Post up your drawer/storage system

eatSleepWoof

Explorer
Pics of progress so far.
Just had a bit of a test fit to make sure all the brackets and tie downs etc are in the right place.
Still a bit to do yet because it’ll be covered in carpet yet, drawer fronts to and still the side wings and bed extension section to add.

When I go off road I can be on some awkward angles; let’s say about 30 degrees side tilt. The fridge will be sat on carpet but it can still move sideways a little bit on the wood as it is now.
Should I add a small upright piece or aluminium angle or something to hold it in place/stop it sliding too much?
Or should I just move the footman loops wider?
Or will it more than likely be fine once it’s on carpet?
Or are there some grippy feet that I can stick to the bottom of the fridge to get it to cling onto the carpet better?
I’m not looking for too expensive of a solution like a fridge tray. I don’t have welding facilities to Male my own either.
I’m not sure if a wide U bolt would do although not sure how much strain that might put on the plywood if it’s got the weight acting on it for too long. It’s 18mm birch plywood top if that makes any difference.
I've never had good luck with cam-buckle straps. Ratchet-strap the fridge and it won't be moving anywhere, even if you're upside down!
 

amnesia7

New member
try roller cam- very solid hold down - not your average cam buckle at all. Been tested and written about on overland journal
I’m in England and rollercam looks to be an American seller.

I've never had good luck with cam-buckle straps. Ratchet-strap the fridge and it won't be moving anywhere, even if you're upside down!
The reason I got cam buckles rather than ratchet straps is because it looked like that’s what the Engel tie down kit looked to be using.
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

The Total Approach of Getting Unstuck Off Road: 4WD Self-...
by Robert Wohlers
From $59.95
Tortillas to Totems (Every day an Adventure Book 4)
by Sam Manicom
From $9.99
Road Fever (Vintage Departures)
by Tim Cahill
From $6.99
Motorcycle Messengers: Tales from the Road by Writers who...
by Lois Pryce, Mark Richardson, Carla King, Sam Manic...
From $9.99
Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
by Laurence Gonzales
From $9.99

rayra

Expedition Leader
btw, the paddle latches with no strike plate, residential door knob strike / latch plates are a pretty good fit. IIRC I just had to dremel or file out the inner corners of the D-shaped hole when I did my drawers.
 

amnesia7

New member
btw, the paddle latches with no strike plate, residential door knob strike / latch plates are a pretty good fit. IIRC I just had to dremel or file out the inner corners of the D-shaped hole when I did my drawers.
i got some corner braces just before the lockdown kicked in here shutting all the shops and I’ve cut a couple down one side to leave about 7mm for the latch to hit against which I hope that should be alright. I couldn’t make that side any bigger because of the screw holes that were in that side of the corner brace.
 

Attachments

rayra

Expedition Leader
i got some corner braces just before the lockdown kicked in here shutting all the shops and I’ve cut a couple down one side to leave about 7mm for the latch to hit against which I hope that should be alright. I couldn’t make that side any bigger because of the screw holes that were in that side of the corner brace.
That's a good solution for drawer retention, as long as the metal is stout enough. I bought locking paddles as I wanted to sometimes transport some firearms in the drawers and I wanted to make sure that they'd stay reasonably locked shut, for legal purposes. Wouldn't really stop a determined thief, but enough to satisfy law enforcement / courts.
 

tdferrero

Active member
Finished up my drawer for the back of my Land Cruiser last night, realized I didn't take into account the thickness of the sliders I bought. :ROFLMAO: Oops... Ended up using some felt feet, the kind used on the bottom of heavy furniture to slide around the house to prevent scratches. Loaded the drawer up with about 200 pounds worth of stuff, and was very pleased with how easily it still slid. Surprised I haven't seen anyone else do something like this.
 

Outsane

New member
I prefer my drawers without rails, saves space and complexity.

I went with out the felt and just waxed the wood. There is also a vendor in Australia that uses Teflon strips, if you ever need a slicker surface.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

amnesia7

New member
Drawers and slide shelf now in place. I’m still on the test assembly at the moment using screws so still needs to be pulled apart, painted and glued+screwed back together.

It’s birch plywood and going in an old Land Rover so could be susceptible to damp. I’m going to be carpeting the outside of the box and the drawer fronts and the rest (inside the box, the slide-out shelf, and the drawers themselves) will just be painted with Bedec multi surface inside/outside paint.

Am I right in thinking that I should paint the areas that will be covered by carpet with the same paint so that they are protected just to be safe from any damp that might get into the carpet?
 

Attachments

yeos

Observer
I built this storage / sleeping unit over the past couple of days. I like the idea of keeping my vehicle versatile so I left it open to load however I needed to. A 20L water jerry can fits snuggly behind the fridge. The main storage area underneath can fit various size boxes and tool bags. I already have planned to have a Front Runner Flat Pack as a kitchen chuck box as well as my Viair 400P-A air compressor located there. I will also utilize another flat pack or cub pack for miscellaneous camping supplies. On the left side is a hinged storage area where I currently have my fiskars axe. I'll probably store a tool roll and some recovery equipment there too. My end goal is to not have it become my Tacoma where I loaded up the bed with whatever could fit.

IMG_20200410_201746_copy_3024x2268.jpgIMG_20200410_201910_copy_3024x2268.jpgIMG_20200410_201953_copy_2268x3024.jpg
 

llamalander

Active member
Am I right in thinking that I should paint the areas that will be covered by carpet with the same paint so that they are protected just to be safe from any damp that might get into the carpet?
[/QUOTE]
Only finishing a few sides of wood subject to moisture can be worse than none at all. The wood will often swell where exposed but not where protected, and cup or distort significantly. If you plan to paint or seal, do all six sides when possible.
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

Long Way Round: Chasing Shadows Across the World
by Ewan McGregor, Charley Boorman
From $14.59
999 Days Around Africa: The Road Chose Me
by Dan Grec, Dan Grec
From $19.95
First Overland: London-Singapore by Land Rover
by Tim Slessor
From $13.4
Tschiffely's Ride: Ten Thousand Miles in the Saddle from ...
by Aimé Tschiffely
From $10.99
Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Sur...
by Dave Canterbury
From $9.99
Here's my 85% solution; the sleeping platform is done with fridge installation where the center seat was. Driver's side second row seat is folded down and I have a storage door installed in that area. Passenger side is getting the fresh water tank, gray water tank for hot water heater/showers and 2nd battery with solar on the Power Distribution Panel (PDP). PDP will have the accessory fuse box, solar controller/charger, etc.. for all of those goodies.

The under platform in the back is currently getting a single slider that will house my removable organizer boxes (FR Wolf/Cub Packs) and quick access bags behind the tailgate for the various configurations of trips; the bags are the tan squares and will be velcro'd on the back panel for quick installation/removal.

Work in progress but getting there. Please disregard the dimensions of my chicken-scratch drawings. lol

IMG_2318.JPG
IMG_0733.JPG

IMG_0670.jpg

IMG_0671.jpg
IMG_3795.JPG

Screen Shot 2020-04-08 at 3.10.30 PM.pngScreen Shot 2020-04-08 at 3.16.26 PM.png
 
Last edited:

Axlesup

Member
it isn't quite finished yet but it is pretty close. i wanted to maximise storage space while making a sleeping platform that lined up with my seat in the folded down position. i also wanted to keep it light by using pine 2x2s instead of 2x10s. i also used some 1x6 pine tongue and groove planking for the platform to save weight. i glued the tongue and groove together.

i used a piano hinge for the folding bits and a small magnetic latch to keep it from rattling. i also used a strut to hold it open. i ordered a test bag so i can compartmentalize the storage area and it fit perfectly so i have a few more on order.

i can slide the entire thing out easily and pick it up by myself.
20200502_084440.jpg20200501_132600.jpg20200501_132608.jpg20200410_171207.jpg
 

Attachments

Last edited:
Top