Portable camp fire grates...?

Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
Not exactly what you’re looking for but I use one of these - https://firesideoutdoor.com

I’ve used it extensively where there is no existing fire pit or simply a stone ring. It elevates the fire on a mesh that allows for air to get under the fire to promote a cleaner and better fire, allows a grid for cooking and all folds to the size of a pack able chair.

The mesh is tight enough to keep ash and coals from falling through.

I also have the “mat” to catch ash and embers to allows to leave a clean site.

It’s a little tricky to use where a fire pit is provided (national parks for instance) where they specifically prohibit fires anywhere outside of the provided fire pit, but I have used it in those instances after a quick chat with the host or ranger.




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Great concept aside from high winds. Nice construction.
 

Hnoroian

Observer
Great idea for the v-style but please make sure the chainlink is not galvanized for health reasons. Never, ever burn galvanized anything.

I will be stealing this idea, and give total credit to you. That is brilliant!

Interesting idea, never put any thought into this before, but what comes to mind is a properly sized section of chain link fence. Put some hooks on to suspend it, with weight on it it will sag down hammock style but will be adjustable and as a multi use bonus it could be an emergency traction mat or drag it around camp to clean up leaves, twigs and rocks.
 
While I can't say that it's "collapsing or easily taken apart" (or light) I carry a cutoff section of a 55 gallon drum (about the bottom quarter) with holes drilled here and there. I often camp where there are no fire rings at all and when there is a fire ring, I don't use it. They are generally super inefficient (as you've noted) and waste a lot of heat. A small amount of wood in the barrel will generate more heat and last much longer than an equivalent amount in a random fire ring. The barrel also contains the fire better than any rock fire ring will (i.e. it's safer).

Using a barrel I can also kill the fire easily without ruining my coals by dumping water on the outside of the barrel.

Yes, it is bulky but it works so much better than any alternative. To conserve packed space I fill the barrel with wood. The wood would need the space anyway and the barrel keeps it all contained.
A pick axe or crow bar works wonders for making holes in drums. Drill bits are expensive and slow :)
 

JaSAn

Well-known member
I just carry a homemade 18" square grate made out of 1/8" steel rod.
Easy to prop up inside a fire ring with rocks or logs to create air space and build the fire on top.
 

motorcycle matt

Active member
Great idea for the v-style but please make sure the chainlink is not galvanized for health reasons. Never, ever burn galvanized anything.

I will be stealing this idea, and give total credit to you. That is brilliant!
I thought about that while typing but failed to give the proper safety warning. Thank you for bringing it up.
 

dbhost

Active member
Cheap, easy, and ultimately packable. Go to the hardware store / home improvement center like Home Depot, or Lowes, and buy a replacement coals grate for a Weber BBQ grill. Stand it on about 3 or 4 rocks to lift it up, and set your fire up on top of it. Pack it in / out when cooled off in a custom made stuff sack, or just use a heavy duty trash bag. Obviously all ashy, you don't want it just loose with your other gear...




$16.00 and done.

I tend to replace mine in my grills with these stainless steel ones instead of the Chromed steel stockers as the SS lasts a LOT longer.

Lacking rocks that can support you could always add something like some cleaned out tin cans like, oh, maybe tomato sauce cans to hold them up...

You don't need a TON of air space, but you do need space. The idea here is to keep the fire breathing, and not smothing in ash.
 

kdeleon

Observer
I have a snowpeak, love it but it is the first thing to go in my pack list when i'm on a big trip simply due to weight or no good space for it. Instead i bring a simple grate i sit on top of rock pits. I still make every excuse to use the snowpeak though just for the coolness factor :)

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emtmark

Austere Medical Provider
Not exactly what you’re looking for but I use one of these - https://firesideoutdoor.com

I’ve used it extensively where there is no existing fire pit or simply a stone ring. It elevates the fire on a mesh that allows for air to get under the fire to promote a cleaner and better fire, allows a grid for cooking and all folds to the size of a pack able chair.

The mesh is tight enough to keep ash and coals from falling through.

I also have the “mat” to catch ash and embers to allows to leave a clean site.

It’s a little tricky to use where a fire pit is provided (national parks for instance) where they specifically prohibit fires anywhere outside of the provided fire pit, but I have used it in those instances after a quick chat with the host or ranger.




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Have both sizes love them


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Riptide

Explorer
It's hard to go wrong with the Snow Peak Pack and Carry. Bomb proof. Easy to set up and break down; literally in seconds. The addition of a grate to the bottom means the fire maintains ample access to makeup air. The downside is that the grate is cast iron. Also bomb proof, if a little heavy. Drifta makes a simple SS mesh grate/net that serves the same purpose, and much lighter than the cast iron. Works great. Not cheap. But, buy once, cry once. The SP also can be fitted with several add-ons to increase it's functionality, stuff nobody else has. And you don't have to take it all with you on every trip. It's all modular. I can't recommend them highly enough!
 

dbhost

Active member
Another idea here. As others have noted, but used a specific brand name. You might consider looking into a wood gasifier fire pit. Absolutely not multi function, but it does what it does with excellence.

Bio LIte, Solo Stove etc.... make a variety of these things....

I have and use for when I want a small one person campfire an iRegro wood gasifier stove, basically a twig burner that burnes hot, clean, and almost completely smokeless. Almost no ash left over after a good long burn...

Of course the backpacking stove size model is probably not what you are looking for, but they make bigger sizes, and with some steel cans, and some effort you can even DIY your own for next to nothing. I'm honestly not that skilled in metalworking so not for me...

A word of warning about any of these approaches. As you introduce more oxygen to the combustion the fire will burn the fuel more completely (a fantastic thing), but by doing so, will mean the fire will be hotter, and coals won't last as long (potentially a bad thing).

For example, to get the iRegro going, I start off typically with a pile of pine straw, and the skinniest twigs I can find, spark them off with a ferro striker and let it go, that will typically by the time the straw is burnt halfway down the gasifier effect is starting, start feeding it larger and larger twigs, until you are at honestly a max of about 1" diameter branch pieces.

Once I am coaled up with the larger chunks, the wood gas is going pretty good, and I can cook on it. careful to keep feeding the fire as needed.
 
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