Patriot Campers

volpe30

Member
On March 12th I took possession of a new Patriot Campers X1 Grand Tourer. While doing my research I found there wasn’t/isn’t a lot of good, detailed information on them by current owners in the U.S. Given the significant investment I was looking for as much information as possible. My purpose in creating this thread is to provide straight forward and honest information and answers to questions for anyone looking to purchase a Patriot Camper—basically information I was looking for in my research to help guide my decision.

Before purchasing the Patriot I had an Xventure XV-2 for three years. There were things I loved and hated about that trailer. But the cons of the Xventure were not what drove me to sell it. A family member has a medical condition that, by spring 2018, had gotten to where climbing up and down the ladder to get into the RTT had become somewhat difficult. In addition, the thinner mattress, as most RTT’s have, was difficult for them to sleep on and they have also become increasingly sensitive to colder weather—even in the dead of summer temps in the mountains here in Idaho can regularly plummet to the low 40’s upper 30’s. The result was they were unable to get out camping, which this person loves to do. So, it was time to surf to the end of the internet to find a replacement trailer for our family—my wife and I, my 14 year old daughter and 11 year old son, and two dogs.

There is no shortage of options out there these days. First, we immediately eliminated a traditional travel trailer. We all wanted a trailer that could be taken off the beaten path—Idaho is just amazing itself (shh, don’t tell anyone—nothing here but flat land and potatoes) with over 70% public lands and we’re bordered by Utah, Montana, Oregon, Washington, Wyoming, and Nevada, so the number of breathtaking off the beaten path options are truly endless. I could spend years just exploring in awe what Idaho has to offer. The Patriot was on my radar early as an option, but I kept it at arm’s length due to the price—it was/is priced so much higher than what I think we are used to seeing in the market here for an adventure trailer. But in the end, I took the plunge head first and went with the Patriot X1-GT. Below I will explain how I ended up making that decision.

First, the Patriot addresses all the challenges my family member had with the Xventure. The X1 has a king size fold out bed that, once opened, has an actual staircase up to the sleeping area. The mattress is an actual mattress, a thin mattress, but definitely more significant than what is in most RTT’s and, after the addition of a 2” memory foam topper, will challenge my nice bed at home for comfort. In addition, there is an option, which we got, for a Webasto dual hot water and air heater that blows warm air into the tent via a vent. It won’t heat the tent to where it is hot, but it will knock the chill out of the air. Checking all those boxes meant we could not only get back out exploring and camping as a family, but do so comfortably (okay, let’s call it what it is, especially with this trailer—glamping to the max!) I like this definition I found online for glamping: “Glamping is where stunning nature meets modern luxury. It’s a way to experience the untamed and completely unique parts of the world—without having to sacrifice creature comforts.”

The second major factor was company sustainability and reputation. As I mentioned above, there are no shortage of adventure trailer options these days. “Overlanding” is growing and adventure trailer companies are popping up left and right. The problem is they are also failing and disappearing at an increasing pace. Moby1, which has been around for a bit, recently went under. Inka Outdoor is another company that met the same fate. With Moby1 there are countless stories on forums of people losing and fighting to get back their $12,000-$16,000 deposits. $16,000! No way I was going to put a huge deposit down with any chance of it disappearing. Many, I would even say most of the companies out there are independent, fairly new, and small. There are some exceptions like AT Overland, SoCal Teardrops, and others that are established, have a good reputation, and have been around a while. I’m not saying these smaller companies don’t make a quality product as I’m sure many do. Normally I would encourage and back small businesses, but when talking the money these things cost I wanted to go with a company that was established, was growing, was on solid ground as a business that will be around for the foreseeable future, and that had a good reputation. It is one of the reasons I went with Xventure (Schutt Industries, a major military supplier) for my first trailer. While Patriot has only been building their trailers for 5-6 years, the owner, Justin Montesalvo, has a sheet metal business that is successful and has been around a while. Plus, Patriot has won Austalia’s Camper Trailer of the Year award five years in a row and the company is not only well established but growing rapidly. Actually, rapid growth can have its own issues, and was something I was a little concerned about as rapid expansion can often lead to a decrease in quality control across the manufacturing process. Plus, the owners now have a TV show and lots of other stuff going on which can result in the “captain losing control of the ship” a bit. I’ll address this a bit below. Now, I had concerns with it being an Australian company with only one U.S. importer/distributor—Exploration Outfitters (EO). So, I called and spoke with Matt Green, the owner of EO, who was outstanding in taking all the time needed to listen to and address my concerns. First, I wanted to ensure EO itself would be viable over time as a business and Patriot Campers distributor. I won’t divulge Matt’s business but suffice to say he is both invested in and committed to a long-term relationship with Patriot Campers. Second, warranty and service—EO is located in Mead, OK—a very far drive from Boise, ID for any service or warranty issues. While I’m hoping there won’t be any, you never know. Matt assured me that if necessary they would work with a local shop to get whatever needed to be taken care of taken care of. That mentality cut across every conversation I had with Matt and his staff. From everything I have experienced and seen thus far they are 110% committed to customer service—outstanding outfit and people from top to bottom. So, all that to say my concerns about the manufacturer and distributor being around for the long-term were addressed.

Third on the list is quality. I didn’t have the opportunity to see a Patriot Camper in person. So, I read what was out there, watched YouTube videos, and searched forums. Patriot has a huge social media and YouTube presence that, while very polished and well done, must be at least half seen for what it is—a very well done and entertaining infomercial across multiple platforms. It is a major factor in how fast they have been able to build their brand. That’s not a knock, just a fact. I’ve watched every YouTube video they have and every available episode of Patriot Games—great stuff and they definitely put their products through the ringer. I wanted to verify all the glowing content with facts. That wasn’t easy and is why I’m starting this thread. What I was able to find in forums and some independent YouTube videos was all positive reviews that focused in general terms on impressive build quality that was a step or several steps above other available options. So, from what I was able to glean from the internet and forums, coupled with my needs outlined above and talking with Matt Green at EO, I decided to go all in and commit to the purchase. Now, I’ve only had the trailer for two weeks and have only camped two nights with my son, but I will say that the quality and attention to detail of the trailer is very impressive. I say that with one caveat. I mentioned above that rapid growth can have a negative impact on quality control. Not sure that’s the case here, but when I picked up the trailer there were a couple of minor issues. First, the spare tire carrier, at some point during either manufacturing or shipping from Australia, rubbed against the trailer body in two spots. Both spots had rubbed through the paint. They were small, but they were there. Second, there was a handle that you grab onto to unfold the bed that hadn’t been installed. Now, these are two very minor things that have zero impact on the capability of the trailer. However, Patriot Campers bills itself as a premium product and they certainly have a premium price—In my opinion they should be flawless when you first get them. Now I know, I’m being nitpicky and it’s an adventure trailer that will eventually have pinstriping all over it along with countless rock chips etc. But, given the price and the hype, it should be flawless brand new--that’s just my opinion. Feel free to disagree. It is important to note that neither of those issues was the result of Exploration Outfitters. In fact, Matt and his folks got it straightened out the same afternoon. Again, I can’t say enough about the outstanding customer service, professionalism, and people at Exploration Outfitters.



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volpe30

Member
So, with all that said about how I ended up in a Patriot Camper you’re wondering how good is it? Does it live up to the hype of their YouTube videos and social media posts? Is it worth it? I’ve only had it for two weeks—but so far I’d say yes, I can confirm some of it lives up to the hype and the rest certainly has the potential to live up to the hype—time and use will tell. As I said above, build quality, fit and finish, and attention to detail appear to be outstanding—beautiful even (weird thing to say about an adventure trailer). Everything just feels well built, quality, and solid. Ever close the door on a well-made German car? If you have then you know it just has a solid feeling to it that “feels quality” that is just different from other cars. The Patriot has that feeling. The Redarc TVMS (controls all the electronic bells and whistles) is intuitive and awesome. The Webasto water heater and tent heater is the same. The tent/living area is really nice and deploys and sets up relatively easily and quickly. That being said I didn’t set up the awning, porches, or kids room. All that would take some time and more so to break down and put away. The trailer tows smoothly and is quiet (the Xventure bounced like crazy over the smallest bumps and made a racket!). While I haven’t had a chance to really test it, the suspension is impressive.

Is it worth it? Only you can answer that question. For me going on awesome adventures and making awesome memories with my kids that they will remember forever makes it worth it. Having an awesome fly fishing base camp for trout and steelhead fishing is worth it. Having a trailer that is “fire and forget” so I can focus on enjoying the trip, my surroundings, and family and not worrying about something breaking in a remote area, that things will just work, is definitely worth it. It’s an investment—one that better last a long time!

I’ll update this thread as I use the trailer more and will give more detailed information on each aspect of it—tent, kitchen, water system, electronics, how things are holding up, any issues, etc. In the meantime, please let me know if there are any questions I can answer—after all, that’s why I started this thread—with the caveat that I’ve only had it for two weeks. And if you happen to be within driving distance of Boise and would like to see one in person I’d be happy to try and make that happen.

Sorry for such a long post—it ended up a lot longer than I initially intended.

-Rich


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kwilkins

New member
Rich, I really appreciate you starting this thread and the willingness to share your Patriot Camper (PC) experiences. I am in the same place you were prior to your purchase. I've done a ton of research on PC, seen the videos, read the forums, emailed with Matt at EO, etc. In addition to PC I have been researching other expedition trailers, of varying shapes and sizes. I will gladly spend more for a quality product that will last.

I'm fairly familiar with the features and specs of the X1, so most of my questions will revolve around using the X1. I have a hectic schedule and not nearly the time I would like to get out and camp. The time it takes to setup and breakdown on some occasions will determine if I get out or not. Some Saturdays late morning/early afternoon I'll be asking "is it worth it to go on an overnight trip"?

I won't bombard you with all of my questions at once ;) but here are a few top of mind.

How long does it take to setup the bed and main tent?
How long does it take to breakdown the bed and main tent? I've seen the PC setup/take-down videos, but those are the guys that built the trailer, they have done it hundreds of times and are motivated to show how easy it is.

Does the main tent stay connected to the bed area when it is stored for travel? Or do you have to remove and attach the main tent each time?

How difficult is it to get the cover on and zippered? In researching roof top tents it seems the main complaint about the non-hardtop RTT's is dealing with the tight fit of the cover.

I have seen a number of comments about the heater (including yours) saying that it will "knock the chill out" but won't actually get warm. Would you please elaborate if possible with some numbers. If it is 40 degrees outside is the tent 45 or 60? Does the sleeping area get warmer then the ground tent area? If the temps are low does the heater run continuously?

Okay, I'll stop now so this thread doesn't turn into a novel. Thanks for any and all information you can share.

Ken
 

volpe30

Member
Rich, I really appreciate you starting this thread and the willingness to share your Patriot Camper (PC) experiences. I am in the same place you were prior to your purchase. I've done a ton of research on PC, seen the videos, read the forums, emailed with Matt at EO, etc. In addition to PC I have been researching other expedition trailers, of varying shapes and sizes. I will gladly spend more for a quality product that will last.

I'm fairly familiar with the features and specs of the X1, so most of my questions will revolve around using the X1. I have a hectic schedule and not nearly the time I would like to get out and camp. The time it takes to setup and breakdown on some occasions will determine if I get out or not. Some Saturdays late morning/early afternoon I'll be asking "is it worth it to go on an overnight trip"?

I won't bombard you with all of my questions at once ;) but here are a few top of mind.

How long does it take to setup the bed and main tent?
How long does it take to breakdown the bed and main tent? I've seen the PC setup/take-down videos, but those are the guys that built the trailer, they have done it hundreds of times and are motivated to show how easy it is.

Does the main tent stay connected to the bed area when it is stored for travel? Or do you have to remove and attach the main tent each time?

How difficult is it to get the cover on and zippered? In researching roof top tents it seems the main complaint about the non-hardtop RTT's is dealing with the tight fit of the cover.

I have seen a number of comments about the heater (including yours) saying that it will "knock the chill out" but won't actually get warm. Would you please elaborate if possible with some numbers. If it is 40 degrees outside is the tent 45 or 60? Does the sleeping area get warmer then the ground tent area? If the temps are low does the heater run continuously?

Okay, I'll stop now so this thread doesn't turn into a novel. Thanks for any and all information you can share.

Ken
Hi Ken: Happy to answer any questions you have.

Keep in mind that I've only set it up once at this point. But in this case that's a good thing, because for my first time I thought it was pretty quick. Getting the cover off took me less than 5 minutes. It'll get faster with practice and after the cover stretches a bit from use. It's a bit tight on the corners, but that'll loosen up and it's really not that bad. They smartly installed four pull tabs on each corner of the cover that help a lot in folding them up to unzip and zip and down when putting the cover back on after zipping. The cover is probably the biggest pain with any tent like this, but it's really not that bad. Biggest challenge for me is I'm short, which makes it a bit more of a challenge. If you're taller it will be that much easier. On a side note--I keep a large duffel to stuff the cover in and then just put it under the trailer. With my old trailer I used to just put the cover under the trailer. At the end of a trip early last year I pulled it out and two mice came flying out of it. Startled me, but worse, they chewed a hole through the cover. Nothing some Gorilla Tape couldn't fix, but after that I put the cover in a large duffel bag to protect it and haven't had an issue since.

After getting the cover off the tent unfolds/opens up very easily. The main tent, like in the pictures I posted above, is all attached as one piece. Maybe took me a couple of minutes to get it all opened up by myself. After that only takes a minute or so to put the two poles in that give the front part of the tent it's structure. The part that takes the longest is you have to stake down the four corners of the tent. Well, I guess you don't have to, but any wind it'll move around if you don't and it just gives it better structure by keeping the corners from folding in. It was my 11 year old son's job to stake down the corners, and it only took him somewhere around 10-15 minutes. I do, however, see some potential challenges with staking down the four corners in the future. We do camp in state and federal campgrounds at times. An example would be last summer on the Oregon coast where really the only options to camp along the coast are state campgrounds. I'm sure there are some super secret places where you can camp on the beach, but for most of the state it's illegal. In campgrounds setting up in a spot made for trailers will mean not being able to drive the stakes into the ground. But heavy objects in the corners of the tent can work as well as other workarounds.

So not too much time to set up so far. Even with practice I wouldn't say it'll be "lightning fast," but not too bad either. I also was taking my time and wasn't trying to see how fast I could set it up. Just doing it at a leisurely pace. After that it only takes a minute to unfold the bed, if that. So setup time just for the main tent and bed is relatively quick. The longest part is getting all your sleeping and other stuff into the tent. If you pre-pack the tent before you head out you could fold up the tent with most of your bedding in there so it's already in place once you get to camp and set up.

One thing that I will have to find a solution for is the main tent is designed so you have access to the two compartments on the passenger side of the trailer once the tent is deployed. However, once you unzip the tent panels that give you the access to the compartments there is a gap between the side of the tent and the side of the trailer. Probably an inch or less gap maybe 12 inches in length top to bottom, but plenty of room to allow things you don't want in your tent to get in, like blood sucking mosquitoes (I f#*$ing hate mosquitoes!). You can zip the two tent wall panels up, but then you have to unzip them any time you want to access the trailer compartments. One easy solution I will try next time I'm out is to bring along two towels to roll up and stuff in those gaps.

Breaking it down isn't much longer. It all folds up pretty easily. Probably took me 30 minutes from start to the cover being on. Again, that'll get faster with practice and I wasn't rushing it. Where things begin to take a long time, at least from my experience with my Xventure, is when you have the awning out, guyed down with all the ropes and pegs, and all the other stuff out. I think with the Patriot, if I had the awning out and guyed down, the porches attached and guyed down, and the kids room up and all the tent and kids room guy lines pegged down, it would be a chore to set up and even more of a chore to break down. With all that plus all your other stuff it would be, I would guess, a two hour breakdown for your whole camping setup from start to finish. Maybe 1-1.5 hours with practice. Most likely for us, if we are on the move daily, most we'll have out is the main tent and kids room attached. Only time I'll set the awning up is if it's raining or if we are staying in one spot for multiple days. In my three years owning our Xventure, with countless days of camping with it, I set the awning up maybe a handful of times. One of the reasons is we don't get a lot of rain in Idaho, Eastern Oregon, or Southern Utah--where I spend most of my time. What usually takes equally long, if not longer, is getting everything else put away and organized--camp chairs, camp table, cooking stuff, sleeping stuff, etc. But the way the Patriot is compartmentalized and designed, the way the kitchen/fridge is set up, I found breaking down camp was much easier and faster than it was with the Xventure when we went out last week.

As for the heater, I think the temps dropped to the low 40's when we were out. I woke up in the middle of the night chilly, so dragged my ass out of bed to go turn the heater on for a bit. I will say walking down the stairs is so sweet compared to climbing down a ladder. After the heat was on I can't really say what temp it got up to, but I woke up an hour or so later to open my sleeping bag because I was warm. I'll have to actually measure the temp difference on a cool night from having it off to having it on. But it definitely made a noticeable difference. The vent is on the side of the bed. I think the further you get from the bed the less you would get the warmth from the heater. So the kids room, for example, will probably not benefit nearly as much, and it may have less of an impact in the main tent as well given all the extra open space. I will try to test it out soon in different configurations and report back. I carry a Mr. Buddy heater that I can always kick on as well if needed.

Hope that answers your questions. Others with experience will hopefully chime in as well. Feel free to ask more questions.

-Rich
 

kwilkins

New member
Rich, thanks again for the reply.

I'm 5'8" tall and was wondering about height when dealing with the cover. Are you shorter or taller?

The refrigerator looks like it may be to high to easily see what is in it. Is that the case for you, or can you see down into the fridge without standing on a step?

Was the heater noisy up in the bed when it was running?

Did you consider and research the X1-H with the auto hardtop?

I look forward to hearing more about your adventures. Congrats on the new Patriot Camper.
 

volpe30

Member
Rich, thanks again for the reply.

I'm 5'8" tall and was wondering about height when dealing with the cover. Are you shorter or taller?

The refrigerator looks like it may be to high to easily see what is in it. Is that the case for you, or can you see down into the fridge without standing on a step?

Was the heater noisy up in the bed when it was running?

Did you consider and research the X1-H with the auto hardtop?

I look forward to hearing more about your adventures. Congrats on the new Patriot Camper.
5'8? You're a giant man! I'm only 5'5, so I would say you would be fine dealing with the cover. Same with the refrigerator--no problem with access or seeing inside at all. Even easier with the air suspension as you can drop the trailer by letting the air out and then just push the switches the opposite way and pump it back up when you are ready to roll.

The heater, while not silent, isn't noisy either. It's not bad at all.

Paying what I paid for the X1-GT was a significant investment for my family, so I never really considered the $10,000 up-charge for the X1-H. The cost benefit just isn't there at all from my perspective just for the hard top and electric opening. You still have to pull the tent out, zip up the bottom, and the enclosure that is already attached on the X1-GT is separate on the X1-H and has to be zipped on. So for me and my needs and means it was never a consideration.

-Rich
 

2Jeeps&PatriotX1

Active member
Thanks for providing your feedback/thoughts on the x1. I too just picked up a X1 from the guys at Exploration Outfitters. Looks like a few days before you got yours.

I haven’t got ours out yet but I did set it up and take down in my garage. Will take a few times to get it simplified and dialed in but took less time than I thought it would on my first try.



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volpe30

Member
Thanks for providing your feedback/thoughts on the x1. I too just picked up a X1 from the guys at Exploration Outfitters. Looks like a few days before you got yours.

I haven’t got ours out yet but I did set it up and take down in my garage. Will take a few times to get it simplified and dialed in but took less time than I thought it would on my first try.



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Congratulations, nice setup! I also put everything up this past weekend—main tent, awning, porches, and kids tent and, while definitely a chore, was not as bad as I expected. I did find an issue with the sewing coming apart on an attachment for the rear porch (picture) and have an email in to Matt. I’m sure they’ll take care of it without issue.

I also found that the handle on the BBQ was rubbing on the Webasto, so I put a cut a strip off a teflon sheet and stuck it on there.





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volpe30

Member
Took the trailer out this past weekend. The plan was to head to Craters of the Moon National Monument. Well, there was significantly more snow there than I expected. We were going to just camp at the campground, but it was closed due to over a foot of snow still being on the ground. So we found a spot nearby. Temps dropped to 28 degrees, so had the Webasto on all night to run the heater. While it was still cold in the tent, it certainly would have been quite a bit colder without the heater going. So far, the Webasto is doing what I expected as far as heating the tent--worth the extra money. Also impressed with how efficient it is. I've been running it quite a bit and it's barely used any of the diesel. To that point, there is no smell associated with running it. So, definitely happy with that aspect of the trailer.

So far the trailer is living up to the hype and expectations--albeit with limited use. Still have yet to really put it to the test on harder trails, but it'll be a bit with all the moisture we've been getting in the mountains. That being said, I'm finding there are a few things I wish it had. First, some rock lights would be really nice. Given the cost of the trailer I really don't know why there aren't some included. One of the things I really liked on my Xventure were the rock lights and external lights. Rock lights are nice to turn on when it's dark and you have all other lights turned off. They light up the perimeter of the trailer in a muted way so you can see what's going on and not trip or step on things. Also, a cool aspect of the Redarc TVMS is you can control all the lights and electronics via an app with your phone. Having the ability to turn on rock lights via the app when you have to head out in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom would be super nice. Even better would be a hard wired switch to turn on rock lights from inside the tent. In short, in the couple of times I've been out I definitely found myself missing the rock lights that my Xventure had. Second, a couple of external perimeter lights would be nice. This way you could have even more perimeter lighting if you want/need it without having to open up the trailer. Another aspect I miss from the Xventure (see pic with rock lights and perimeter lights on). Last, I wish they could engineer the tent cover similar to that of what my Eezi-Awn had. The Patriot has a zipper that you have to work around the entire thing and then go around again and connect 10 straps. The Eezi-Awn you put on and then cinched/ratcheted down similar to that of a cargo strap. It was just a much simpler design that was faster and worked just fine in keeping out dirt, dust, etc.

The above being said, I will say the tent sets up pretty quickly--as long as you are on ground that is easy to drive stakes into to stake out the corners of the tent. If not, it will make set up a bit more complicated.

Xventure lighting.


Still lots of snow, and more coming down when I took this picture.



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2Jeeps&PatriotX1

Active member
Took the trailer out this past weekend. The plan was to head to Craters of the Moon National Monument. Well, there was significantly more snow there than I expected. We were going to just camp at the campground, but it was closed due to over a foot of snow still being on the ground. So we found a spot nearby. Temps dropped to 28 degrees, so had the Webasto on all night to run the heater. While it was still cold in the tent, it certainly would have been quite a bit colder without the heater going. So far, the Webasto is doing what I expected as far as heating the tent--worth the extra money. Also impressed with how efficient it is. I've been running it quite a bit and it's barely used any of the diesel. To that point, there is no smell associated with running it. So, definitely happy with that aspect of the trailer.

So far the trailer is living up to the hype and expectations--albeit with limited use. Still have yet to really put it to the test on harder trails, but it'll be a bit with all the moisture we've been getting in the mountains. That being said, I'm finding there are a few things I wish it had. First, some rock lights would be really nice. Given the cost of the trailer I really don't know why there aren't some included. One of the things I really liked on my Xventure were the rock lights and external lights. Rock lights are nice to turn on when it's dark and you have all other lights turned off. They light up the perimeter of the trailer in a muted way so you can see what's going on and not trip or step on things. Also, a cool aspect of the Redarc TVMS is you can control all the lights and electronics via an app with your phone. Having the ability to turn on rock lights via the app when you have to head out in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom would be super nice. Even better would be a hard wired switch to turn on rock lights from inside the tent. In short, in the couple of times I've been out I definitely found myself missing the rock lights that my Xventure had. Second, a couple of external perimeter lights would be nice. This way you could have even more perimeter lighting if you want/need it without having to open up the trailer. Another aspect I miss from the Xventure (see pic with rock lights and perimeter lights on). Last, I wish they could engineer the tent cover similar to that of what my Eezi-Awn had. The Patriot has a zipper that you have to work around the entire thing and then go around again and connect 10 straps. The Eezi-Awn you put on and then cinched/ratcheted down similar to that of a cargo strap. It was just a much simpler design that was faster and worked just fine in keeping out dirt, dust, etc.

The above being said, I will say the tent sets up pretty quickly--as long as you are on ground that is easy to drive stakes into to stake out the corners of the tent. If not, it will make set up a bit more complicated.

Xventure lighting.


Still lots of snow, and more coming down when I took this picture.



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I’m getting ready to install rocklights on our x1. Have them on my LJ jeep and find them useful when working underneath in the dark. For the x1, they’ll come in handy when out in the pitch dark, having 2 dogs and the fact I go to bed late and get up real early, without turning on the tent & awning lights and waking the wife up.

My plan is to tie them into the TVMS system. I removed the fuse panel this weekend to see what I was working with and read through the manual.


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