Post your favorite classic cool rig that is now worth too much to enjoy?

#3
They are still out there but I think they cost a bit more but there are companies that will remake an older one for you, get out your checkbook.
 

Correus

Adventurer
#4
Yes - a professionally rebuilt one will cost you anywhere from about $60K - $200K. Once in a you will find a fully restored one for less than $50K. Toss in the fact that the one pictured in the OP is not a common one the asking price is really good.

The question is - why would you want to buy one that has been fully restored, especially at those prices? Why not just purchase one from a reputable dealer or private individual? You can checkout the pricing on eBay to give you a general idea. Better yet, just Google something like "Land Rover SIIa for sale".

They are easy to work on and parts are not hard to get.

I'm an idiot when it comes to auto mechanics and even I'm almost done with a complete chassis off refurbishment. I've done all of the work myself with very, very little physical help. I have gotten tons of help as in advice, tips-n-tricks, and opinions; the Landy community is more than willing to help out! The only physical help I've had so far is pressing distance pieces and races before I bought a shop press; sandblasting parts for painting; having the body panels professionally painted; and moving parts that are too awkward to move by oneself. I will be getting help in installing a new electrical harness and the rest of the electronics, my father-in-law is going to help do it.

Other than what I said above I've done all the work myself. I've rebuilt all three gearboxes that make up the tranny, rebuilt the brake system; rebuilt the drive train, suspension, hubs, steering system and so on.

If someone like me can do it anyone can. There are many out there for sale that don't require a lot of work and there are some that do. Mine didn't require all of the work I've done, yet it will go a long ways in regard to use and longevity.

Still...they aren't cheap. The more "quintessential" ones, like mine - a '63 SIIa 88 Station Wagon with Tropical Top, are going up in price. The older they are the more expensive they can get. The Defenders ALL tend to be pricey.

I got mine for $5,500 13 years ago; today if I were to buy it, in the same condition it was in when I got it, it would go for about $10K. So far I've invested about $8K in parts, not counting the cost of sandblasting and painting. The painting alone cost just a bit more than I paid for the rig.

I chose the route I took so that I could do the work myself and make the Landy my own. I also did it so I would learn to work on it myself.

Something else about buying a fully restored one vs one that isn't...the community tends to hold those who buy fully restored in less esteem, less respect than those who don't. Same goes for vintage Jeeps, Land Cruiers and so on. Most of the members of these communities are too polite to say it though. More than likely a person who shows up at an event in a rig they purchased fully restored will get a "bless your heart"; the rig though will be admired. Those who did the work will be admired, the owner who didn't lift a finger other than to sign the check won't be.

HOWEVER - the community doesn't look down on those who do as much work as they can towards a full restoration while letting professionals do large chunks of it. It's those who don't lift a finger to do the work, they just want the "lifestyle".

Recently two individuals joined the vintage Rover world, both bought rigs that were fully restored by professionals. One couldn't even take the time to find his Rover, he paid someone to do that even. While the Landy community is cordial to this guy they absolutely despise the other. This other guy bought a Rover and paid to have it restored. He also had it modified to the point that it is now has the nickname "douche wagon".

So, yes, the cool rigs are still out there, lots of them are. Yet it's up to the buyer to decide whether he wants to take the easy way or the more difficult way.
 
#8
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$2500 a month or two ago, everything important is there and operational. Not 1000% rust free but it's minimal and not cancerous. It's not a daily driver but it's not a project either, to keep it on the road you need to know how to turn wrenches or have a deep wallet but that's half the fun. A Series/Defender has a certain cost of entry in North America especially but that's life. It's not like a vintage Toyota or Jeep is any cheaper and they both have a much higher cost of entry for a cool old rig(even a YJ or 2nd gen 4Runner) than we do for an RRC or D1/2 or P38 so let's just count our blessings.
 
#9
One couldn't even take the time to find his Rover, he paid someone to do that even. While the Landy community is cordial to this guy they absolutely despise the other. This other guy bought a Rover and paid to have it restored. He also had it modified to the point that it is now has the nickname "douche wagon".

Personally, I've always felt the "built, not bought" sentiment off-putting and, well to put to use the language of apparently very-judgey Rover owners- douchey. I didn't grow up in a world where tools mattered. My Dad was very blue collar, working the night shift in a warehouse, but he wasn't mechanically inclined, neither am I. I tried, I took shop class, I even bought a CJ7. I spent entirely too many nights after work cutting my fingers on dirty rusted out parts...never again! I work hard all day and have obtained the kind of income that I can pay people who actually know what they are doing and have all of the expensive tools and most of all TIME to do all of this for me. I spend my time using the vehicle for what I bought it for and I love it. I've tried the other way....quite frankly it was terrible.
 

Red90

Adventurer
#10
So you complain about one group being judgemental by judging them? How about just letting people do what suits them and worry about your own life.
 
#11
I always thought assigning gender & names to vehicles a bit odd. anyway . . .
from here: https://truckcamperhq.com/category/readers-rigs
For me, naming my vehicles, guns, aircraft, etc. I flew in came from military heritage and tradition. Obviously it came from the Great World War, or World War I and then II (Depending on what side of the pond you are on) where the tradition was to bring good fortune and health to the equipment that carried those chaps through the days.......Can't say that's why it stuck around for so many others but I think that is really where the naming of vehicles came from.....historically that is! My two decades and some change of serving carried on that tradition and I do the same for my personal vehicles! Anywho, of course that is just the history behind it as I know it and its all personal preference I believe on why people do it.

Not sure I would feel okay with D-wagon though! hahahahaha

On that note, that is a beautiful overland camper set up........
 
#12
I simply thought this thread might be a place where folks could check and find nice, vintage, vehicles. had I known it would have turned into another pissing match about the "correct" way to enjoy your hobby, I might have posted a different picture.

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#13
Old 4x4s are now worth money. No one wants to go put a dent in the fender of their vehicle that has appreciated +$30k in the last few years.

Heck I know rover guys who are selling their NAS Defenders because they aren't comfortable using them off road. They are all getting grey market trucks. Heck even those are demanding a solid price these days. A pristine import 90, LHD, TDI engine, no rust, is $30k now. 110s are going up. You can find a deal as long as you don't mind working on it. 130 prices...WTF mate. Also older RRCs...sorry but not paying 5 figures for a RRC. Especially when you see a huge puddle of power steering fluid in the advert pics.

The old 4x4 market has shifted from enthusiasts to guys who have $40k to spend on a "cool vintage truck" for their mountain house. I know this...because I've spoken to a few of them. They expect it to work...which isn't a reasonable expectation for a worn out classic. So you go to the other end of the spectrum for a fully reconditioned vehicle. Built better than when it was new.

Overall, the world has gone crazy for old 4x4s.
 
#14
I simply thought this thread might be a place where folks could check and find nice, vintage, vehicles. had I known it would have turned into another pissing match about the "correct" way to enjoy your hobby, I might have posted a different picture.

View attachment 477012

View attachment 477013
I'm about this! The title made it sound like another thread bemoaning how classic rigs are getting pricey. Like below.

Old 4x4s are now worth money. No one wants to go put a dent in the fender of their vehicle that has appreciated +$30k in the last few years.

Heck I know rover guys who are selling their NAS Defenders because they aren't comfortable using them off road. They are all getting grey market trucks. Heck even those are demanding a solid price these days. A pristine import 90, LHD, TDI engine, no rust, is $30k now. 110s are going up. You can find a deal as long as you don't mind working on it. 130 prices...WTF mate. Also older RRCs...sorry but not paying 5 figures for a RRC. Especially when you see a huge puddle of power steering fluid in the advert pics.

The old 4x4 market has shifted from enthusiasts to guys who have $40k to spend on a "cool vintage truck" for their mountain house. I know this...because I've spoken to a few of them. They expect it to work...which isn't a reasonable expectation for a worn out classic. So you go to the other end of the spectrum for a fully reconditioned vehicle. Built better than when it was new.

Overall, the world has gone crazy for old 4x4s.
Did you read any of the discussion on the thread or just the title? The spread on RRCs is absurd so if you don't need to have a perfect one you can pick them up all day in 4-figure territory. D1s, D2s and P38s are even cheaper. Defenders have always commanded a premium in North America because we only got them for a few years and in limited numbers. If you're on a budget you've got options and who wouldn't want a Series or Defender that's been fully reconditioned by people who know what they're doing if they had the money?

Here's a pretty old truck to get us back on topic. It cost me a small amount of money and I pay for it with my time. Some people spend a lot of time working and pay more money instead for a pretty old truck, nothing wrong with that.

Rover1.jpg
 
#15
I miss my MOG and would love to have that blue one. Two of my old vehicles are hopefully still on the road. One is in North Dakota on an Alpaca farm and the last I saw of the other one it was in Big Bear in CA. I worked on both of them (Mog and Pinzgauer) for years and it was sure cheaper than therapy but I didn't know people that did that kind of restoration and anyway, I could have not owned (afforded) them if I wanted them pretty and in showroom condition.
They were for the trail and were great for that. I did learn a lot working on those things but still it is very time consuming and touches the wallet some. Worth it.
 
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