Power Chip?

MJCake1

DiamondBackMatt
Has anyone done a power chip mod on these rigs?
I have a 2015 FGB72s and at times it hasn't enough power to climb rough hills slowly. It will just come to a stop and then the tranny light will come on so I have to roll back and get a head of steam up to make the grade.
I have 75 gal. Water, 55 gal. Fuel, 35 gal. Gray. Usually 15-16k lbs loaded.
Anyone else feel under powered?
 

SkiFreak

Expedition Leader
Steinbauer offers modules for Fuso trucks here in Australia, but as far as I know, these are not normally available elsewhere.
Previously, I have helped organize acquisition of a module for a Canadian member who owned a FG140, as it was the same motor as our FG84. All reports were that it worked without any issues.
 

MJCake1

DiamondBackMatt
Steinbauer offers modules for Fuso trucks here in Australia, but as far as I know, these are not normally available elsewhere.
Previously, I have helped organize acquisition of a module for a Canadian member who owned a FG140, as it was the same motor as our FG84. All reports were that it worked without any issues.
Thanks Ski,
I will look them up. What engine is the 140/84?
 

DzlToy

Explorer
A 16,000 pound truck, ascending mountain passes, is going to be slow when powered by a, "de-tuned to run for 500,000 miles" four cylinder diesel. If you want mega power, get a USDM pickup and throw a tune on it. Five hundred HP and 1000 foot pounds are quite easily achievable.

A Steinbauer chip for an Isuzu NPR is estimated to provide a map for 260 HP and 560 foot pounds, an improvement, sure, but not a powerhouse for pulling long steep grades in a heavy truck.

Lose some weight, get used to going slowly (better MPG, easier on the truck and keeps you off the freeways), do an engine swap, get a different truck, or spend $2,000 on an ECU that gets you a bit more power, but not a lot of bang for the buck IMHO.

By my calculations, a 16,000 pound truck would need about 500 HP to feel spirited, which is not what these trucks are about. They are city delivery vehicles, not continent killing Grand Touring cars.

For technical off road work, you actually need lower gearing. Fuso made a HUGE mistake not including a low range on these trucks. I don't care how good the DCT is or what diff ratio you have, there is no substitute for super low gearing off road. It makes the truck more controllable, gives you more time to react, reduces stress on the truck and the trail and keeps wheel speed down, which has a tendency to unsettle a truck, dig holes or send rocks flying.
 

SkiFreak

Expedition Leader
Fuso made a HUGE mistake not including a low range on these trucks.
Well, that's in the US market.
Here in Australia all FG's come with a 5 speed manual and have a low range transfer case (with the exception of the early FGB71).
From everything I have read and heard, that is a much better setup for these trucks, but as you have said, they are definitely not speedsters on the highway.
 

DzlToy

Explorer
OP is in Nevada, USA and mentions climbing hills, "slowly", which cannot be done in 4WD HIGH.

AUS Hino 300 = 65:1 low range - - - - - - - - - AUS NPS = 50:1 low range
USDM FG = 26:1, no low range - - - - - - - - - AUS FG = 52:1 low range
USDM FJ60 = 40:1 low range - - - - - - - - - - - USDM 1985 Toyota 4Runner = 47:1 (w/ 5.29 diff)
Jeep JL Unlimited Rubicon = 84:1 low range

Hopefully you see the pattern if off road driving is your concern and if so, I would consider adding a divorced third party transfer case. If the concern relates to highway driving or narrow country roads over mountain passes, for example, a chip will help, but it's not a silver bullet.

One of the advantages of a relatively large diesel engine is torque. Typically, they are significantly lower in HP than the equivalent torque number (foot pounds or Nm). Thankfully, this is what you need to haul heavy loads and crawl along difficult terrain off road, in mud, soft sand, etc. Yes, I know huge HP will get you through sand/mud but you don't have that option in these trucks. Horsepower is work over time and it takes a lot of HP to haul a heavy load up a steep grade, quickly. As seen above, torque multiplication via a transfer case, gives you more control, longer reaction time, takes stress off your transmission and allows you to slow down to manoeuver over obstacles or rough terrain.

Maybe some of the Aussies can put you (OP) in touch with a tuner there to discuss your options. While Fuso trucks are pretty stout, 16k is a fair amount of weight. Adding 50-75 HP may or may not be a good idea, when the rest of the driveline is considered. With the troubles in the USDM over the DCT transmission, I would not add an ounce of power and would instead be considering a 5 speed conversion with a Brownie box, 2 speed rear end, low range transfer case and/or any other option that would make my truck more usable for whatever I intend to use it for. Hopefully, that will give you some ideas for solving your problem.
 

Karl of Oz

Observer
I have an FGB-71 (Australian) that was fitted from new with a DP Chip from Berrima Diesel. It worked well, increased power and torque but I don't know how much by. I would guess maybe 130 kw and torque went from 370 up a bit, may 430 ~440 Nm?. Anyway it was better. Truck weighed around 6500kg +/- or maybe a little more on occasion (its legal maximum was 6500 kg). After about a year of this I decided to get a re-map. I remain convinced that this is better as it is a more holistic approach to engine changes. The guy that did it actually reduced fuel rail pressure from that applied by the chip 9which he removed). he did what he considered "conservative" and told me power was probably around 140 kw, but torque up to abut 490 Nm. He said another 10% would be no problem if I wanted it but I am playing it safe and leaving it where it is.
The difference? It was a little "softer" (doeyer?) than the chip but much smoother power/torque delivery through the range. He can adjust where this delivery suits best. As an example, on my daily commute I have a big hill to climb. If I go pretty flat out at the bottom of the previous hill (when no cops were around) it used to reduce in speed from about 100 km/h to about 60 up the hill. After the re-map it never drops below 70 km/h and I don't have to go flat out beforehand to keep that.
Overall it has made it much better to drive. Yes its no powerhouse but as others have already stated, it was never meant to be.
Oh, and I also got my GVM upgraded to 6,720 kg thanks to some previous testing done by All Terrain Warriors and my local engineer. This matched my maximum weight so now I will always be "legal".
There was nothing wrong with the chip (the supplier claims it is a conservative one and has a guarantee that recons it will never harm your engine), I just believe a remap is better for your engine. If anyone wants to buy my chip (plug and play) happy to sell it at <1/2 price.
 

SkiFreak

Expedition Leader
Increased rail pressure = increased stress and wear. It's just basic physics, and that will never change, no matter what any chip manufacturer may claim.
I chose a Steinbauer because it works differently to most, in that it only changes the main injector pulse, not the rail pressure or other injector pulses.
On common rail engines there can be up to 5 injection pulses; pre, main and post. These help quiet the engine and reduce emissions (so they say). That is another issue with chips that change rail pressure, in that they increase fuel delivery for each and every pulse, which is definitely not ideal.
As for a remap... I too was convinced that this should be better than any post ECU chip, but after some discussions with a mechanic friend of mine the other week, who used to do remaps, I am no longer as convinced as I was.
The remap itself is probably better, in that it can utilize the safety features of the ECU, but from what I was told, the remap can affect the ability of any dealership to be able to fault find future engine problems. A remap also negates any warranty, whereas a chip normally does not.
Each to their own, but forewarned is forearmed.
 

chocko

New member
I have an FGB-71 (Australian) that was fitted from new with a DP Chip from Berrima Diesel. It worked well, increased power and torque but I don't know how much by. I would guess maybe 130 kw and torque went from 370 up a bit, may 430 ~440 Nm?. Anyway it was better. Truck weighed around 6500kg +/- or maybe a little more on occasion (its legal maximum was 6500 kg). After about a year of this I decided to get a re-map. I remain convinced that this is better as it is a more holistic approach to engine changes. The guy that did it actually reduced fuel rail pressure from that applied by the chip 9which he removed). he did what he considered "conservative" and told me power was probably around 140 kw, but torque up to abut 490 Nm. He said another 10% would be no problem if I wanted it but I am playing it safe and leaving it where it is.
The difference? It was a little "softer" (doeyer?) than the chip but much smoother power/torque delivery through the range. He can adjust where this delivery suits best. As an example, on my daily commute I have a big hill to climb. If I go pretty flat out at the bottom of the previous hill (when no cops were around) it used to reduce in speed from about 100 km/h to about 60 up the hill. After the re-map it never drops below 70 km/h and I don't have to go flat out beforehand to keep that.
Overall it has made it much better to drive. Yes its no powerhouse but as others have already stated, it was never meant to be.
Oh, and I also got my GVM upgraded to 6,720 kg thanks to some previous testing done by All Terrain Warriors and my local engineer. This matched my maximum weight so now I will always be "legal".
There was nothing wrong with the chip (the supplier claims it is a conservative one and has a guarantee that recons it will never harm your engine), I just believe a remap is better for your engine. If anyone wants to buy my chip (plug and play) happy to sell it at <1/2 price.
Hi Karl
Just wondering if you have sold you chip yet
Cheers chocko
 
I have never owned a Fuso but I have owned many 4wds over the last 50 years from Landcruisers to a U500.
I strongly agree with the comments re increasing low gears. First thought is adding an Atlas 4 spd TC.
 
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