Post up your drawer/storage system

XPLRMOR

Member
looks like your workshop has some history.
Yes it does! the shop is in my basement. The house was built in 1897 by a Local lumber baron and owned by the same family since it was built, till I bought it 16 years ago. I have a ton of documentation about the build. A lot of stuff was left behind in the basement and attic, some of it dating back to 1850's. Someday I need to go through the stuff, but like the others here before me life gets in the way.
 

alia176

Explorer
Just curious about weights savings so pardon the newb question! I'm noticing some builds here that are using either ALUM extrusions or ALUM square tubing then "skinning" with plywood material. Obviously the drawers need all sides but is it necessary to skin the sides too, other than purely for aesthetics? I'm trying to save on weight and was tossing around the idea of not skinning the sides or the bottom if I go with ALUM or 16g steel (angle or square tubing).
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Just curious about weights savings so pardon the newb question! I'm noticing some builds here that are using either ALUM extrusions or ALUM square tubing then "skinning" with plywood material. Obviously the drawers need all sides but is it necessary to skin the sides too, other than purely for aesthetics? I'm trying to save on weight and was tossing around the idea of not skinning the sides or the bottom if I go with ALUM or 16g steel (angle or square tubing).
You only need facing on a side if you need to prevent things from going past that plane. (i.e. if you plan to pack a back next to the drawers and don't want it to get squished in between the tubing, etc.) If your setup will work with all open frames, then go crazy. If your drawers are full-width to your vehicle, then open-sides make a lot of sense. If you can mount the frame to the vehicle without a hard bottom (mounting tabs, turnbuckles, etc.), then a bottom would be wasted material.

I actually have a spreadsheet where I modeled the difference in weight between constructing my fridge cabinet out of 1/2" baltic birch ply versus 1" aluminum tubing skinned with RevolutionPly (like lauan). There's potential to save weight, for sure (though in my case probably not enough weight to justify the hassle of building the cabinet a second time and introducing a number of construction challenges)
 

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Land Shark

New member
A while back I started looking to better organize the cargo area of my 3rd Gen to make getting ready for camping trips a little easier. I spent a lot of time combing thru forums to get ideas, but having some cabinetry background I wasn't a total fan of an all wood build. After doing some research on different materials I landed on Aluminum Extrusions and set out to design a drawer system for my 3rd Gen 4Runner. I wanted it to be as light as possible, be able to hold several hundred pounds and be configurable (to a degree).

So I dusted off my CAD skills and went to work. But a funny thing happened as the months ticked by I realized I was designing something that took minimal tools to assemble, didn't require an advanced skillset to construct and was sort of modular with a lot of possibilities for adding additional features (ie, sleeping platform, anchor systems, etc). With the help of a buddy and his CNC Machine I came up with this DIY Kit for the 3rd Gen 4Runner.



















Super clean man!!!
 
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