This could be the case for half of the EU.
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
I was chatting with a guy in Italy who is a hunters and spends much of his time in norther Italy chasing the woodcock and grouse in the Alps.
He drives an awd Panda. I jokingly asked him would it not be better for him to get a pickup truck since he has got 4 dogs and so much gear to carry... and his response was that in the most areas in northern Italy Fiat is the only car one can drive. Even a Ford Ranger or Toyota HLX would be hard to drive in the mountain areas. This could be the case for half of the EU.
Funny enough I had a Panda in Spain at first I thought it would suck. But even a VW golf couldn’t go half the places I took the Panda. However I think he has kids which case Unless he puts a trailer behind the Panda its not going to work for him.
 

Highlander

The Good Shepherd
Funny enough I had a Panda in Spain at first I thought it would suck. But even a VW golf couldn’t go half the places I took the Panda. However I think he has kids which case Unless he puts a trailer behind the Panda its not going to work for him
Yeah, I have not set in the Panda, though I have seen some videos and sure it does seem a fun car to drive. That dude has the back sits folded to put his dogs and gears in the car.
But I guess if one has kids the Panda is not the option. There must be some other options over there.
 

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